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A Journey to Debunk the Myths and Expose the Truth Behind Smoking Tobacco

Detroit Hispanic Development Corporation
by

Shelby Chaney

on 26 August 2013

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Transcript of A Journey to Debunk the Myths and Expose the Truth Behind Smoking Tobacco

I COULD NEVER BE ADDICTED RIGHT?
2011 SMOKING STATISTICS IN THE U.S.
You CAN Quit Now!
.
You may not know...
"There are approximately
600 ingredients
in cigarettes. When burned, they create more than
4,000 chemicals.
At least 50 of these chemicals are known to cause cancer, and
many are poisonous.
 
Many of these chemicals are also found in consumer products, but these products have warning labels. While the public is warned about the danger of the poisons in these products, there is no such warning for the toxins in tobacco smoke. "
EXACTLY WHAT AM I SMOKING?
ACETONE
– found in nail polish remover
ACETIC ACID
–  an ingredient in hair dye
AMMONIA
– a common household cleaner
ARSENIC
– used in rat poison
BENZENE
– found in rubber cement
BUTANE
– used in lighter fluid
CADMIUM
– active component in battery acid
CARBON MONOXIDE
– released in car exhaust fumes
FORMALDEHYDE
– embalming fluid
HEXAMINE
– found in barbecue lighter fluid
LEAD
– used in batteries
NAPTHALENE
– an ingredient in moth balls
METHANOL
– a main component in rocket fuel
NICOTINE
– used as insecticide
TAR
– material for paving roads
TOLUENE
- used to manufacture paint

A JOURNEY TO EXPOSE THE TRUTHS AND DEBUNK THE MYTHS BEHIND SMOKING TOBACCO
How your body responds to nicotine...
Nicotine acts on the brain and is absorbed by the lungs.
Nicotine acts as a stimulant and as a sedative; it produces a pleasurable sensation and it "increases alertness, relaxes muscles, improves memory and attention, and decreases irritability."
"The stimulant effect causes a
sudden increase in blood pressure, breathing rate, and heart rate.
The central nervous system stimulation is followed by depression and fatigue,
causing the person to want another cigarette."
I CAN ONLY GET LUNG CANCER RIGHT?
Smoking does not just cause lung cancer. It has also been linked to:

Cancer of the Mouth
Larynx Cancer (Vocal Chords)
Pharynx Cancer (Throat)
Esophageal Caner (Throat)
Pancreatic Cancer
Kidney Cancer
Bladder Cancer
Cervical Cancer
Smoker's Lungs vs. Healthy Lungs
Health Risks
Tobacco use is the leading preventable cause of death in the U.S.
It causes more then 44,000 deaths each year.
It is associated with more than $75 billion in direct medical costs.
Health Risks
Nationally, smoking results in more than
5.6 million years of potential life lost
each year.
More than 6.4 million children living today
will die prematurely
because of the DECISION to smoke cigarettes.
Approximately 80% of adult smokers started smoking before the age of 18. Every day, nearly 4,000 young people under the age of 18 try their first cigarette.

SMOKING ONLY AFFECTS ME
An estimated
3,000
lung cancer deaths occur annually among adult nonsmokers in the United States because of
secondhand
smoke exposure.
Approximately
60%
of people in the United States have biological evidence of
secondhand smoke
exposure.


CANCER IS NOT
THE ONLY RISK
Smoking tobacco also increases deaths related to:
Heart Disease
Stoke & Arterial Disease
Pneumonia
Influenza
Bronchitis
Smoking also increases:
Infertility
Difficulty managing diabetes
Bad Cholesterol
Blood Pressure
19.0% of all adults: 21.6% of males, 16.5% of females (43.8 million people)
31.5% non-Hispanic American Indian/Alaska Native
27.4% non-Hispanic multiple race
20.6% non-Hispanic white
19.4% non-Hispanic black
12.9% Hispanic/Latino
9.9% non-Hispanic Asian


MICHIGAN STATISTICS
Tobacco among Latinos/Hispanics
In 2012, over 8,000 new cases of lung cancer were estimated to occur among Hispanics/Latinos; and
more than 5,000 Hispanics/Latinos were estimated to die from this disease.
Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death among Hispanic men and the
second leading cause among Hispanic women.
Cancer and heart disease are the first and
second leading causes of death
, among Hispanic Americans; and tobacco use is an important factor.

PREGNANT & SMOKING
The dangers of smoking while pregnant:

There is a
lower amount of oxygen
available for you and your growing baby.
Smoking increases your baby's heart rate.
Smoking
increases the chances of miscarriage
and stillbirth.
Smoking increases the risk that your baby will be born prematurely and/or born with low birth weight.
Smoking increases your baby's risk of developing respiratory (lung) problems.

WHAT'S HAPPENING
WITH THE YOUTH?
Each day in the United States, approximately
3,900
young people between 12 and 17 years of age smoke their first cigarette, and an estimated
1,000 youth become daily cigarette smokers.
"More than 3.6 million kids under the age of 18 are current smokers" -Surgeon General, 2012
About 1/5 of children are current smokers by the time they leave high school. -University of Michigan 2012
"18.1% of all high school students are current smokers." CDC 2011

I'm not at risk because I'm younger.
Let's think again..
.
“The resting heart rates of young adult smokers are two to three beats per minute faster than nonsmokers.”

“Smoking at an early age increases the risk of lung cancer.


“Teenage smokers suffer from shortness of breath almost three times as often as teens who don't smoke.”

I'm not at risk because I'm younger.
“Teens who smoke are 3 times more likely than nonsmokers to use alcohol, 8 times more likely to use marijuana, and 22 times more likely to use cocaine. Smoking is associated with a host of other risky behaviors, such as fighting and engaging in unprotected sex.”

Detroit Hispanic Development Corporation
Health Department
Fernanda Sanchez and Ana Rivera
1211 Trumbull
Detroit, MI, 48216
(313) 967 - 4880

According to the 2012 Michigan Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, an estimated 23.3% of Michigan residents are current smokers.
20% of Michigan residents that identify as Hispanic/Latino are current smokers.

Smoking & Female?
Smoking & Pregnant?
• "Smoking makes it harder for a woman to get pregnant."

• "Smoking can cause problems with the placenta —the source of the baby's food and oxygen during pregnancy. For example, the placenta can separate from the womb too early, causing bleeding, which is dangerous to the mother and baby."


Shelby Chaney
University of Michigan
Summer 2013
Full transcript