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The history of nail polish :)

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by

steve bacon

on 11 March 2014

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Transcript of The history of nail polish :)

The history of nail polish :)
Although people continued to stain, lacquer and manicure their nails throughout the years, there weren't many notable changes until the early 20th century. In the 1920's glossy car paint was created which gave one bright lady the fab idea of applying it to nails.
70's nails went natural or super deep.
It began in India during the bronze age where they stained their nails with henna.
In the 50's they wore red
In the 60' pastels came into vogue.
The fashionable Egyptian women made red nails famous throughout history.
The Chinese took the trend further by crushing flower petals & creating unique colors.
80's things went neon
The 1910's started super fashionable and with the advent of WWI a more natural look became prominent as the war dismantled frivolous industries & created physical jobs for women.
The 50's are known for Silver Screen and beauties like Marilyn Monroe were in their prime.
The ancient Chinese used a mixture of egg whites, gelatin, beeswax, gum arabic, alum and flower petals for their color.
They were also less tolerant and nail coloring of any type was reserved for royal classes only.
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