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Why?

Students have the opportunity to use scientific inquiry & develop the ability to think scientifically. This includes asking questions, investigating, gathering data, thinking critically, and communicating scientific information.
by

Jackie McCarthy

on 25 June 2012

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Transcript of Why?

Why? Are there things in nature that make you wonder why? Take time to take a good look at Nature around the school, outside your home, or anywhere outdoors. Find four things in nature that make you ask "Why?" Take pictures of these things and write a "Why?" question for each picture. Research the answer to your question on the Internet or in the library. Write a short answer of about two to four sentences that answers each of your "Why?" questions. Prepare a presentation with your picture and question. In two weeks, the entire class will play the "Why?" quiz. All photos taken by every student will be presented in class. One student at a time will ask the other students if they can answer his or her "Why?" questions. When it's your turn to show your photos, ask the question you prepared for each photo. When another student guesses the answer, you can only say "yes" if the answer is correct or "no" if the answer is wrong. After a few minutes, if nobody in the class can guess the answer, you will provide the answer. So be prepared to answer by doing good research.
• Think about the "Why?" question before you take a photograph. How to take photographs: http://www.actionbioscience.org/newfrontiers/hazen.html Examples "Why do clouds move across the sky?" Why do earthquakes happen? Why does a cat have whiskers? Why are glaciers blue? Remember You can't use these examples and you must have original photos (no googling for the pic). You may borrow my classroom camera or use your phone. You must present the photo and question in class, but can use the presentation software of your choice. • Take photographs of things in nature, not things made by people • If you can't take a photograph of the exact thing for your question, take one of something that is related to or is a good symbol for the thing.

For example, if you can't take a photo of the rising sun for "Why does the sun rise in the East?" take one of a weathervane. • You can edit your photos in any way to make the answer to your question evident. • Please include something personal in the photo so I know you took it. Question about reading?
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