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CONNECTIONS ACROSS TEXT: FRANKENSTEIN

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tori moore

on 23 July 2015

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Transcript of CONNECTIONS ACROSS TEXT: FRANKENSTEIN

CONNECTIONS ACROSS TEXT: FRANKENSTEIN
Literature and other examples that inspired or were inspired by Mary Shelley's 1818 novel,
Frankenstein.

19th Century
5th Century
401 - 500
The Creation of Man by Prometheus
- J.M. Hunt



17th Century
1601-1700
Paradise Lost
- John Milton


18th Century
1701-1800
Rime of the Anicent Mariner
- Samuel Taylor Coelridge

The Byronic Hero
1801-1900
The Electric Experiments of Giovanni Aldini

The Body Snatching of William Burke and William Hare

Dracula
by Bram Stoker

Ozymandias
- Percy Bysshe Shelley
20th & 21st Century
1901-Present
The Creation of Man by Prometheus
and
Frankenstein
J.M. Hunt
500
The Creation of man by Prometheus
was a direct inspiration to Mary Shelley for
Frankenstein
. In fact, the second name for
Frankenstein
is
The Modern Prometheus
. Prometheus was supposedly the wisest among the Titans, according to Greek Mythology. Victor Frankenstein, too, is very wise, and appears to be the most intelligent character in the story. Prometheus and Frankenstein are both linked to lightening and electricity by fascination. In the same way that Frankenstein tried to "play God" by creating human life, Prometheus did so by bringing fire to man after playing a trick on Zeus. The actions of both were met with eternal punishment, constant fear and ill-being for Frankenstein, and the torture of Prometheus by being tied up and having his liver eaten by an eagle every day .
Paradise Lost
and
Frankenstein
John Milton
1667
Rime of the Ancient Mariner
and
Frankenstein
Samuel Taylor Coelridge
1797
In
Paradise Lost
, Satan tries to overthrow God and reign control, feeling that he has the intelligence and power to do so. Victor Frankenstein is, in a way, overthrowing God and trying to be in control when he creates the monster. Satan is also arrogant, which resembles Frankenstein when he feels the life he creates will be great and superior. Satan has faith in himself that he can overthrow God and does not realize that God has the ultimate power in the same way that Victor Frankenstein has faith in his own scientific knowledge that he can create human life and does not think it will turn badly for him. The motives of both Satan and Victor Frankenstein are self-serving. Satan's motivation for defying God is simply due to his rebellious and arrogant nature. Frankenstein's desire to experiment and love of science are the only things motivating him, he has no intentions of creating big medical advances, or anything else that could be selfless. Neither character's actions are depicted as positive.
Frankenstein's monster personally relates to Satan and Adam in
Paradise Lost
, which he realizes while he is reading it in hiding. Both he and Satan have been abandoned by their creator, creating feelings of resentment by default. The monster and Adam both do bad things that they would not necissarily normally do. The monster strangles William Frankenstein out of rage and Adam eats the apple only because he is tempted. When looking at this
Paradise Lost
from the creature's point of view, Victor Frankenstein resembles God because he is the creator in this story.
As for the relationship between Satan and Beelzebub, this resembles Victor Frankenstein and Henry Clerval's relationship. Beelzebub is used as a voice of reason for Satan to be the logical member of the duo and question Satan's faulty plans. Beelzebub tries to talk Satan out of overthrowing God. Henry Clerval mirrors Beelzebub by acting as a foil to highlight the imperfections of Victor by appearing as "too good to be true." Victor describes Henry with nothing but positivity,
