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The tragedy of Julius Caesar :Supernatural Occurrences

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makayla caldwell

on 24 April 2015

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Transcript of The tragedy of Julius Caesar :Supernatural Occurrences

"A Lioness whelped in the streets"
(Act 2, Scene 2)
A Lion was giving birth in the streets.
"Graves have yawn'd and yielded up their death"
(Act 2, Scene 2)
Other Supernatural Themes In Shakespeare
Took advantage of audiences superstitious belief in supernatural
Popular Demand
Supernatural Occurrence
There is a super natural occurrence in a play by Shakespeare called Macbeth. Three witches appear in the beggining scenes of the play.
"A common slave--you know him well by sight--
Held up his left hand, which did flame and burn
Like twenty torches join'd, and yet his hand,
Not sensible of fire, remain'd unscorch'd."
The slave who was completely insensible to his hand blazing away like twenty torches burning together and not being scorched at all. He did not react to the fire, he didn't even burn.
The tragedy of Julius Caesar
Theme
The theme of the play,
The Tragedy of Julius Caesar
is the supernatural occurrences that affected the people of Rome. Shakespeare has included supernatural elements in "Julius Caesar" to create an awesome effect in the minds of his contemporary audience by taking advantage of their superstitious beliefs in the supernatural.
Act 4, Scene 3
Ghost: "Thy evil spirit, Brutus."
Brutus: "Why com'st thou?"
Ghost: "To tell thee thou shalt see me at Philippi."
Brutus: " Well; then I shall see thee again?"
Ghost: "Ay, at Philippi."
Brutus: "Why, I will see thee at Philippi then."

Works Cited
"William Shakespeare – Julius Caesar Act 2 Scene 1." Genius. Web. 23 Apr. 2015. <http://genius.com/William-shakespeare-julius-caesar-act-2-scene-1-annotated>.
"Describe the Supernatural Events in Julius Caesar. How Effective Are They in the Play? - Homework Help - ENotes.com." Enotes.com. Enotes.com. Web. 23 Apr. 2015. <http://www.enotes.com/homework-help/describe-supernatural-events-julius-caesar-how-125817>.
"Literature out Loud." » Supernatural Elements in Shakespeare's Plays. Web. 23 Apr. 2015. <http://pausaiz2.blogs.uv.es/shakespeare-paper-1/supernatural-elements-in-shakespeare’s-plays>
The graves have opened
and the dead had risen.
Casca: "For I believe they are portentous things unto the climate that they point upon." (Act 1 Scene 3)
Supernatural Occurences
Supernatural Occurences
Many of Shakespeare plays contain supernatural occurences. He made the unreal interact with reality.
What Casca was saying in this part of Act 1 Scene 3 is that bad omens for the place where they occur
Supernatural
Brutus interacts with ghost of Caesar. Caesar warns him about the future.
Julius Ceasar Rap
By: Adrizzy
Full transcript