Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Blended Learning Case Study Analysis

No description
by

Jessica L

on 30 March 2014

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Blended Learning Case Study Analysis

Context & Identified Need
Steps Taken to Fulfill Need
Implementation & Assessment
Application to My Context
Personal Analysis
Benefits & Success Factors
University of Illinois (UIS)

Education Leadership Masters Program (EDL) already has one online program
12 full-time faculty teaching online

Enhance student recruitment
Reduce travel time by 50%

Retain hallmarks of F2F program
Critical discourse
Higher-order thinking
CoI and Practical Inquiry Phase was used in my Blended Learning Plan for BYOT Intermediate/Advanced course
The need for rubrics to drive and evaluate course design
Currently use adapted version of iNACOL's rubric for in-house course review: http://tinyurl.com/la48fus
Key success factor was faculty members' experience with online learning
Need to provide PD to ensure blended teachers have background knowledge
Partnership between online learning department and instructional technology department
Access to technology is important (Fishman et al., 2001) *Elaboration via video --------------------->
Transition F2F Administrative Leadership to blended
Use Quality Matters (QM) course design model
Link Community of Inquiry framework (CoI) with QM rubric
Link QM to CoI to design EACH course in the program
Checkpoints with instructional designers
Each course incorporated discussion forums
Modeling workshop for faculty on appropriate questioning
Clinical course required e-portfolio with reflections
Assessment is in progress at time of publication
Survey for every course
Blended Learning: Reconnecting with the Capital Region (p. 62)
Optional mid-term survey specific to the course
Student perception
Drives immediate changes to course
Dialectic/questioning (Picciano et al., 2009) incorporated through discussion forums
Focused on questioning techniques
Synthesis and evaluation (Picciano et al., 2009) incorporated through ePortfolios
Practical Inquiry Phase (Garrison & Vaughan, 2008) was utilized to design courses
Cognitive presence was important emphasis in case study
Faculty have experience both online and F2F
"...important to make sure that instructors and course designers have some experience teaching face-to-face and online" (p. 62)
QM is a recursive design tool
Peer-review
Rubric
"Explicit guidelines for developing blended courses are an important of support" (p. 62)
Jessica Levene
University of Florida
Bogle, L., Cook, V., Day, S., & Swan, K.(2009). Blended program development: Applying Quality Matters and Community of Inquiry framework to ensure high quality design & implementation.
Journal of the Research Center for Educational Technology, 5(
2), 51-66.


Blended Learning:
Case Study Analysis
Blumenfeld, P., Fishman, B.J., & Krajcik, J. (2000). Creating usable innovations in systemic reform: Scaling up technology-embedded project-based science in urban school. Educational Psychologist, 35(3), 149-164.

Bogle, L., Cook, V., Day, S., & Swan, K.(2009). Blended program development: Applying Quality Matters and Community of Inquiry framework to ensure high quality design & implementation.
Journal of the Research Center for Educational Technology, 5(
2), 51-66.

Fishman, B., Marx, R. W., Blumenfeld, J., Krajcik, J., & Soloway, E. (2004). Creating a framework for research on systemic technology innovations. Journal of the Learning Sciences, 13(1), 43-76. doi: 10.1207/s15327809jls1301_3

Garrison, D.R. & Vaughan, N.D. (2008). Blended learning in higher education: framework, principles, and guidelines. San Francisco, CA: Jossey- Bass.

Levene, J., & Boulware, D. (2013). Sustaining innovation through online professional development: A design approach. In M. Searson & M. Ochoa (Eds.), Proceedings of Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2014 (pp. 2670-2575). Chesapeake, VA: AACE.

Picciano, A. G., Dzubian, C. D., & Graham, C. R. (2013). Blended learning in higher education: Frameworks, principles, and guidelines. San Francisco, CA: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
References
Full transcript