Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

The Awakening by Kate Chopin

Setting and Point of View
by

Jessica Burks

on 30 September 2014

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of The Awakening by Kate Chopin

"The pigeon-house pleased her. It at once assumed the intimate character of a home, while she herself invested it with a charm which it reflected like a warm glow." (pg. 156)
Grand Isle
New Orleans
The French Quarter
Late 19th century (1899)
Feminist Movement
Setting
3rd person omniscient: a method of storytelling in which the narrator knows the thoughts and feelings of all of the characters in the story
Quotes:
"Mr. Pontellier, unable to read his newspaper with any degree of comfort, arose with an expression and an exclamation of disgust." (pg. 5)

"The past was nothing to her; offered no lesson which she was willing to heed. The future was a mystery which she never attempted to penetrate. The present alone was significant; was hers, to torture her as it was doing then with the biting conviction that she had lost that which she had held, that she had been denied that which her impassioned, newly awakened being demanded." (pg. 75-76)
Quotes:
"The voice of the sea is seductive, never ceasing, whispering, clamoring, murmuring, inviting the soul to wander in abysses of solitude." (pg. 189)

“The city atmosphere certainly has improved her. Some way she doesn't seem like the same woman.” (pg. 102)

"He stopped before the door of his own cottage, which was the fourth one from the main building and next to the last. Seating himself in a wicker rocker which was there, he once more applied himself to the task of reading the newspaper. The day was Sunday; the paper was a day old. The Sunday papers had not yet reached the Grand Isle." (pg. 5)
Setting and Point of View
The Awakening
https://amsu-english11.wikispaces.com/file/view/new_orleans.gif/34552957/new_orleans.gif
http://media-cache-ec0.pinimg.com/236x/10/56/54/105654ebf4738f9fb1125f3efdc98967.jpg
http://www.laphamsquarterly.org/images/swimming.jpg
http://grandislesetting.weebly.com/uploads/1/4/5/3/14537234/2201297_orig.png
http://www.loyno.edu/~kchopin/new/women/images/fiction3.jpg
http://www.bcps.org/offices/Lis/models/awakening/images/french_quarter.jpg
http://insidefandb.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/New-Orleans-map.jpg
http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_LSaVf6BVBfw/Sr6Zi9TtCMI/AAAAAAAAABY/ZQ_q46NaqG4/s1600-h/kate+chopin-pigeon+house.jpg
http://s1.hubimg.com/u/1310790_f520.jpg
http://www.raspberry-cordial.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/The-Awakening-cover.jpg
http://fictionwriting.about.com/od/glossary/g/omniscient.htm
http://o.quizlet.com/pcxpXYtw6keySunBOCdZGQ_m.png
http://i.telegraph.co.uk/multimedia/archive/01806/earth_1806334c.jpg
http://www.sparknotes.com/lit/awakening/facts.html
Iberville
Point of View
"He could see plainly that she was not herself. That is, he could not see that she was becoming herself and daily casting aside that fictitious self which we assume like a garment with which to appear before the world." (pg. 96)
"'Has she,' asked the Doctor, with a smile, 'has she been associating of late with a circle of pseudointellectual women-superspiritual superior beings?" (pg. 109)
"As Edna walked along the street she was thinking of Robert. She was still under the spell of her infatuation. She had tried to forget him, realizing the inutility of remembering. But the thought of him was like an obsession, ever pressing itself upon her." (pg. 90)
"The Pontelliers possessed a very charming home on Esplanade Street in New Orleans. It was a large, double cottage, with a broad front veranda, whose round, fluted columns supported the sloping roof. The house was painted a dazzling white; the outside shutters, or jalousies, were green. In the yard, which was kept scrupulously neat, were flowers and plants of every description which flourishes in South Louisiana." (pg. 83)
"The softest carpets and rugs covered the floors; rich and tasteful draperies hung at doors and windows. There were paintings, selected with judgment and discrimination, upon the walls. " (pg. 83)
Full transcript