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Myers-Briggs Type Indicator

Presentation on the test with an overview of Jung's personality type theory
by

Danielle Gagnon

on 11 November 2013

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Transcript of Myers-Briggs Type Indicator

M
yers-
B
riggs
T
ype
I
ndicator

P
erception
becoming aware of the outside world
S
ensing
i
N
tuition
relationships
meanings
possibilities
touch
taste
smell
hearing
sight
The Basics
"The MBTI is a self-report questionnaire designed to make Jung's theory of psychological types understandable and useful in everyday life"
(Myers, 1993, p. 1)
Usefulness of the Theory
Theory
History of the Indicator
People
Objects
Outer World
Events
Applications of the Indicator
Design of the Indicator
"The hypothesis is that certain valuable differences in normal people result from their preferred ways of using perception and judgment."
(Myers & McCaulley, 1986, p. 140)
Population: Adults and high school students with at least an 8th-grade reading level
letter indicating each preference.
number indicating strength/clarity of preference.
Interpretation of scores should be a collaboration between respondent and counselor
"Does this sound like you?"
"Your results indicate ___, does that sound right?"
The indicator does not "measure" anything; rather, it is designed to categorize people based on the preferences they've indicated.
J
udging
T
hinking
F
eeling
Inner World
concepts
ideas
imagination
I
ntroverts prefer to spend their time and energy here.
logical connection of ideas
impersonal
chronology
cause and effect
weighing relative values
subjective
personal
E
xtraverts prefer to spend their time and energy here.
Format: either/or questions (bubble in answer on score sheet), self-administered, untimed.
Form F= experimental (166 items, including research items)
Form G= standard (126 items, higher-weighted questions frontloaded so results are more likely to be accurate if respondents don't finish)
Form AV= abbreviated version (50 questions, self-scoring for groups or other situations in which maximum accuracy can be sacrificed for time-efficiency)
Scoring
*numbers do not imply skill level*
the "shoes-off" self should answer the questions (not the work self, the ideal self, the show-off self, etc.)
2 mental processes:
J
UDGING
P
ERCEIVING
T
hinking
F
eeling
S
ensing
i
N
tuition
"orientation to the outer world"
2 attitudes:
E
xtraversion
I
ntroversion
focus of attention/energy
There are 16 combinations of preferences that describe 16 variations of normal personality types. All are equally valid and valuable, though some are more common than others.
Or, "Why care about personality type?"
"Valuable differences between normal, healty people... can be the source of much misunderstanding and miscommunication."
(Myers, 1993, p. 1)
Understanding personality types can help you:
understand your own strengths and weaknesses
recognize the value in approaches that differ from your own
develop an objective mindset towards subjective values
reduce misunderstandings and miscommunications resulting from differences in preferential styles
cooperate and collaborate more effectively
attuned to incoming information
making decisions
seeking closure
planning
organizing
Preferences for processes, functions, and attitude become differentiated early in life and are influenced by the dynamic interactions between the inner and outer worlds.
Counseling
Education
Career Counseling
It's a personality test based on a theroy.
It's designed to categorize people based on their unconscious preferences. It does not pathologize any of the preferences, even those that occur less frequently.
1921- Jung's book Psychological Types
Katharine Cook Briggs (1875-1968) and her daughter Isabel Briggs Myers (1897-1980) studied and elaborated Jung's ideas and applied them to human interaction, spent 20 years "type watching"
1942- informal development of MBTI began, testing potential items on well-known friends and relatives
Items were organized into Forms that were tested on successively larger populations. Males and females scored separately.
1960ish- Forms E and F scored males and females the same for everything but the TF scale
Form G (current standard) published in 1977
Group/systems approach
Family Therapy
Communication styles
learning styles
teaching styles
couples therapy
teambuilding
management and leadership training
curriculum development
diversity and multicultural training
References
Myers, I.B. (1993). Introduction to type (5th ed.). Palo Alto, CA: Consulting Psychologists Press, Inc.

Myers, I.B., & McCaulley, M.H. (1986). Manual: A guide to the development and use of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (2nd ed.). Palo Alto, CA: Consulting Psychologists Press, Inc.
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