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Close Reading and Figurative Language

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by

Ashley Smith

on 12 February 2014

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Transcript of Close Reading and Figurative Language

Close Reading and Figurative Language
Do Now:
Please answer the questions, on your "Do Now" worksheet, to the best of your ability.
3.
Ebenezer Scrooge is a penny-pinching miser in the first degree. He cares nothing for the people around him and mankind exists only for the money that can be made through exploitation and intimidation. He particularly detests Christmas which he views as 'a time for finding yourself a year older, and not an hour richer'. Scrooge is visited, on Christmas Eve, by the ghost of his former partner Jacob Marley who died seven Christmas Eves ago.
Marley, a miser from the same mold as Scrooge, is suffering the consequences in the afterlife and hopes to help Scrooge avoid his fate. He tells Scrooge that he will be haunted by three spirits. The ghost of Christmas past, present, and future will visit Scrooge and try to show Scrooge the error in his ways.



4.
Chunk
Check your work!
1. Simile
The sentence compares the over-baked cookies to rocks using the word "as"
2. Personification
The sentence states that the trees are "watching" over Katniss. Trees are non-human, and they cannot watch someone. Therefore, this is the attribution of the human characteristics to a non-human thing.
3. Metaphor
This sentence presents a comparison between to unlike things: a storm and a savage beast.
Note
: the sentence does not use "like" or "as"
4. Personification
The wind, a non-human thing, cannot literally carry the scent of lilacs.
5. Simile
The sentence makes the comparison between a ball and a bullet. The comparison uses "like"
6. Onomatopoeia-
The sentence uses the word "buzzed", which is an onomatopoeic word.
What is the difference between literal language and figurative language?
Literal
The text means exactly what it says.
Figurative
Figurative language uses similes, metaphors, onomatopoeia and personification to describe something often through comparison with something different.
Write an example of a literal sentence and a figurative sentence.
Example:
The grass looks green.
The sand feels rough.
The flower smells sweet.
Example:
The grass looks like spiky green hair.
Have you ever read a text that was difficult to understand?

Did you feel frustrated because you did not understand what you read?

What was the text?

Why didn’t you understand it?

Pictured on the left is Ebenezer Scrooge.
He is the main character in
A Christmas Carol
by Charles Dickens.
What do you think Scrooge is like?
Is he a nice man, or a mean man?
What do you think will happen to him in the story? Why?
Let's Read!
1. Number the paragraphs in the left margin.

2.Circle words that you do not know.

3. Underline figurative language used in the text; underline metaphor, simile, alliteration, onomatopoeia, hyperbole, and personification.

A Christmas Carol
by Charles Dickens

BUILDING BACKGROUND
WHAT IS CLOSE READING?
Close reading is a careful and purposeful re-reading of a text.
Anticipation Guide:
YOUR TURN!
1.
Read the poem
Close reading requires multiple readings....
Have a conversation with the text!
Ask questions!
silently.
2.
Read the poem
aloud.
Number the lines of the poem in the left margin.
the text.
Draw a horizontal line where there are natural breaks.
In a poem with stanzas, the lines would go in between the stanzas.
CHUNK # 1
CHUNK #2
CHUNK #3
CHUNK #4
CHUNK #5
CHUNK #6
Can you explain each chunk in your own words?
5.
Circle unknown words.
clear or transparent; resembling crystal.
Crystal (adj)
6.
Underline figurative language.
Look for:
simile:
metaphor:
personification:
TO THIS DAY
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