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In the late 1950's the Advanced Research Projects Agency (AR

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Loura Mae Vertudazo

on 24 February 2014

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Transcript of In the late 1950's the Advanced Research Projects Agency (AR

Internet History
In the late 1950's the Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA) was founded in the United States with the primary focus of developing information technologies that could survive a nuclear attack.

( Networking the Nerds )In 1967 ARPA University and private sector contractors met with representatives of the Department of Defense to discuss possible protocols for sharing information via computers.

Two years before the calculator was introduced to consumers ( History of the Internet and WWW ) and the year after National Public Radio was established, the precursor of the Internet, ARPANET, was born.
Throughout the 1970's researchers concentrated on developing protocols for controlling networks, moving messages across a system of networks, and allowing for remote access to the networks.

There were computers connected at about two dozen sites when the first email was sent in 1972, but the number of sites and messages soon mushroomed.

By 1975 there were 63 sites.

In 1980, 200 host computers were connecting 20,000 people at university, military, and government locations.

Twelve years later the number of hosts had grown to more than a million internationally ( PBS Timeline ), and in January of 1999 there were more than 43 million. ( Hobbes' Internet Timeline v4.1 )
The TCP/IP protocol was introduced in 1983, and at the University of Wisconsin the name server was developed. The next year domain name server (DNS) was established.

In 1986, the National Science Foundation developed a system to connect the growing number of hosts.
Commercial users now outnumbered research and academic users by a two to one margin, and Bill Gates decided to redefine Microsoft as an Internet company. ( History of the Internet )
Regional networks were connected to a backbone network, which became known as the NSFNET.

As the "Internet" continued to grow and prosper, ARPANET came to an end in 1989 ( PBS Timeline ) just before HTML protocol was introduced in 1990.
As the "Internet" continued to grow and prosper, ARPANET came to an end in 1989 ( PBS Timeline ) just before HTML protocol was introduced in 1990.

HTML allowed graphics to be sent along with text to create hypertext pages customized to the sender's preference. (Networking the Nerds ) Everything was now in place for explosive growth.
COMMERCIAL DEVELOPMENT:

As Tang and Teflon began as curiosities of the space program and later became common consumer products, so too have email, web research, and home shopping on the Web. It has only been ten years since the first relay between a commercial entity (MCI Mail) and the Internet was made.
Since that time technologies have emerged that have fueled the growth of private enterprise on the Web.
1995 saw the introduction of several emerging technologies such as JAVA and JAVAscript, Virtual Environments, and RealAudio which further enhanced the kind of product information which could be made available to consumers. Commercial users now outnumbered research and academic users by a two to one margin, and Bill Gates decided to redefine Microsoft as an Internet company. ( History of the Internet )
As the technology advanced, the Internet became easier to use and the World Wide Web sites became more intricate and inviting.
In 1994 shopping malls arrived on the Net. You could order pizza from Pizza Hut online or bank at First Virtual Bank, the first cyberbank. The advancements came with a downside. Vladimir Levin of Russia became the first publicly known Internet bank robber when he used the Internet to illegally transfer funds to his account.
( Hobbes' Internet Timeline v4.1 )
In 1992 Paul Linder and Mark McCahill at the University of Minnesota released Gopher, a tool that allowed researchers to retrieve specific data from myriad locations. The next year Mosaic, a web browser, was developed at the University of Illinois by Netscape founder Marc Andreesen, the World Wide Web became a public domain, and the Pentium processor was introduced by Intel to speed up the whole process. ( From ARAPNET to
World Wide Web )
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