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Coordinated School Health

A project by Maegan Chapman & Marc Ross for South College course HLT4010
by

Marc Ross

on 14 April 2014

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Transcript of Coordinated School Health

To increase awareness of mental illness as an important public health problem and the importance of mental health promotion and mental illness prevention.
Short Term:
To obtain better scientific information on mental health/mental illness through surveillance, epidemiology, and prevention research.
To translate research findings into disease prevention programs, policies, and systems.
To communicate research findings to appropriate audiences, including primary health care professionals, policy makers, and the public health community who work in disease prevention and health promotion.
Long Term:
To support full integration of mental health promotion and mental illness prevention and treatment with other disease prevention programs.
MENTAL HEALTH - GOALS OF THE CDC
COUNSELING,
PSYCHOLOGICAL & SOCIAL SERVICES

Provide technical assistance and evaluate the effect of nutrition standards for foods marketed to children
Reduce sodium levels in processed and restaurant foods
Reduce trans fat in the food supply
Research and evaluate the effect of front-of-package labeling
Increase the number of people who meet the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans
NUTRITION, PHYSICAL & OBESITY - GOALS OF THE CDC
WHY ADDRESS IT IN SCHOOLS?
According to Benjamin Franklin in 1749,
Pennsylvania should establish a public school that places as much emphasis on physical as on intellectual fitness because “exercise invigorates the soul as well as the body.”
A brief history
before the history.

Profile: School District of Random Lake: Random Lake, Wisconsin
The Who, What, Where, When & Why of it all.
COORDINATED
SCHOOL
HEALTH

CSH TARGETS 5 CRITICAL HEALTH BEHAVIORS
NUTRITION SERVICES
NUTRITION
SERVICES

Inadequate physical activity
Unhealthy eating
Tobacco, alcohol, and drug-use prevention
Sexual behaviors that could result in sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and unintended pregnancies
Behaviors that contribute to unintended injuries or violence
Tennessee ranks sixth highest in the nation for rates of pediatric obesity.

51% of Tennessee high school students reported having tried smoking.

82% of Tennessee high school students reported not eating the recommended daily servings of fruits and vegetables.

40% of Tennessee high school students reported having had sex with more than one person.

23% of Tennessee high school students had consumed alcohol.
Schools should provide access to a variety of nutritious and appealing meals that accommodate the health and nutrition needs of all students. School nutrition programs reflect the U.S. Dietary Guidelines for Americans and other criteria to achieve nutrition integrity. The school nutrition services offer students a learning laboratory for classroom nutrition and health education, and serve as a resource for linkages with nutrition-related community services. Qualified child nutrition professionals provide these services.
SCENARIO
What does it look
like in schools?
THE CDC
TRENDS
LEGISLATION
National
EXAMPLE
#1
EXAMPLE
#2
EXAMPLE
#3
HEALTH &
EDUCATION

Numbers, numbers
and even more numbers
RESEARCH & STATISTICS
MENTAL
HEALTH
An overview
WHY ADDRESS IT IN SCHOOLS?
Because politicians have to feel like they're doing something.
LEGISLATION
What came before CSH?
Profile: New Urban High School: Milwaukie, Oregon
Profile: Cincinnati Public School District: Cincinnati, Ohio
These services are provided to improve students’ mental, emotional, and social health and include individual and group assessments, interventions, and referrals. Organizational assessment and consultation skills of counselors and psychologists contribute not only to the health of students but also to the health of the school environment. Professionals such as certified school counselors, psychologists, and social workers provide these services.
99% of all schools systems have updated, or are updating, their policies to comply with the USDA’s Wellness Policy.

The percentage of schools that stopped selling empty calorie sugar drinks rose from 26.7% to 74%. This placed Tennessee 2nd in the nation for these efforts.

65% of secondary schools sold only foods that met the minimum nutrition guidelines.

Several Tennessee schools were recently nationally recognized by the USDA for their use of best practices in association with quality of nutrition initiatives.

116 registered dietitians have been employed by participating LEAs.
COUNSELING/MENTAL HEALTH
As schools have increasingly been mandated to serve the needs of all children (including those who are emotionally disturbed) general health and mental health services have been increasingly placed in them.

