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WELDING THEORY:

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by

Spence Pleskie

on 18 June 2014

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Transcript of WELDING THEORY:

CONSTANT CURRENT
(CC)
vs.
CONSTANT VOLTAGE
(CV)
VARIABLES!
In every welding scenario there are many different variables which will determine the effectivness of the welder, equipment,ans the overall fusion process itself. The following Illustrations will give you a better understanding of the techniques used is various welding processes.
ADVAVCE PROCESS WELDING MACHINES
These state of the art welding machines are capable of welding within AC and DC power. And are fully capable of welding a wide array of parent metals with different processes in either:

CONSTANT CURRENT
or
CONSTANT VOLTAGE
WELDING THEORY:

ELECTRICITY

Welding power sources are designed in many sizes and shapes. They may supply either Alternating Current (AC) or Direct Current (DC) power, or both, and they may have various means of controlling their voltage and amperage output. The reasons for this is that the power source must be capable of producing the proper arc characteristics for the welding process, and application.
From a design and arc control standpoint, there are two fundamentally different types of welding power sources. These include power sources that produce a constant current (CC) output and power sources that produce a constant voltage (CV) output. Multi-process power sources are those that contain additional circuitry and components which allows them to produce both CC and CV output depending on the selected mode.

Note that a welding arc is dynamic, in which current (A) and voltage (V) are changing constantly. The power source is monitoring the arc and making millisecond changes in order to maintain a stable arc condition. The term “constant” is relative. A CC power source will maintain current at a relatively constant level, regardless of fairly large changes in voltage, while a CV power source will maintain voltage at a relatively constant level, regardless of fairly large changes in current. Figure 1 contains graphs of the typical output curves of CC and CV power sources. Notice at various operating points on the output curve in each graph how there is relatively little change in one variable, while fairly large changes in the other variable (“Δ” (delta) = difference).
(CC) (CV)
/
SMAW
Submerged
Metal
Arc
Welding
SMAW
GTAW
GTAW
(CC)
WELDING PROCESSES
"STICK" WELDING
Gas Tungsten Arc Welding
"TIG"
A welding machine that uses current that varies slightly with the changes in voltage. Constant Current or (CC) machines are typically used in Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) and Gas Tungsten Arc Welding or (GMAW).
Submerged Metal Arc Welding

"STICK"
Gas Tungsten Arc Weldng

"TIG"
GMAW
Gas Metal Arc Welding

"MIG"
FCAW
Flux Cored Arc Welding
MCAW
Metal Cored Arc Welding
SAW
Submerged Arc Welding
(CV)
WELDING PROCESSES
A welding machine that uses voltage that varies slightly with changes in current. Constant Voltage or (CV) is often used for Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW), Flux Cored Arc Welding (FCAW), Metal Cored Arc Welding (MCAW), and Submerged Arc Welding (SAW).
"Drooper"
Am I doing
this right?
Thanks for viewing!
Full transcript