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Avoiding Run-on Sentences & Comma Splices -plus- Moving Beyond the Simple Sentence

This prezi explores ch. 17 & 18 from _Along These Lines_ for ENG 090 10 & 22, Fall 2012
by

Stacey Dearing

on 12 September 2012

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Transcript of Avoiding Run-on Sentences & Comma Splices -plus- Moving Beyond the Simple Sentence

Avoiding run-on sentences & comma splices
as well as more ways to combine sentences! Chapters 17 & 18 Independent clauses that have not been joined correctly Run-on Sentences 1. Check for 2 Independent Clauses
2. Check that the clauses are separated by either
a coordinating conjunction & a comma
a semicolon
OR
by using a period to separate the 2 clauses and capitalizing the first letter of the second clause 2 Steps to correct run-ons Samples Coordinating conjunction & a comma:
The meeting was a waste of time, for the club members argued about silly issues. Semicolon:
The meeting was a waste of time; the club members argued about silly issues. Period & a capital letter:
The meeting was a waste of time. The club members argued about silly issues. Let's hear about this another way are errors that occur when you punctuate with a comma but should use a semicolon instead

if you are joining 2 independent clauses without a coordinating conjunction (FANBOYS) you MUST use a semicolon (;), a comma is not enough Comma Splices 1. Check for 2 independent clauses
2. Check that the clauses are separated by a coordinating conjunction.
If so, use a comma
If not, change the comma to a semicolon Correcting Comma Splices Let's practice! pg 408 ex 4: Edit the following paragraph for run-on sentences and comma splices. There are 9 errors. Late arrivals are turning my life into a nightmare. Yesterday my car wouldn't start this happened to me in a mall parking lot. I had to call an automobile repair service to check my car, and the service operator promised service within an hour. One hour extended into two, meanwhile, I stood beside my car with its hood raised. It was hot on the pavement, in addition, I felt idiotic and pitiful in the eyes of the other shoppers. A service person finally arrived and towed my car yet the wait was frustrating. A similar incident occurred last week but it involved waiting in my home. My refrigerator began to make a strange grinding sound soon it simply shut off. I called a repair company and agreed to pay extra for emergency service. It was slow emergency service, in fact, it arrived three hours later. By that time, water had dripped all over the kitchen floor. The refrigerator technician offered a brief apology then he took a quick look at my refrigerator and gave me the bad news. I wound up with a huge bill for refrigerator parts and a huge headache. I sometimes keep other people waiting and have never thought about their frustrations. Now I have had my own double dose of irritation I will try harder not to keep others waiting. Review:
an independent clause is a simple sentence; it is a group of words, with a subject and a verb, that makes sense by itself

a dependent clause cannot stand alone, but can be used to combine simple sentences Beyond the Simple Sentence:
Subordination so far we have covered 3 ways to combine sentences:
1. by using a comma followed by a coordinating conjunction (FANBOYS)
2.using a semicolon
3.using a semicolon and a conjunctive adverb Ways to combine sentences 4. using a dependent clause (begins with a subordinating conjunction) to begin a sentence

5. using a dependent clause to end a sentence 2 New Ways to combine sentences 1. by using a comma followed by a coordinating conjunction (FANBOYS)
2.using a semicolon
3.using a semicolon and a conjunctive adverb
4. using a dependent clause (begins with a subordinating conjunction) to begin a sentence
5. using a dependent clause to end a sentence 5 Ways to combine sentences I love combining sentences! Subordinating By adding a subordinating conjunction to a simple sentence, you can turn it into a dependent clause

You can then either begin or end a sentence with that dependent clause See pg 413 for subordinating conjunctions examples Mother and Dad wrapped my presents while I slept.

When Caroline studies, she gets good grades.

When the students take notes, they do better in class.

If you study, you will do well in school.

I got sick because I played outside in the rain.

Whenever I forget to do my homework, I feel stressed. Punctuating Complex sentences a sentence that has 1 independent clause and 1 (or more) dependent clause is called a complex sentence. Punctuating these complex sentences is easy!

If the dependent clause comes at the beginning of the sentence, put a comma AFTER the dependent clause

If the dependent clause comes at the end of the sentence, do NOT put a comma in front of the dependent clause Final draft of your cause or effect paragraph is due!
Remember: the paragraph must be typed, with proper MLA format, and is due at the beginning of class

Read chapter 26, complete ex 3
Read chapter 27, complete ex 3 For next time! Peer Review Please turn to page 214 in your book.
Exchange drafts with a partner and, on a separate sheet of paper, answer all of the questions on the peer review form. Turn in with your final draft: 1. Free write (done in class)
2. Detail list (hw)
3. Outline (hw)
4. Rough draft
5. Peer Review sheet
6. Final draft! Oh no! Homework, hide me!
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