Although the provision of basic health care in schools began in the early part of the century, the concept of providing comprehensive services, in which mental health services are integrated into primary medical care, has only been implemented recently.
OREA-Offices of Research and Education Accountability TENNESSEE COMPTROLLER OF THE TREASURY, JUSTIN P. WILSON
Legislative Brief: Coordinated School Health Phillip Doss, Director (615) 401-7869/ Phillip.Doss@tn.gov
School-based mental health services in the united states: History, current models and needs
Lois T. Flaherty M.D., Mark D. Weist Ph.D., Beth S. Warner Ph.D.
OREA-Offices of Research and Education Accountability TENNESSEE COMPTROLLER OF THE TREASURY, JUSTIN P. WILSON
Legislative Brief: Coordinated School Health Phillip Doss, Director (615) 401-7869/ Phillip.Doss@tn.gov
OREA-Offices of Research and Education Accountability TENNESSEE COMPTROLLER OF THE TREASURY, JUSTIN P. WILSON
Legislative Brief: Coordinated School Health Phillip Doss, Director (615) 401-7869/ Phillip.Doss@tn.gov
WHY SCHOOLS?
The health of young people is strongly linked to their academic success, and the academic success of youth is strongly linked with their health. Thus, helping students stay healthy is a fundamental part of the mission of schools. After all, schools cannot achieve their primary mission of education if students and staff are not healthy.
WHY SCHOOL HEALTH?
Coordinating the many parts of school health into a systematic approach can enable schools to
•Eliminate gaps and reduce redundancies across the many initiatives and funding streams
•Build partnerships and teamwork among school health and education professionals in the school
•Build collaboration and enhance communication among public health, school health, and other education and health professionals in the community
•Focus efforts on helping students engage in protective, health-enhancing behaviors and avoid risk behaviors
MEASURABLE EFFECTS
Measurable Effects of a Coordinated School Health Program:
•Improved attendance and achievement
•Less tobacco use
•Lower rates of teenage pregnancy
•Increased participation in physical fitness activities
•Greater interest in healthier diets
•Increased use of school health and counseling services
•Decreased disciplinary problems
•Increased awareness and involvement by families and community in health needs of student
http://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth/cshp/case.htm
Coordinated School Health
Health & Academics
Tools & Training
SHPPS, School Health Profiles & School Connectedness
THE WHO
NFSI
The Global Student Health Study
RAAPP
Capacity & Training
Short & Long Term
The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA)
Section 4101(a) of the Affordable Care Act allows for SBHCs to access $200 million in competitive federal funds over the next four years. The grants are limited to facilities expenditures -- such as the acquisition or improvement of land, construction costs, equipment, and similar expenditures.
State Children’s Health Insurance Program (SCHIP)
Section 505 of the bill reflects a significant step forward for school-based health centers – the first explicit recognition of SBHCs as a potential provider of SCHIP services. The provision clarifies that a state may “…provide child health assistance for covered items and services that is furnished through school-based health centers.”
The Healthy Schools Act of 2009
Requires states find mechanisms to fund school-based health centers under the Children’s Health Insurance Program and Medicaid.
Requirement to Provide Services: Code 49-6-303 (1999)
Identification of Students with Mental or Emotional Disorders: Code 49-6-303
Substance Abuse: Code 49-6-4213 (2000)
Suicide Prevention: Code 49-6-3004 (2007)
Across states, increases were found in the median percentage of schools in which the lead health education teacher wanted to receive professional development on alcohol- or other drug-use prevention
(from 52.4% to 74.8%)
, emotional and mental health
(from 51.8% to 73.1%)
, HIV prevention
(from 52.3% to 64.7%)
, human sexuality
(from 50.8% to 65.5%)
, injury prevention and safety
(from 33.7% to 62.4%)
, nutrition and dietary behavior
(from 47.2% to 72.6%)
, physical activity and fitness
(from 38.6% to 68.4%)
, pregnancy prevention
(from 47.2% to 63.1%)
, STD prevention
(from 54.6% to 65.7%)
, suicide prevention
(from 66.6% to 75.8%)
, tobacco-use prevention
(from 45.0% to 65.6%)
, and violence prevention
(62.2% to 75.9%)
.
Long - 1996-2010
Across states, the median percentage of schools in which teachers tried to increase student knowledge on asthma increased from
