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Fairtrade

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by

Sarah Macca

on 1 September 2015

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Transcript of Fairtrade

Product A's Country: Mexico
Product B's Country: Brazil
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By Sarah McDonnell and Nicole Schweizer
Development Inequality
The goals of fair trade are:
To help give farmers who can't get good prices for their products have better access to markets so that they can get better prices and more money to develop their land.

To provide opportunities for those at a disadvantage in the line of production to have better development, especially woman and indigenous people.

To have a strong partnership in trade doing this by showing respect and through dialogue.

To alert us (the buyers) of people who aren't getting paid fairly so that we only buy fair trade products so there will be higher demand for these products so that there will have to be more fair trade products.

To campaign against the rules of trading internationally and to protect the human rights of the people getting unfairly paid or put int terrible, harmful and deadly conditions.
The Goals of Fair Trade
A= Sugar B= Citrus Fruit

A renewable resource is a resource that can never be depleted or used up.

A non-renewable resource is a resource that can be depleted/used up.

Sugar is a renewable resource because we can simple grow more of it as it is needed.

Citrus fruit is also a renewable resource because it can also simply be re-grown as needed.
Renewable and Non-renewable
Development is the measure of living standards in a country, this is measured by economic, social and political development.

Inequality is the condition of being unequal.

Development inequality is the rich-poor gap between different countries and their developement.

Fair trade is an organization which helps poorer farmers and workers to get better pay and working conditions.
Mexico is a developing country, this is because of poor sanitation, dry land, and 'inconsistency'. Mexico city is the most populated city in Mexico, with more than 8 million people in the area, yet it has some of the poorest sanitation. About 17% of the land in Mexico is farmed but 45% of the land is dry and impossible to farm. Mexico in some parts is as good as the western world, but in others is just as bad as Africa, this is another aspect that is stopping it from developing.

Brazil is also a developing country, this is because of high death rates, low life expectancy, high birth rates and high infant mortality. Brazil have 6.5 deaths per 1000 people due to unreliable water suppliers, poor housing conditions, poor access to medical services, and diets short in calories and protein. The birth rate of Brazil is 15.2 per 1000 people while infant mortality is 20.5 per 1000 people, this shows that many children are born each year in Brazil but there is not enough resources and help to keep them living. The life expectancy of Brazil is 74 years, 6 years lower than the average life expectancy.
Developed or Developing?
Countries for Case Study
Citrus Fruit Production
Sugar Production
10 useful facts
1. GDP per Capita:
$17,900 US
2. GDP growth rate:
4% in 2014
Mexico
Fair Trade make sure sugar producers have these:
- Producers are organized in groups which they govern democratically.
- Agrochemicals cannot be used on farms and sustainability is encouraged.
- If they want, the groups can be given up to 60% of the purchase price.
- A Fairtrade Premium is paid directly to the groups and is used for things like education, health services, processing equipment, and loans.
Fairtrade make sure Citrus Fruit producers have these:
- A group that has workers and a management team responsible for the use of money and money must not be used to pay for operating costs, but to improve living and working conditions
- Child labour of children of 15 years and under is not allowed. Work for children over 15 can't interfere with their education and they must not do work that could risk their health.
- Salaries must be at or above the minimum wage.
- Health and safety measures must be followed so there are no work-related injuries.
The impact Fair Trade has had
Brazil
Sarah's family:
I looked all through the pantry at home and could not find any Fairtrade products. We use a lot of hot chocolate though, so we could start getting fairtrade hot chocolate

Nicole's family:
My family does not currently consume or buy fair trade products. However, we could buy fair trade banana's because we often buy banana's for school lunches. We could also use fair trade ice blocks because we buy quite a lot in the summer.

