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NYFA Analytical Moves

Lesson Plan for Chapter 3: Five Analytical Moves
by

Janelle DolRayne

on 2 February 2017

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Transcript of NYFA Analytical Moves

What is Analysis?
We are going to define
analysis as the search
for
meaningful patterns.

Critical Thinking and Research Analysis
"Analysis is a form of detective work that typically pursues something puzzling, something you seek to understand rather than something you believe you already know." - Rosenwasser and Stephen,
Writing Analytically
Analytical Toolkit
Move 1:
Suspend judgement.
Move 2:
Make the implicit explicit
Move 3:
Look for patterns of repetition and contrast, and for anomalies.
Move 4:
List possible effects of your
observations from moves 1-3.
Move 5:
Keep reformulating questions and explanations.
What would be some better words to use in response?
What I find _________ about.....
Move One:
Suspending Judgment
Practice responding without using the words
like/dislike
or
agree/disagree
. Those words immediately lead us to judgment and will end our exploration and analysis before it starts to get interesting.
Move 2:
Make the implicit explicit
Move 3:
Look for patterns of repetition
and contrast and for anomalies


What repeats?
What goes with what? (Strands)
What is opposed to what? (Binaries)
What doesn't fit?(Anomalies)
Move 4:
List possible effects
of your observations
Practice using the Analytical Triangle on Otto Dix's "War Cripples." 1920. Oil on Canvas. Originally Exhibited in the First International Dada Fair, Berlin. Location unknown, believed to have been destroyed in World War II.

Move 5:
Keep reformulating
questions and explanations.
Analysis requires a lot of experimentation.
You won't know where the analysis is going to take you when you start.
Allow one question to lead to another, then another, and another.
Keep searching for new possible meanings.
What do theses two words mean?
What is something implied about the classroom that we can turn into an explicit observation?
Ask yourself "if so, then what?"
How do these analytical moves fit together?
The Analytical Triangle
Observations:
Effect:
Significance:
Move 1: Suspend Judgement
Move 2: Make implicit explicit
Move 3: Look for patterns
(Binaries, anomalies, stands)
Move 4: List possible effects of observations
(What might the patterns tell us about our source?)
Move 5: Keep reformulating questions and explanations
(What impact might this have on a larger scale?)
Observation:
Move 1: Suspend judgement
Move 2: Make implicit explicit
Move 3: Look for patterns
(Binaries, anomalies, stands)
Significance:
Move 5: Keep reformulating questions and explanations
(What impact might this have on a larger scale?)
Effect:
Move 4: List possible effects of observations
(What could our observations
tell us about our source?)
Can we practice this using our classroom observation?
Analysis as detective work
Take detailed notes on observations, even those that seem obvious.
List different theories on what the pattern might demonstrate or indicate about the source?
Chapter 2: Reading Analytically

"The challenge of reading well is to become
conversant
rather than reading for the gist...Reading for the gist causes readers to leap to global (and usually unsubstantiated) impressions, attending only superficially to what they are reading."

Strategies for Reading Analytically:

Pointing
Paraphrase X3
Passage Based Focused Freewriting
Uncovering assumptions
Tracking Binaries
Pointing
PARAPHRASE X3
Practice:
"We hold these truths to be self-evident. "
PASSAGE-BASED
FOCUSED FREEWRITE
UNCOVERING ASSUMPTIONS
UNCOVERING ASSUMPTIONS
Practice with this passage about "War Cripples" from the MoMA website.
TRACKING BINARIES
TRACKING BINARIES
Practice using the abstract from your reading.
CLAIMS VS. EVIDENCE
Using the first two paragraphs of this abstract, underline the claims and put a zigzag line under the evidence.
Also, highlight or put a box around what you think is the thesis statement.
Activity:
Thesis Writing and Passage-Based Freewrite
Step One:
Write down your initial thoughts on how you might answer the question for paper #1--
Does oil impede democracy?

Step Two:
Do a 10 min passage-based freewrite using the following source.

Ross, Michael. 2001. “Does Oil Hinder Democracy?” World Politics (April): 325-361.

Step Three:
Use your initial ideas, freewrite, and the thesis templates to come up with a (working) thesis statement.
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