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Rigor and Relevance Framework

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Emily Christensen

on 13 January 2014

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Transcript of Rigor and Relevance Framework

Rigor/Relevance Framework
X: Application Model (AKA Relevance)

Y: Knowledge Taxonomy (AKA Rigor)

1. Knowledge of one discipline
2. Application within discipline
3. Application across disciplines
4. Application to real world predictable situations
5. Application to real world unpredictable situations


1. Awareness
2. Comprehension
3. Application
4. Analysis
5. Synthesis
6. Evaluation


Rigor/Relevant Framework

Memorable Learning

Think – pair – share

Recall a “memorable” learning experience you have had in your life.

What made it memorable?

How could you take your experience to create a memorable learning opportunity for your students?

http://www.odu.edu/educ/roverbau/Bloom/blooms_taxonomy.htm

New Version – 1990s

Old Version - 1956

RIGOR - Bloom’s Taxonomy

RELEVANCE – Do the learners…

…understand how this information or skill has some application in their lives?

…recognize this as work that people do in real life?

…have the opportunity to follow their own process rather than just learn the facts as taught by their teacher?

…learn NOT just content and skills, but learn how they learn?

...possess intrinsic motivation or are they solely extrinsicly motivated?

...have a reason to care?

...have a reason to believe that
you

care?

Rigor/Relevance Framework ™

Knowledge Taxonomy : "Rigor"

Application Model : "Relevance"

B

A

D

C

Rigor/Relevance Framework ™

Knowledge

Application

B

A

D

C

Rigor/Relevance Framework ™

Low

Low

High

High

Student
Work

Student
Think & Work

Student
Think

Teacher/Student Roles

Teacher
Work

Rigor/Relevance Framework

C

D

B

A

RELEVANCE

R
I
G
O
R

Low

Low

High

High

Right Procedure (one way to do it)

Right Questions (new; open ended; more than one answer; no answer)

Rational, Justified, Research-Based
Answer

Did Students Get it Right?

Right Answer (one right answer)


Rigor/Relevance Framework

C

D

B

A

RELEVANCE

R
I
G
O
R

Reflection to Follow Right Steps

Reflection to Create, Design, or Develop

Reflection to Analyze

Reflective Thought

No Reflection
Only the Right
Answer

Rigor/Relevance Framework

C

D

B

A

A P P L I C A T I O N

K
N
O
W
L
E
D
G
E

Requires relationships where students work effectively with others (working with partners or groups)

Requires cooperative and supportive relationships at high levels and with multiple people

Requires relationships where students receive assistance as needed (peer or teacher tutoring)

Relationships

Relationships have little to no influence on learning

Rigor/Relevance Framework

C

D

B

A

A P P L I C A T I O N

K
N
O
W
L
E
D
G
E

Changing Nature of Work
International Comparisons
Changing Youth
Way to Focus on Student Learning
Tool for School Alignment
Explain What is Important
It is what is on THE test
Increase Student Motivation
Intrinsic not just extrinsic motivation

Why Rigor and Relevance?

Challenging Assessments
Interdisciplinary Instruction
Reading in the Content Area
Communicating with Parents
Use of Technology
New Teaching Ideas
Peer Teaching Observations
Peer Learning Experience Review
Action Research
Continuous Professional Development

Ways to Increase Rigor and Relevance

Better prepare students for future work
Way to focus student learning on priority standards
Ensure student achieve standards
Align curriculum, instruction and assessment
Prepare for state tests
Increase student interest and motivation
Learning for the sake of learning not just for the sake of the grade.
Benefits of Using Rigor and Relevance?

Instructional Strategies: How to Teach for Rigor and Relevance

“Teaching is only as good as the learning that takes place.”

Selection of Strategies Based on
Rigor/
Relevance Framework

Practice What You Know
At your table:
1. Select a well known Children's Fairy Tale or Nursery Rhyme of your choice.
2. Identify a questioning stem for each level of the Application Model (Relevance), as applied to the Fairy Tale.
**You will have a total of 5 questions or activities.
3. Post your #5 activity on https://todaysmeet.com/Application
Application Model (Relevance)
1. Knowledge of one discipline
2. Application within discipline
3. Application across disciplines
4. Application to real world predictable situations
5. Application to real world unpredictable situations
For example: Little Miss Muffett
1. Tell the story in your own words.
2. Define the terms tuffet, curds, and whey then draw a cartoon to illustrate the plot and new vocabulary in this nursery rhyme.
3. Some say that this rhyme refers to Mary, Queen of Scots, and her fear of John Knox, a Scottish clergyman who, after return from exile, led the Protestant Reformation, which led to the queen being overthrown. Explain how this rhyme mirrors the situation of the queen.
4. What phobia might a psychologist say that Miss Muffett suffers? What text evidence supports your answer? Discuss the traditional symbolism of a spider and why an author would select such a creature as an antagonist.
5. Identify a current event in world news or politics, then rewrite the rhyme, substituting a different antagonist, and creating an alternative ending, which mirrors your selected current event.
With your table group, use your Activity 2 Planning Guide to determine an activity, within your content, that would fit into quadrant C and an activity that would fit into quadrant D. Text 28240 and your message to 37607
"Mrs. Jones, are we doing anything important in here today?"
The Little Boy
by Helen Buckley


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Once a little boy went to school.
He was quite a little boy
And it was quite a big school.
But when the little boy
Found that he could go to his room
By walking right in from the door outside
He was happy;
And the school did not seem
Quite so big anymore.


