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Aesop

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Lillian McCree

on 8 May 2017

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Transcript of Aesop

Several theories about his origin or place of birth
- Thrace, Phrygia, Lydia, Samos, Athens and Ethiopia

Was a slave
- Xenthus in Samos
- Jadon (gave him freedom)

Conducted a public defense of a demagogue on the Greek island of Samos

Lived at the Court of Croesus, the King of Lydia
- met Solon and the Seven Sages of Greece

Visited Athens during the reign of Peisistratus

Died in Delphi
- thrown from a cliff
Aesop's Bio
Herodotus
(5th Century BC)
first to write about Aesop himself
Demetrius Phalareus

(4th century BC)
produced the first known written collection of fables ascribed to Aesop, Aesop's Fables
Valerius Babrius

(2nd century BC)
translated fables into Greek
Phaedrus

(1st century CE)
translated fables into Latin known as the Romulus collection
Ignatius Diaconus

(9th century CE)
translated fables into Sanskrit (Indian)
Maximus Planudes

(14th century CE)
a monk, produced an English collection
Fables
Aesop
Vocabulary Words
Fable

(noun)
- short-stories, typically with animals as characters, conveying a moral
Moral

(noun)
- a lesson, especially one concerning what is right or prudent, that can be derived from a story, a piece of information, or an experience
Demagogue

(noun)
- a political leader who seeks support by appealing to popular desires rather than by using rational argument
Origin
(noun)
- the point or place where something begins, arises or is derived
Aethiopian
, or Ethiopian
(noun)
- an ancient Greek word used to describe any dark-skinned people from Africa (Ethiopia)
620 BC - 560 BC
(if he really existed)

A slave who won his freedom by telling fables

Believed to be the most read, translated, adapted, embellished and illustrated Greek author

Accredited for over 600 fables

But Aesop most likely collected his fables from others
Egyptian papyri over 800 yrs before Aesop
Prophet Mohamed wrote some 5 century before Aesop
Places of Possible Origin
Thrace
Phrygia
Sardes, Lydia
Samos
Athens, Greece
Ethiopia, Africa
Places Lived and Traveled
Samos (slave)
Lydia (with King Croesus)
Athens
Delphi (died)
Solon (638 BC - 558 BC)

a famous Athenian law maker and a poet who became a one of the Seven Sages of Greece
Seven Sages of Greece
(aka Seven Wise Men)
620BC - 550BC

The title given by ancient Greek tradition to seven early-6th-century BC philosophers, statesmen, and lawgivers who were renowned in the following centuries for their wisdom


Most Translated, Adapted, Embellished, Illustrated
Greek Author
2000
800
Aesop's Fables
The Ants and Grasshopper
(It is best to prepare for the days of necessity)
The Crow and the Pitcher

(Little by little does the trick, or Necessity is the mother of invention)
The Fox and the Grapes

(It is easy to despise what you cannot get, or since I can have them they must not be good)
The Hare and the Tortoise

(Slow and steady wins the race)
The Lion and the Eagle

(try before you trust)
The Man and the Flea
(even the smallest evil deed should be punished)

Changes Over Time
As fables were translated, the stories and morals changed and altered
Example:
The Cock and the Pearl (moral: precious things for those that can prize them)
recognizing vanity
blindness to value
1. Victorian Age
Many of the fables were coarse and brutal, and often involved killing. So the Victorians suppressed shocking fables and purposely changed others for more moral tone and less harshness.
Example:
The Eagle and the Fox (moral: do unto others as you would have them do unto you)
Before:
The mothers kill each others babies
After:
The mothers return in time to save their own babies
2. Audience changed
Aesop told fables to Adults always
today fables have been made into children's books
parents use them to teach children morals and good lesson

The Crow and the Pitch
Pitcher
(noun)

- a container used to hold and pour liquids
Neck

(noun)
- refers to a thin part of an object

Worksheet

https://www.commonlit.org/texts/the-crow-and-the-pitcher
The Ants and the Grasshopper
Humbly
(adverb)
- not proudly; lowly
Disgust
(noun)
- a strong feeling of dislike
Worksheet
https://www.commonlit.org/texts/the-ants-and-the-grasshopper
The Boy Who Cried Wolf
worksheet
https://www.commonlit.org/texts/the-boy-who-cried-wolf
The Lion and the Mouse

(No act of kindness, no matter how small, is ever wasted)
The Dogs and the Fox

(It is easy to kick a man when he is down)
The City Mouse and the Country Mouse

(Better beans and bacon in peace than cakes and ale in fear)
The Wolf in Sheep's Clothing

(Appearances can be deceptive)
The Miser
(if you hide what you have, and don't use it, them you don't really have it anyway)
The Boy Who Cried Wolf
(A liar will not be believed, even when he speaks the truth)
https://jeopardylabs.com/play/aesops-fables4
Let's Play Jeopardy!!
Fables
Aesop
Moral
600
300
0
800
1300
CCSS.ELA.LIT.RL.2
Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text
CCSS.ELA.LIT.RL.2
Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text
CCSS.ELA.LIT.RL.2
Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text
CCSS.ELA.LIT.RL.1
Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

CCSS.ELA.LIT.RL.3
Analyze how complex characters develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.
The Lion and the Mouse
Worksheet
https://www.commonlit.org/texts/the-lion-and-the-mouse
CCSS.ELA.LIT.RL.2
Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text
Full transcript