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Library Research 101

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Amy Mars

on 1 September 2014

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Transcript of Library Research 101

Library Research 101
Amy Mars, Librarian
Office 116, anmars@stkate.edu

Why use the library when there is Google?
This bubble's content:
Veen, B.V. (2013, February 14). Prezi. Retrieved from: http://prezi.com/uoayaj8la2gk/library-research-101/
What is a database?
A searchable collection of organized information
Library database
Internet Search Engine
vs
information is organized to facilitate search & retrieval
content is purchased w/students needs in mind
Lots of quality, scholarly information
information is unorganized, search results are less precise
lots of free content (of varying quality)
All kinds of information mixed together (harder to find the scholarly stuff)
More control over your search
What does this button do?
Clicking
Look for full-text in other databases, then bring you there if we have it
Check to see if we have a print copy of the article
Tell you "no holdings are available"...if you have a little time you can request it via Inter-library Loan
will
Searching Databases
What!? I can get books from other area college libraries?
Tips for searching:
1). Identify the most important concepts in your research assignment
2). Choose keywords to describe those concepts
3). Consider synonyms & related terms
4). Choose 1-3 keywords and combine them with AND, OR, NOT
Experiencing information overload?
(too many results)
Ways to pinpoint your search results:
add/subtract keywords
try different keywords
try subject headings
use database limiters
Let's try it!
Let's say you're researching this topic:
What are the main concepts?
Related terms?
How would you combine them together?


Explore Academic Search Premier:
Find articles on your topic & answer the following questions:
1. What were your most successful search terms?
2. What were the most useful subject headings you came across?
3. How did you refine your search? (to under 200 results)
4. How do you create citations in this database?
5. How do you limit to scholarly peer-reviewed articles?

Evaluating Information
How do we know if information is good?
Does it pass the CRAAP test?
urrency
elevance
uthority
ccuracy
urpose
C
R
A
A
P
Is the source
current?
When was it published?
Has the information been revised or updated?
Does your topic require current information or will older information work as well?
Is the source
relevant?
Does this information relate to your topic or answer a research question?
Who is the intended audience?
Have you looked at a variety of sources before determining that this is the one you will use?
Is the source
authoritative?
Who is the author and/or publisher?
What are the author's credentials or organization affiliations?
Does the url (.com, .org, .edu, .gov) reveal anything about the source?
Is the source
accurate?
Is the information supported by evidence/citations?
Is the information peer-reviewed?
Can you verify the information provided?
What is the
purpose
of this source?
To inform?
To persuade?
To entertain?
To sell?
Is it fact or opinion?
Are multiple perspectives presented?
Are there political, ideological, cultural, religious, institutional or personal biases?
Anatomy of a scholarly article: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/tutorials/scholarly-articles/
Authors
Scholars, academics, researchers - not paid to write articles
Audience
Scholars, researchers, teachers, students
Purpose
To inform/advance knowledge in a specific discipline (like Psychology, History, Physics)
Content
Original research, in-depth analysis, theory
Accountability
Peer review ** (edited for content, style, evidence) by peer experts in a particular subject area
Language
Can be highly technical & contain jargon (specialized terminology)


Authors
Journalists/staff writers, paid to write article, may not have subject expertise
Audience
General public, the interested non-specialists
Purpose
Depending on the magazine and article itself: to inform, persuade, sell or entertain
Content
News reporting, editorials, discussion of someone else’s research personal stories, current events, popular culture
Accountability
Edited by editorial staff or single editor (not often subject experts) for style & content
Language
Geared toward general public, easy for most readers to understand

Citing your Sources
Why is it important to cite?
Check our citation guide:
http://libguides.stkate.edu/citationguides
To give other's credit for their work
Your work is more credible
People can look up your sources
To avoid plagiarism
Stuck?
Visit us at the reference desk
M-Thur 11am-8pm
Friday 11-5pm
Weekends noon-4pm
call: 651-690-6652
email: reference@stkate.edu
make an appointment: http://library.stkate.edu/Forms/meetlibrarian.html
Check out our research guides:
What kind of databases does the library have?
To find
articles
, use one of our many databases. Some have articles on all subjects, others are more specialized:
Business Source Premier
CINAHL (Nursing)
ERIC (Education)
Literature Resource Center
PsychINFO

To find
books
, use the library catalog
Remember!
There are always exceptions to these general guidelines:
http://www.improbable.com/airchives/classical/cat/cat.html
Your Mission
Your Mission


Explore the Library Catalog:
Find 1 book on your topic & answer the following questions:
1. What were your most successful search terms?
2. What were the most useful subject headings you came across?
3. How do you request books from other schools?
4. How do you create citations in this database?


Your Mission


Explore a subject-specific database on your topic:
Find articles on your topic & answer the following questions:
1. What was the same about this database? Different?
2. were your most successful search terms?
3. How did you refine your search? (to under 200 results)
4. How do you create citations in this database?
5. How do you limit to scholarly peer-reviewed articles?
Full transcript