Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

1890's: The Age fo Immigration and Urbanization

No description
by

Ahsas Sood

on 15 May 2014

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of 1890's: The Age fo Immigration and Urbanization

1890's: The Age of Immigration and Urbanization
Region of Birth of Foreign Born Population
Places of Stay in the US
Focusing on the Population Trend in America during the 1890's
Total Population: 62,622,250
There is a reason why the 1890's are called the "The Age of Immigration"
From 1891 to 1900 3,687,564 immigrants arrive in the US from all over the world. Their reasons range from political and religious freedom to escaping persecution or testing if America actually was the "Land of Opportunity".
Europe: 8,030,347
Asia: 113,383
Africa: 2,207
Oceania: 9,353
Latin America: 107,307
Total: 7,281,641
Most immigrants settled near the port of entry.
Seattle
New York
Many settled in large cities.
Chicago
Cleveland
Buffalo
Detroit
Milwaukee
Wallington
Only 2% settled in south.
White: 54,983,890 (87.8%)
Black: 7,470,040 (11.9%)
American Indian, Eskimo, and Aleut: 58,806 (0.1%)
Asian and Pacific Islander:109,514 (0.2%)
Population by Region
New England: 5,592,017
Middle Atlantic: 15,454,678
East North Central: 15,985,581
West North Central: 10,347,423
South Atlantic: 10,443,480
East South Central: 7,547,757
West South Central: 6,532,290
Mountain: 1,674,677
Pacific: 2,634,285
Total: 76,212,168
They settled near the ports because not everyone had the resources and the money to travel further into the nation. Also, they were eager to achieve what they came here for:
Brighter future
Job opportunity
A change from crop failure, rising tax, land shortage and famine.
More than 70% of the immigrants entered through New York and it came to be known as the "Golden Door"!
Fact Time!
Many immigrants face became victims of abuse because they were "different". Getting a job became very hard and once employed, they would be exploited. Men were payed less and women even less.
Population by Region
New England: 4,700,749
Middle Atlantic: 12,706,220
East North Central: 13,478,305
West North Central: 8,932,112
South Atlantic: 8,857,922
East South Central: 6,429,154
West South Central: 4,740,983
Mountain: 1,213,935
Pacific: 1,920,386
Total: 62,979,766
1900
1890
Throughout the decade the population of the Unites States increased by about 13 million , the West Coast by about 1 million , the Mid-West, the South and the East by about 4 million each.
Fact Time!
Fact Time!
Fact Time!
Fact Time!
The population of Washington in 1890 was 5 times that in 1855!
This was how census takers were instructed to count the 7,470,040 American citizens who were once slaves or descended from slaves.
"The word 'black' should be used to describe those persons who have three-fourths or more black blood; 'mulatto,' those persons who have from three-eighths to five-eighths black blood; 'quadroon,' those persons who have one-fourth black blood; and 'octoroon,' those persons who have one-eighth or any trace of black blood" (Measuring America).
For the first time the entry of an ethnic working group was proscribed through The Chinese Exclusion Act that was signed on May 6, 1882 because it seemed to "endanger the good order of certain localities. The act was renewed in 1892 and made permanent in 1992.".
Bibliography
"Historical Census Statistics on the Foreign-born Population of The United States: 1850-1990." Historical Census Statistics on the Foreign-Born Population of The United States: 1850 to 1990. N.p., n.d. Web. 28 Oct. 2013.
Reasons for Immigration." Reasons for Immigration. N.p., n.d. Web. 28 Oct. 2013.
"United States Resident Population by State: 1790 - 1990." United States Resident Population by State: 1790 - 1990. N.p., n.d. Web. 28 Oct. 2013.
"The Black Past: Remembered and Reclaimed | An Online Reference Guide to African American History by Professor Quintard Taylor, University of Washington." The Black Past: Remembered and Reclaimed | An Online Reference Guide to African American History by Professor Quintard Taylor, University of Washington. N.p., n.d. Web. 28 Oct. 2013.
"United States Immigration Before 1965." History.com. A&E Television Networks, n.d. Web. 28 Oct. 2013.
Full transcript