47.0% to 53.5%
, that allowed students to purchase snack foods or beverages from vending machines or at a school store, canteen, or snack bar decreased from
78.3% to 70.5%
, that allowed students to purchase sports drinks from vending machines or at the school store, canteen, or snack bar decreased from
59.2% to 49.6%
, that had an asthma action plan on file for all students with known asthma increased from
46.1% to 57.7%
, that provided additional psychosocial counseling or support services as needed to students with poorly controlled asthma increased from
46.3% to 52.0%
, among schools that had one or more than one group (e.g., a school health council, committee, or team) that offered guidance on the development of policies or coordinated activities on health topics, the median percentage with representatives from local government agencies on any of these groups increased from
15.4% to 23.8%
, increases were found in the median percentage of schools that have adopted a policy that addresses maintaining confidentiality of HIV-infected students (
from 72.1% to 77.7%
) and confidential counseling for HIV-infected students (
from 57.1% to 62.9%
).
Short - 2007-2010
http://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth/profiles/2010/profiles_report.pdf
http://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth/profiles/2010/profiles_report.pdf
ADVOCATES
EXAMPLE
#4
Profile: Gibson County Special School District: Dyer, Tennessee
Simple: After the family, the school is the primary institution responsible for the mental development of young people in the United States.
NUTRITION
SERVICES
An overview
SCENARIO
What does it look
like in schools?
Numbers, numbers
and even more numbers
RESEARCH & STATISTICS
Because politicians have to feel like they're doing something.
LEGISLATION
Profile: Fairfax County Public Schools, Fairfax, Virginia
EXAMPLE
#1
Profile: Fayette County Public Schools, Lexington, Kentucky
EXAMPLE
#2
Simple: Nutrition is one of the single most important factors when it comes to a child’s development. Proper nutrition is essential for children to succeed in school.
Surely health was a concern prior to 1987?
NUTRITION
COUNSELING/MENTAL HEALTH
USDOE awarded the OCSH (TN) a $301,100 grant that enabled LEAs (Local Education Agencies) to create behavioral health policies, form community partnerships, and provide staff awareness training.
OREA-Offices of Research and Education Accountability TENNESSEE COMPTROLLER OF THE TREASURY, JUSTIN P. WILSON
Legislative Brief: Coordinated School Health Phillip Doss, Director (615) 401-7869/ Phillip.Doss@tn.gov
Research shows high prevalence rates for school-aged children’s mental health disorders and a significant correlational data between children with mental health disorders and decreased student achievement. Despite these key findings, standards generated by the field of school leadership are void of any direct expectations related to children’s mental health. In other words, programs preparing school leaders may not offer any content related to children’s mental health, which could inhibit principals’ leadership abilities when it comes to school’s mental health needs.
http://d-scholarship.pitt.edu/13476/1/FINALDissCaparelli080712.pdf
Sielke M. Caparelli - SCHOOL LEADERSHIP AND SCHOOL MENTAL HEALTH: AN EXPLORATORY STUDY OF SMH CONTENT IN THE PREPARATION OF PRINCIPALS
Nutrition, Physical Activity, Obesity, and Food Safety

• Reduce the proportion of children and adolescents age 2-19 who are obese by 5%.
• Increase the proportion of infants who are breastfed by 15%.
• Reduce foodborne illness caused by Salmonella by 12.5%.
• Reduce foodborne illness caused by Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O157:H7 by 29%.
2015 TARGETS
THE END
WHO's Global School Health Initiative, launched in 1995, seeks to mobilize and strengthen health promotion and education activities at the local, national, regional and global levels. The Initiative is designed to improve the health of students, school personnel, families and other members of the community through schools.

The goal of WHO's Global School Health Initiative is to increase the number of schools that can truly be called "Health-Promoting Schools". Although definitions will vary, depending on need and circumstance, a Health-Promoting School can be characterised as a school constantly strengthening its capacity as a healthy setting for living, learning and working.
THE GOAL OF THE WHO
Profile: Powell United Methodist Church Childcare, Powell TN
EXAMPLE
#3
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