Byronic Hero
(Named after) Lord Byron
c. early 1800s
The idea of a "Byronic Hero" stems from 19th century romantic author, Lord Byron, or, George Gordon Byron. Byronic Heroes, often based off of Byron himself, are rebellious, imperfect, yet intelligent men with mysterious personalities and a tall, dark, and handsome appearance. Byronic Heroes reject social norms and tend to alienate or focus on themselves.Other traits include being highly emotional, arrogant, and manipulative. These characters are constantly traveling and always have a dark, tragic past that still haunts them either internally and/or externally. These problems they face are caused by themselves.
The poem
Rime of the Ancient Mariner
not only inspired Frankenstein, but is directly quoted in the book. When Shelley uses the quote "Like one, on a loathsome road who,/ Doth walk in fear and dread,/ And, having once turned round, walks on,/And turns no more his head;/ Because he knows a frightful fiend/ Doth close behind him tread," from the poem when she wants to describe Frankenstein's paranoia caused by the creation and release of his monster. Frankenstein's fear of his own creation haunts him in the same way that the ancient Mariner still fears that he will face further punishment than what he has already received for killing the Albatross.
Victor Frankenstein
as a
Byronic Hero
Mary Shelley
1818
Victor Frankenstein is considered a Byronic Hero because of certain traits he possesses. Even though he is not tall, dark, and handsome, most of the other traits match well with him. Frankenstein is very intelligent and engrossed in furthering his education in science. He spends all of his time experimenting, researching and working toward his creation. Frankenstein's emotions are always very strong and change frequently. Throughout the novel, Frankenstein travels to many different places including Ingolstadt, London, Scotland, Mont Blac, and near the north pole. The primary reason that he is a Byronic Hero is that he is haunted by his dark past caused by the creation of his monster. He is constantly reminded of his past because the monster kills everyone he loves.
Herbert West: Reanimator
and
Frankenstein
H.P. Lovecraft
1921
Herbert West: Reanimator
by H.P. Lovecraft
William Burke and William Hare
and
Victor Frankenstein
William Burke and William Hare were two serial killers from the 19th century. At first, they were "body snatchers" who dug up graves and stole corpses from them in order to supply a local anatomist, Dr. Robert Knox with fresh corpses to work on. In return, they received profit from him. Eventually, these crimes backfired when they were caught and punished. Victor Frankenstein, too, was a body snatcher. In his case, he was driven by science and curiosity, not profit. He dug up graves to find corpses for his creation. His actions also come back to haunt them, just like they did for Burke and Hare, when his monster begins killing people and he becomes afraid.
The Electric Experiments of Giovanni Aldini
and
Frankenstein
Giovanni Aldini was a scientist who practiced galvanism, inspired by his uncle Luigi Galvani. Galvanism is the use therapeutic of electricity on, in Aldini's case, both animals and humans. Aldini started out with animals and even performed these experiments in front of a crowd. He later turned to humans when he was granted permission to experiment on murderer, Goerge Forster. Victor Frankenstein used galvanism to bring his creation to life. He creates an apparatus that will conduct electricity from the lightning during a storm to his corpse. Unlike Aldini's experiments, Frankenstein is actually successful.
The Creation of Man by Prometheus
and
Paradise Lost
Non-literature that inspired or connects with Frankenstein
Key
: Main Ideas have
White
background
Sub-connections/Branches have
Grey
background

