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The Famous Five

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Mitchell Herbst

on 19 November 2013

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Transcript of The Famous Five

The Famous Five
The Famous Five
Social Change Cont.
After the Persons Case women were now able to pursue jobs that were once only available to men. Before the Persons Case Emily Murphy worked as a police magistrate and her rulings were often challenged as she was not a legal 'person'.
Emily Murphy and Louise McKinney helped to start the Dower Act which allowed women to share property rights in marriage, because at the time all possessions in a marriage were considered to be the mans. Thanks to these women, women today can share equally in their marriages.
The Famous Five started a chain reaction of events that saw women eventually become equal to men in all aspects of life
Women's Rights
On October 18, 1929 the Persons Case came to a close when the British Judicial Committee of the Privy Council overturned the law that women were not 'persons'. From now on all women would have the right to be equal in Canada, and to be considered persons by the law
The Famous Five
The Famous Five was a group of five women who fought to have women legally considered persons. This group consisted of Emily Murphy, Nellie McClung, Irene Parlby, Louise McKinney, and Henrietta Muir Edwards
March 14, 1868 in
Cookstown, Ontario
Emily Murphy
Nellie McClung
October 20, 1873 in Chatsworth, Ontario
January 9, 1868 in London, United Kingdom
Irene Parlby
September 22, 1868 in Frankville, Ontario
Louise McKinney
December 18, 1849 in Montreal, Quebec
Henrietta Muir
Social Change
On August 27, 1927, the Famous Five created a petition asking, "Does the word 'persons' in the British North America Act of 1867 include female persons"? to the Supreme Court of Canada. The ultimate goal of the petition was to have women legally considered 'persons' so that they could run for senate. This event, known as 'The Persons Case' allowed Canadian women the opportunity to run for senate and more importantly gave them the same political rights as Canadian men. In addition, this petition established what is call the 'living tree doctrine'. The living tree doctrine is a set of rules stating that the constitution is not set in stone, and therefore must adapt with the changing times. Thanks to the 'Persons Case", the first Canadian senator, Carine Wilson, was elected in 1930. Today over one third of Canadian Senators are women
Fun Fact
The Famous Five were also known as the Valiant Five
The Famous Five used campaigning as their main strategy for social change. The women spent many years in the court system petitioning for their rights
Speeches and peaceful marches were also held over this time, allowing the public to hear about women's rights
The Famous Five also used advertising to their advantage, showing mock short films of men and women's roles reversed, mocking the idea that women were not 'persons'.
Emily Murphy grew up in a home full of politicians, leading to her interest in becoming one as an adult. She worked for women's rights her entire life and became the first woman magistrate in the British Empire in 1916, often being ridiculed by men. Emily was considered to be the leader of the Famous Five.
Nellie McClung was a Canadian feminist, politician, and social activist. She was a part of the social and moral reform movements prevalent in Western Canada in the early 1900s.
Irene Parlby came to Canada in 1896. Parlby was a Canadian women's farm leader, activist and politician.
Louise McKinney was a provincial politician and women's rights activist from Alberta, Canada. McKinney was a strong believer in temperance education, stronger liquor control, women's property rights
Henrietta Muir Edwards was a Canadian women's rights activist and reformer. Henrietta was involved with the creation of many women's rights organizations
None of the Five women became senators, but on October 8, 2009 the Canadian Senate voted to have the Famous Five named as honorary Senators for their work in the Person's Case.
Honorary Senators
Full transcript