One morning
When the little boy had been in school awhile,
The teacher said:
"Today we are going to make a picture."
"Good!" thought the little boy.
He liked to make all kinds;
Lions and tigers,
Chickens and cows,
Trains and boats;
And he took out his box of crayons
And began to draw.
But the teacher said, "Wait!"
"It is not time to begin!"
And she waited until everyone looked ready.
"Now," said the teacher,
"We are going to make flowers."
"Good!" thought the little boy,
He liked to make beautiful ones
With his pink and orange and blue crayons.
But the teacher said "Wait!"
"And I will show you how."
And it was red, with a green stem.
"There," said the teacher,
"Now you may begin."
The little boy looked at his teacher's flower
Then he looked at his own flower.
He liked his flower better than the teacher's
But he did not say this.
He just turned his paper over,
And made a flower like the teacher's.
It was red, with a green stem.
On another day
When the little boy had opened
The door from the outside all by himself,
The teacher said:
"Today we are going to make something with clay."
"Good!" thought the little boy;
He liked clay.
He could make all kinds of things with clay:
Snakes and snowmen,
Elephants and mice,
Cars and trucks
And he began to pull and pinch
His ball of clay.


But the teacher said, "Wait!"
"It is not time to begin!"
And she waited until everyone looked ready.
"Now," said the teacher,
"We are going to make a dish."
"Good!" thought the little boy,
He liked to make dishes.
And he began to make some
That were all shapes and sizes.
But the teacher said "Wait!"
"And I will show you how."
And she showed everyone how to make
One deep dish.
"There," said the teacher,
"Now you may begin."
The little boy looked at the teacher's dish;
Then he looked at his own.
He liked his better than the teacher's
But he did not say this.
He just rolled his clay into a big ball again
And made a dish like the teacher's.
It was a deep dish.
And pretty soon
The little boy learned to wait,
And to watch
And to make things just like the teacher.
And pretty soon
He didn't make things of his own anymore.
Then it happened
That the little boy and his family
Moved to another house,
In another city,
And the little boy
Had to go to another school.
This school was even bigger
Than the other one.
And there was no door from the outside
Into his room.
He had to go up some big steps
And walk down a long hall
To get to his room.
And the very first day
He was there,
The teacher said:
"Today we are going to make a picture."
"Good!" thought the little boy.
And he waited for the teacher
To tell what to do.
But the teacher didn't say anything.
She just walked around the room.
When she came to the little boy
She asked, "Don't you want to make a picture?"
"Yes," said the lttle boy.
"What are we going to make?"
"I don't know until you make it," said the teacher.
"How shall I make it?" asked the little boy.
"Why, anyway you like," said the teacher.
"And any color?" asked the little boy.
"Any color," said the teacher.
"If everyone made the same picture,
And used the same colors,
How would I know who made what,
And which was which?"
"I don't know," said the little boy.

And he began to make a red flower with a green stem.
Students prove basic knowledge through fill in the blank, true/false, or basic questioning.

Students apply knowledge (text evidence; lab processes; mathematical equations) to prove their answer.
Students reflect, evaluate, and extend within the discipline.
Students apply synthesized analysis to evaluate real-world problem-solving scenarios.
Rigor/Relevance Framework

Bellringer:

 
Given a set of shapes, identify symmetries


 
Find shapes/things around you that have symmetry


 
Create an animation using Flash that shows symmetry


 

Determine the axis of symmetry for a parabolic equation.

Math

Low

Low

High

High

C

D

B

A

RELEVANCE

R
I
G
O
R

18

Rigor/Relevance Framework

High-level Rigor

High-level Relevance

Students think in complex ways and apply acquired knowledge and skills, even when confronted with perplexing unknowns, to find creative solutions and take action that further develops their skills and knowledge.

Evaluation 6

Synthesis 5

Analysis 4

Application 3

5
Apply to real-world unpredictable situation

4
Apply to real-world predictable situation

3
Apply knowledge across disciplines

podcast
taxonomy
play
exhibit
directions
adaptation
poem
debate
new game
invention
field guide

Products

Verbs


brochure
evaluation
lesson
estimation
solution
experiment
trial
editorial
machine
web site
presentation
advertisement

animate
adapt
compose
create
design
develop
devise
discover
explore
formulate
invent

D Quadrant Verbs and Products

modify
plan
predict
prioritize
propose
publish
rate
recommend
revise
teach
evaluate
defend/critique
Revise a menu and prepare luncheon when four people are require special meals

Raising Level of Rigor: Todays Meet

Prepare luncheon meal for 20 people.

Low

Low

High

High

C

D

B

A

RELEVANCE

R
I
G
O
R

18

Rigor/Relevance Framework

Explain in one or two sentences the major components of quadrant D instruction. Text 86054 and your message to 37607
Key Elements

Anchored in standards
Backwards Design – “Begin with the End in Mind”
Alignment of Instruction and Assessment
Student-centered
Naturally Differentiated

Rigor/Relevance - Instruction
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