Main Ideas
= how one thing inspires/is inspired by Mary Shelley's Frankenstein
Sub-connections
= how those inspirations connect with each other
Things that
INSPIRED
Frankenstein

Things
INSPIRED

BY
Frankenstein

The Hunchback of Notre Dame
and
Frankenstein
Disney/Victor Hugo
1996/1831
The Hunchback of Notre Dame -Walt Disney movie (based on 1831 novel by Victor Hugo)
The movie
The Hunchback of Notre Dame
is based off of a Gothic novel with the same name. In the movie, the main character Quasimodo relates to Frankenstein's monster physically. They both have deformities, especially on their faces, which cause fear. Quasimodo isolates himself in Notre Dame's bell tower where he can still see the townsfolk, while Frankenstein hides from the De Lacey family but still observes them. The Gothic novel's ending is much darker than the happy ending of the movie, considering the movie was intended for children. In the book, Quasimodo dies with his beloved friend Esmerelda, in the same way that when Victor Frankenstein dies, his monster passes shortly after due to suicide.
Satan, the main character in
Paradise Lost
and Prometheus, the main character of
The Creation of Man by Prometheus
are both rebellious. They both defy their leaders and are punished; Satan is sent to hell and Prometheus is tortured. At the time of their condemning actions, both feel that they are more powerful than those above them, but later find this to not be the truth.
Dracula
and
Frankenstein
Frankenstein's Monster and Dracula are very similar. The monster kills everyone Victor loves one by one without them even knowing who he is. Dracula's identity is hidden throughout the story as well because none of the men on the ship know who else could be there with them and Dracula only attacks at night. The protagonists, Victor Frankenstein and the captain in Dracula, also the narrator, are haunted throughout their stories by the antagonists, the monster and Dracula. They both feel constant imminent danger because of these protagonists and feel like it is only a matter of time before they are next. Their assumptions are correct, as these creatures do eventually catch up to them; the monster meets Frankenstein in the North Pole and the captain was the last one on the boat with Dracula so the captain knows he will die from him because he cannot leave his ship and he knows Dracula is coming.
Both stories are also in epistolary format. Dracula is told in a series of journal entries, while a portion of Frankenstein is told through letters.
Victor Frankenstein and Herbert West both try to "play God" by creating human life. They both are intelligent medical students who are very engrossed in their studies and experiments. Their experiments both lead to the creation of life; Victor uses multiple corpses to make one body while Herbert takes one corpse at a time to carry out his vision. Both characters had a less-involved friend/accomplice; Victor's was Henry and Herbert West's was the narrator of the story. Victor and Herbert's creations both turn against their creators at some point and also end up killing multiple people. Victor and Herbert both seem to lack compassion for their creations at most points in the story. A laboratory is used in both settings.
Carrie
- movie
Carrie
and
Frankenstein
1976
Carrie
is a movie about a girl in high school who becomes an outcast because she is completely different than other girls in her high school, a result of her overbearing mother. Frankenstein's monster is also outcast because of Victor Frankenstein creating him in the first place. Both Carrie and the monster's "creators" even shun them at some point. Carrie and the monster both have good intentions and try to be nice to people but end up being bullied and mistreated anyway. After being made fun of and abused so much, both characters eventually take action; the monster kills everyone Victor loves and Carrie kills her classmates.
Lord of the Flies
- William Golding
Late 1700s-1800s
mid 1800s
Piggy
and
Frankenstein's Monster
1954
Piggy was one of the main characters in Lord of the Flies, a story about schoolboys who become stranded on an island and must fend for themselves. Piggy is a character who is different from the other boys because of appearance and personality. He is overweight and wears thick glasses and seems to be the only intelligent boy on the island. He is easy to pick on and overpower, so he is ultimately shut down by the rest of the boys every time he tries to speak up. Even though he never does anything wrong to the boys, they are evil to Piggy and are even violent toward him, which results in his death. Frankenstein is also judged by his different appearance and bullied, even in a violent manner. Even when Frankenstein is nice, he is still mistreated.
1897
Ozymandias
Percy Bysshe Shelley
1826
The poem
Ozymandias
is about a statue that has been withered away by nature. The statue says it is almighty and challenges even the mightiest existing to look around at all it has done. The reality is that everything around it has been turned to sand and destroyed by nature. The statue did not believe anyone, even nature, could defeat it and this situation shows that nature always runs its course. Nature runs its course in
Frankenstein
when Victor tries to "play God" by creating life and believing that he would successfully outsmart nature when in reality, his creation came back to haunt him.
By: Tori Moore
Frankenstein
Mary Shelley
1818
Frankenstein is a renowned 19th century Gothic/Science fiction novel that has been impacting society for years. Mary Shelley had many resources, including 4 skillful authors with whom she makes references to in Frankenstein. These authors are her husban, Percy Bysshe Shelley, Lord Byron, Erasmus Darwin,and Samuel Taylor Coleridge. Their work influene Mary Shelley greatly. A nightmare about her late child coming back to life is another inspiration for the novel.
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