We did discovered that in New Zealand you can buy Fairtrade Coffee, Tea, Hot chocolate, Chocolate, Bananas, Cotton clothing & bags, Drinks, Ice Blocks & vanilla.
Our families and Fair Trade
Conclusion
Top 5 Sugar Producers
Top 5 Citrus Fruit Producers
Product A's country
Product B's country
3. Exports: $406.4 billion in 2014
4. Imports: $407.1 billion in 2014
5. Life expectancy: 72.67 years for male, 78.32 years for female
6. Birth Rate: 19.02 births/1,000 population in 2014
7. Death Rate: 5.24/1,000 population in 2014
8. Literacy: 96.2% for male, 94.2% for female in 2014
9. School Life expectancy: 13 years for male and female in 2012
10. Physicians: 2.1/1,000 people
Sugar Cane
Sugar Beet
10 useful facts
1. GDP per Capita:
$15,200 US in 2014
2. GDP growth rate:
0.3% in 2014
3. Exports:
$242.7 billion in 2014
4. Imports: $241.9 billion in 2014
5. Life expectancy: 69.73 years for male, 77 years for female in 2014
6. Birth Rate: 14.72/1,000 population in 2014
7. Death Rate: 6.54/1,000 population in 2014
8. Literacy: 92.2% for male, 92.9% for female in 2015
9. School Life expectancy: 14 years male, 15 years female in 2005
10. Physicians: 1.89/1,000 people
The citrus fruit production process begins with the planting of citrus seeds. Once the citrus fruit trees have fully matured, they begin to produce beautiful flowers. These flowers will then become the citrus fruits, sadly about more then 99% of these flowers fall off before becoming fruits. However, there are still enough flowers left to produce plenty of citrus fruits. For nutrients, citrus fruit trees need lots of nitrogen, phosphorous, potassium, sulfur and calcium and in smaller amounts they need iron, magnesium, copper, zinc, manganese, molybdenum, boron and chlorine. Commercial growers prune the tops of the trees as this makes it easier to pick the fruits it also is cost effective as well. They also hedge the sides so sunlight can get in. The citrus fruit are then painstakingly hand picked into large bins holding roughly 900 pounds. These bins are then sent to a packinghouse, here the fruit is sorted (bad fruits are thrown) and cleaned. The natural wax on this fruit is removed when it is cleaned so it is therefore replaced by a non-animal source wax. They put on this wax so as to stop the loss of moisture and so the fruits have a long shelf life. Most of these fruits then get packed by robotic carton packing machines and then put onto crates and put into pre-coolers. Finally, the fruits are sent to shops and supermarkets to be bought by us.
Thanks for listening!
Citrus fruits packed in cartons
A small citrus fruit tree
beginning to flower
United States
Brazil
Mexico
India
China
United States
Brazil
India
Pakistan
China
The farmers plant the sugar beet and sugar cane. The sugar beet plant's grow in cooler places in the world whereas the sugar cane predominantly grows in tropical or sub-tropical countries in the world. Once the plants have grown, they are harvested, sugar canes are harvested by chopping the stems but leaving the roots so they can grow the next crop. Sugar beet's are harvested by being dug out of the ground. Afterwards, both the sugar cane and sugar beets are loaded onto trucks or carts and are then brought to the factories. At the factories, they are washed as to get rid of the dirt and then the sugar beet are sliced into thin slices, by doing this it makes it easier to extract the juice. The sugar beets then go into a diffuser which the slices go from end to the other and the water goes in the opposite direction which therefore extracts the juice from the sugar beet. The sugar cane has its juice extracted by being crushed in big roller machine this make all the juice come out. Then the juice is made into the syrup by using steam to boil off the water in the juice. Sugar beets have there water in the juice evaporated in a similar way. The sugar beet and sugar cane juice is then placed into a large pan holding about 60 tons which are then boiled which therefore takes away more of the water. Crystal are grown during the boiling and these crystal's are stored ready to be sold into shops and supermarkets.

The farmers plant the sugar beet and sugar cane. The sugar beet plant's grow in cooler places in the world whereas the sugar cane predominantly grows in tropical or sub-tropical countries in the world.
Once the plants have grown, they are harvested, sugar canes are harvested by chopping the stems but leaving the roots so they can grow the next crop. Sugar beet's are harvested by being dug out of the ground. Afterwards, both the sugar cane and sugar beets are loaded onto trucks or carts and are then brought to the factories.
Harvesting sugar beet
Harvesting sugar cane
Sugar cane being brought to the factory
Sugar beet being brought to the factory
At the factories, they are washed as to get rid of the dirt and then the sugar beet are sliced into thin slices, by doing this it makes it easier to extract the juice. The sugar beets then go into a diffuser which the slices go from end to the other and the water goes in the opposite direction which therefore extracts the juice from the sugar beet. The sugar cane has its juice extracted by being crushed in big roller machine this make all the juice come out.
Sugar beet diffuser
Sugar cane roller machine
Then the juice is made into the syrup by using steam to boil off the water in the juice. Sugar beets have there water in the juice evaporated in a similar way. The sugar beet and sugar cane juice is then placed into a large pan holding about 60 tons which are then boiled which therefore takes away more of the water. Crystal are grown during the boiling and these crystal's are stored ready to be sold into shops and supermarkets.
Juice being boiled
The end product
The sugar crystals
Citrus fruit seeds ready to be planted
The citrus fruit production process begins with the planting of citrus seeds. Once the citrus fruit trees have fully matured, they begin to produce beautiful flowers. These flowers will then become the citrus fruits, sadly about more then 99% of these flowers fall off before becoming fruits. However, there are still enough flowers left to produce plenty of citrus fruits.
Citrus fruit tree beginning to flower and produce fruit
Commercial growers prune the tops of the trees as this makes it easier to pick the fruits it also is cost effective as well. They also hedge the sides so sunlight can get in.
Citrus fruit trees pruned and hedged
The citrus fruit are then painstakingly hand picked into large bins holding roughly 900 pounds. These bins are then sent to a packinghouse, here the fruit is sorted (bad fruits are thrown) and cleaned. The natural wax on this fruit is removed when it is cleaned so it is therefore replaced by a non-animal source wax. They put on this wax so as to stop the loss of moisture and so the fruits have a long shelf life.
Citrus fruit being picked
They put on this wax so as to stop the loss of moisture and so the fruits have a long shelf life. Most of these fruits then get packed by robotic carton packing machines and then put onto crates and put into pre-coolers. Finally, the fruits are sent to shops and supermarkets to be bought by us.
A small citrus fruit tree
beginning to flower
Full transcript