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Alaska Grid

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by

Rob Roys

on 11 September 2013

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Transcript of Alaska Grid

AFFORDABLE
FOR A
ENERGY
SUSTAINABLE
ALASKA
COMMONWEALTH NORTH
Energy for a Sustainable Alaska:
The Railbelt Predicament & The Rural Conundrum
STUDY GROUP FINDINGS
A statewide vision, plan and implementation strategy
Regional grids- efficiencies, less redundancy, renewables
Reduce diesel fuel consumption
A single entity to coordinate generation and transmission
Pursue value for investments, provide "one stop shop"
Eliminate the need for Power Cost Equalization
ALASKA:
What We
Spend on
Heat &
Power
Southcentral
Electricity Revenue
Gas Revenue
$1.024B
$564B
Diesel Fuel
Fairbanks
Kodiak, Copper Valley, SE
Rest of Alaska
150B Gal
68B Gal
163B Gal
@ $4/gallon $1.524B
$3.084B/YEAR
Utilizes diesel for half of electric generation and most space heating needs. Home expenditures now rival the mortgage - especially in the winter.
Southcentral Alaska
Current power generation is unsustainable without continued discover of and investment in Cook Inlet natural gas. By current estimates, Southcentral Alaska will have to import LNG or CNG by 2015 to supplement Cook Inlet production.
Utilizes diesel for half of electric generation and most space heating needs. Home expenditures now rival the mortgage - especially in the winter.
Interior Alaska
Rural Alaska
An Energy Shortage
in Alaska - Really?
According to state reports, the North Slope has 235 trillion cubic (tcf) of technically recoverable gas. This would supply 5 GW of energy for 1,000 years.

New gas extraction techniques (fracking) have driven the price of natural gas to record lows (~$3/mcf). As fracking becomes more widespread across the world, Alaska’s North Slope gas assets are virtually assured to remain ‘stranded’.
How do we use
this plentiful source of inexpensive energy for the benefit of all Alaskans?
We
propose a
solution...
ALASKA'S ENERGY SOLUTION
HVDC:
North Slope Power Generation
Economies of Scale
Cost Effective
Lower Emissions
New Markets
Larger generation capacity producing more efficient power is more affordable
Larger consumer base creates more affordable power
More environmentally responsible and a step toward sustainability
Taking stranded gas to market, creating a long-term, sustainable market
Large-scale natural gas generation on the North Slope
High-voltage direct current transmission system designed for delivery of affordable energy at maximum efficiency throughout the state
Abundant, affordable power for:
North Slope operations
Fairbanks and other Railbelt communities
Remote mines, military and processors
Heat and power for rural communitie
High Voltage Direct Current Transmission
Reliable & redundant design
Local spinning reserve
98% availability
Most efficient technology for delivery bulk power long distances
Most cost effective
Double circuit (bipolar)
Maintained locally ensuring reliability
Lower installed costs
Reduced Right of Way (ROW)
HVDC:
Connecting
the World
Power

1930
1920
2000
3100
3000
6400
Voltage

±533
±500
±450
±500
±500
±800
Length

887
490
925
850
662
1294
Year Built

1979
1986
1992
1985
2007
2010
Cahora Bassa
Utah-California
Quebec-N. England
Pacific Intertie (WA-CA)
Three Gorges-Shanghai
Xiangjiaba-Shanghai
(MW) (kV) (Miles)
IN EUROPE
IN NORTH AMERICA
Manitoba Hydro
Similar dimension & scale
500+ miles
68% of all power transmitted via HVDC
Project Details
Phase 1 (1972) - Manitoba Hydro began delivery of 1,620 MW from Nelson River Hydro sites to Winnipeg via a 500 HVDC transmission line
Phase 2 (1985) - additional 1,800 MW added via a 580 mile long HVDC transmission line
Phase 3 (2017) - 800 mile HVDC transmission line will allow Manitoba Hydro to transfer nearly 5 GW of hydropower from Hudson Bay to its large load center in Winnipeg
IN CHINA
1,250+ miles
8,000 MW
37B kWh/year
Planned for 2014
$3.7 Billion
ALASKA'S ECONOMIC FUTURE
HVDC:
Support Railbelt utility grids
Provide affordable heat & power for Fairbanks and rural communities
Harness remote renewable resources, such as wind, hydro, tidal and geothemal
Encourage sustainable economic diversification
Reduce particulate emissions and greenhouse gases by replacing less efficient, aged generation
Industry value-add such as ore processing
Sustained job growth
Reduce CO2 production from diesel generation by ~60%
Reduce North Slope CO2 emissions by ~50%
2,000 MW Power Plant
on the North Slope
Provide electricity for NS activities
Replace mechanical gas-fired systems with electric
Provide avenue to integrate Arctic wind power
Capital Cost: $2.5 Billion
Delivered Cost of Power: $0.05/kWh
Fairbanks HVDC Transmission
Power to GVEA - adequate to provide space heat
Adequate energy for Fort Knox
Adequate energy for Livengood mining district
Capital Cost: $1.65 Billion
Delivered Cost of Power: $0.05 + $0.015 = $0.065/kWh
West Coast HVDC Transmission
Adequate energy supply for Ambler mining district
Power for Red Dog Mine
Power for Kotzebue/Nome area (electricity & heat)
Pathway for West Coast wind power
Capital Cost: $900 Million
Delivered Cost of Power: $0.065 + $0.107 =
$0.172/kWh (40% capacity)
$0.12/kWh (80% capacity)
Alaska Grid: Phase 4
Yukon-Kuskokwim HVDC Transmission
Adequate power for Donlin Gold
Adequate power for Bethel and surrounding area
Capital Cost: $510 Million
Delivered Cost of Power:
$0.065 + $0.058 = $0.123/kWh (40% capacity)
$0.098/kWh (80% capacity)
Alaska Grid: Phase 5
Southcentral HVDC Transmission
Adequate power to supplement local generation
Pathway to move hydropower from Susitna-Watana
Pathway to integrate tidal/geothermal power
Capital Cost: $1.2 Billion
Delivered Cost of Power: $0.065 + $0.022 = $0.087/kWh
Alaska Grid: Phase 3
Alaska Grid: Phase 1
Alaska Grid: Phase 2
ALASKA GRID:
DO WE COMPETE WITH GAS EXPORTS?
North Slope gas reserves are
235 trillion cubic foot (tcf)
833 MW project uses 38 bcf/year - 1.14 tcf in 30 years (0.5%)
1.7 GW project uses 76 bcf/year - 2.28 tcf in 30 years (1.0%)
2.5 GW project uses 113 bcf/year - 3.4 tcf in 30 years (1.5%)
5.0 GW project uses 226 bcf/year - 6.8 tcf in 30 years (2.9%)
Let's ship 'Made in Alaska' - not pieces of Alaska!
ALASKA GRID:
THE LAST WORD
HVDC transmission can move power over long distances at greater efficiency and better stability than conventional AC transmission.
HVDC can provide power to all of Alaska's constituencies in ~5-7 years.
HVDC transmission and high-efficiency gas turbine technology can:
Provide power to North Slope operations
Support the Railbelt grid
Replace diesel oil, wood, and coal used to heat Fairbanks and rural communities
Energize distant mining, military and processing operations
Revitalize rural Alaska
Create thousands of jobs
Energize a robust Alaska economy
AFFORDABLE
ENERGY
FOR A
SUSTAINABLE
ALASKA
For more information, please visit
www.allalaskaenergyproject.com
Full transcript