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Ideas that Shaped the Colonial View on Government

Section 3.2
by

Frank McCormick

on 28 March 2016

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Transcript of Ideas that Shaped the Colonial View on Government

Ideas that Shaped Colonial Views on Government
Natural Law
A universal set of moral principles believed to come from human's basic sense of right and wrong (can be applied to any culture).
Natural Rights
Rights that all people have by virtue of being human. (also called individual rights)
Popular Sovereignty
the principle that the people are the ultimate source of the authority and legitimacy of a government.
Representative Government
a political system in which power is exercised by elected leaders who work in the interests of the people
Rule of Law
The principle that government is based on clear and fairly enforced laws and that no one is above the law.
Limited Government
a political system in which the powers exercised by the government are restricted, usually by a written constitution
These colonists are signing the Declaration of Independence. They're about to risk everything they have: safety, property, and life, because they believe so strongly in what they are standing for...
These men were once colonists, and are now soldiers- fighting against their former country: Great Britain. They are risking their lives to fight for what they believe...
The question is: Why are these colonists taking such bold and risky actions. What are they thinking? Why do they think the way they do?
It is because they have been influenced by
IDEAS
.

Ideas are dangerous! They get people to think outside the box, to try new things, to act in ways they've never acted before...
Ideas can change your entire outlook on life. They can change who you are... They can get you to risk your life, liberty, and property for something greater than yourself...
Most of the world is familiar with Jesus Christ, a Jew born into Palestine during a time of cruelty and injustice. He had many IDEAS that changed the world... Ideas that people believed in so strongly they would risk their lives for them...
Later, many Christians who believed so strongly in the IDEAS of Jesus Christ, Christians that had been shaped by those IDEAS, gave their life for them...
So, why then did so many colonists give their lives to declare independence from Great Britain? What IDEAS could have driven them to declare independence and why did they believe in those ideas so strongly?
Do we naturally know what is right and wrong or do we have to be taught it? Basically, do you agree that there are natural laws?
Some believe that natural laws come from God, others believed they are programmed into our genetic code... What do you think?
The Founding Fathers believed our rights came from God and that because they came from God, they could NEVER be taken away. No matter what!
A Government is only legitimate when their power comes from the people!
Sovereignty- supreme power
We don't vote on issues, we vote for people that will represent us (Congress)
Remember: Government without control is like a dragon on the loose!
Constitutions "limit" the government by protecting our rights... Like a chain collar on the dragon...
NO ONE IS ABOVE THE LAW!
Separation of Powers
The idea that the powers of government should be split between two or more independent branches so that one group doesn't get too much power
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