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Blackbird by The Beatles- Analysis

Adelynn Woodard Hoxie Hour 6 2-26-15
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Adelynn Woodard

on 10 March 2015

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Transcript of Blackbird by The Beatles- Analysis

Blackbird by The Beatles
Blackbird singing in the dead of night
Take these sunken eyes and learn to see
All your life
You were only waiting for this moment to be free.
In this stanza, the obstacle faced are the blackbird's "sunken eyes," acting as a form of imagery and symbolism. Blackbirds don't literally have "sunken" eyes, but imagery gives the blackbird a sense of exhaustion. "Sunken eyes" can also act as symbolism that refers to old age, suggesting that the blackbird is old, trying to "learn to see" again. Once the blackbird finally "sees", it will realizes that its life is oppressed.
Blackbird fly Blackbird fly
Into the light of the dark black night.

Blackbird fly Blackbird fly
Into the light of the dark black night.
The blackbird is again encouraged to leave and fly into the night. This can suggest that the blackbird has been oppressed for a long time, and that it does not have enough self-confidence to leave on its own. Having to be coaxed into its flying away, the blackbird does not know about the liberation of of freedom.
Blackbird by The Beatles
Blackbird
is a short song written by the Beatles in 1968, with the overcoming of oppression and search for freedom as the theme and depression as the tone. At first, the title
Blackbird
can remind the reader of the European Blackbird, similar to our American Robin. However, upon further analysis, we can understand that the Blackbird in the song is actually symbolism, representing the struggles of oppression and those who are oppressed. In the beginning of each stanza, an obstacle is faced, and the blackbird must overcome and prevail to become free.
Blackbird singing in the dead of night
Take these broken wings and learn to fly
All your life
You were only waiting for this moment to arise.
In this stanza, the blackbird has waited all its life for the chance to take its "broken wings" and find its freedom. Broken wings acts as obstacles which keep the bird from flight.

Antithesis is used by placing two unlike things together, such as broken wings and the idea of flight. This is also juxtapose, and creates a paradox between the two, adding realism to the struggles of oppression in song.
Adelynn Woodard
Hoxie Hr. 6
February 28, 2015

The lines "blackbird singing in the dead of night" are used again (repetition) and emphasize that the blackbird must only do these things at night. Repetition adds to the idea of oppression and the desire, with the search for freedom as the blackbird's actions are unwanted, but the bird still continues to attempt them.
Blackbird singing in the dead of night
Take these broken wing and learn to fly
All your life
You were only waiting for this moment to arise
You were only waiting for this moment to arise
You were only waiting for this moment to arise
Juxtapose is used by placing light and dark night together, adding to the importance of secrecy and of the drive to escape.
All its life, the bird has waited for this moment when it can finally use its broken wing, and fly away for good. The blackbird arises despite the long though journey.
Despite the obstacles, the blackbird is destined to prevail. In their short song, the Beatles used many literary devices including juxtapose, antithesis, imagery, repetition, and symbolism to convey the overall theme and tone of freedom and escape from oppression.
Because the last three lines of this song are repeated, it can suggest that the Blackbird was not the only one to be oppressed, but also its family, with past generations and future generation, adding to the urgency of the Blackbird's escape.
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