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The British System of Government

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Christopher Beckvold

on 17 September 2015

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Transcript of The British System of Government

Constitutional Monarchy
The British System
of Government

Separation of power

Executive
Legislative
Judiciary
British
Parliament
Government
UK Courts of Law
House of
Commons
House of
Lords
Ministers and
Prime Minister
Electors
House of Commons
Members:
650
Members:
:
800
legislative
Represents:
The people
House of Lords
The unwritten
constitution
Represents:
Which
institutions
represent the
power
What
about
the
Executive


power
Cabinet Ministers
20
the opposition
How
the election process
works
The UK is divided into constituencies.
Each constituency elects a member of the House of Commons.
votes
Who
18 years old
British
Judiciary
Power
The UK courts of law
Represents: The rule of
The
Government
Represents :
The interests of the majority party
law
devolution


power
Why do we talk about
of
agriculture
health
housing
environment
education
Monarch
Today, this role is largely ceremonial.
The Speaker

A form of republican government with the monarch, limited by a constitution, at the seat of power.

There is a separation of powers.
British Monarchy & Parliament


After King John
Monarchs tried to nullify the Magna Carta with mixed success.
The collection of nobles and churchmen who advised the monarch became known as the "Parliament."
During the 1300s, Parliament divided into the "House of Lords" and the "House of Commons."
Charles I
Charles exacerbated the problem further by dismissing Parliament, imprisoning members and opponents without trial, and violating other historic English rights.
His actions led to the English Civil War in 1642.
The war resulted in Parliament's victory in 1651. King Charles I was beheaded and England became a republic.
James I
King James I believed in "Divine Right" and that he should not have to deal with Parliament.
James I clashed with Parliament throughout his reign.
James II
James was a Catholic who tried to rule as an absolute monarch like his father Charles I.
When James II's son was born, Parliament intervened, overthrowing James and inviting his daughter Mary and her husband William (both Protestants) to rule England.
Glorious Revolution (1688)
English Bill of Rights
Parliament presented the English Bill of Rights to William and Mary in 1689 as a condition for taking the throne. Outlining the rights of Parliament, it proved that the king was no longer supreme. Instead, Parliament was in charge.
Among these rights were
1. "Power of the Purse" given to Parliament
2. Freedom of Petition
3. No Standing Armies
4. Right to bear arms
5. Freedom of Speech
6. No Cruel Punishments or excessive fines
7. Parliament shall meet frequently
The British Government Today
The Queen can:
Give or withold "Royal Assent" to a bill.
Has Access to all Government intelligence
Has the right to be consulted by the Prime Minister (PM)
Queen Elizabeth II
The PM:
Is the head of "Her Majesty's Government," but is chosen by the British people.
Is the leader of the majority party in the House of Commons
Controls the flow of all legislation in Parliament.
The Leader of the Opposition:
Leads the opposition (minority) party in the House of Commons
Opposes all legislation proposed by the PM

Anti-Monarchists
The British monarchy is a costly institution, spending money on the Royal Palaces and traveling. The monarch does not serve a real purpose in the Government.
Monarchists
The Queen's status and place in British society is highly regarded. Queen Elizabeth II is a great attraction in Great Britain as well. A lot of people visit the Royal Palaces, hoping to get a look of the Queen. The monarch is also a symbol of stability and unity in the United Kingdom.
Also known as the House of Peers.
These positions are inherited. A person is a peer if they or their ancestors were given a position by the monarch (Duke, Earl, Viscount, etc.)

The Old Bailey
is the highest court
in the country.
King George I

Born: 28 May 1660 in Osnabruck, Hanover

Parents: Ernst August & Sophia Stuart

Crowned: 20 October 1714

Reigned for: 12 years, 10 months, 9 days

Married: Sophia Dorothea of Celle

Died: 11 June 1727 in Osnabruck
George I became king because the previous monarch of Great Britain, Queen Anne, did not have any children. He did not know much English and spent much of his time in Germany. During his reign, he created the role of Prime Minister. Sir Robert Walpole was the first.
Full transcript