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Impact of the Jim Crow Laws on To Kill a Mockingbird

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Michelle Wang

on 23 May 2013

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Transcript of Impact of the Jim Crow Laws on To Kill a Mockingbird

The Impact of the
Jim Crow Laws on To Kill a Mockingbird With the lead of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and other individuals, the fight against the laws succeeded. Lawsuits after lawsuits were brought to the courts to combat the morality of the Jim Crow Laws. Several laws and court decisions were made to completely end the Jim Crow Laws. The Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Voting Rights Act of 1965, and the Twenty-Fourth Amendment, among many other initiatives, were passed to destroy the remnants of the laws, or racial segregation.
With the Fair Housing Act of 1968, the legal sanctions to Jim Crow were finally ended and any remnants of Jim Crow were destroyed. If an African American disobeyed or broke any of the laws, he was very likely to be lynched. A few etiquette standards placed on African Americans... Never assert or even intimate that a white person is lying.
Never impute dishonorable intentions to a white person.
Never suggest that a white person is from an inferior class.
Never lay claim to, or overly demonstrate, superior knowledge or intelligence.
Never curse a white person.
Never laugh derisively at a white person.
Never comment upon the appearance of a white female.


Whites'
Rights African
Americans'
Rights In the 1800s to mid 1900s, African Americans were still treated as unequal human beings. The Jim Crow Laws obstructed the path to equality for all as they enforced restrictive behavior etiquette upon the African Americans and supported the racist mindset. The U. S. Supreme Court inadvertently allowed for the creation of The Jim Crow Laws in 1883 when the court ruled that it couldn't enforce the 14th Amendment at the individual level. What is the 14th Amendment?
Fast Fact:The 14th Amendment defines a U.S. citizen. This amendment states that all states will provide equal protection to everyone within their jurisdiction, provide due process under the law, and equally provide all constitutional rights to all citizens of the United States of America, regardless of race, sex, religious beliefs and creed. Not long after African Americans were freed as slaves, the ominous journey ahead of them presented itself as bumpy, rough, perilous, and formidable terrain.

How much longer could they tolerate the inequality?
How much longer would they have to wait before a change could finally be seen and justice be achieved for all? Scout Finch, the protagonist, faces trials as a result of the mindset caused by the Jim Crow Laws. To Kill a Mockingbird is set in a period in which the Jim Crow Laws dominated the society. Depending on one's ethnicity, one had to use different restaurants, bathrooms, schools, etc. The Southerners justified all this by saying that legal segregation is constitutional if everything is "separate but equal". However, instead of promoting the "separate but equal" ideal, the Jim Crow Laws really promoted the "separate and unequal" treatment of African Americans. Many African Americans didn't get a fair trial in court either. Although the constitution says everyone is entitled to one, in To Kill a Mockingbird, one can see how Tom Robinson was mistreated in court and how the jury favored Bob Ewell's word though his story was contradictory to that of his own daughter. What is that?
...
What is he doing? You don't know?
He's Jim Crow!
Here, I'll teach you all about it!
It all started back in the 1860s... Though the Jim Crow Laws called for “separate but equal” treatment of African Americans, African Americans were given inadequate basic care, supplies, and facilities. This corrupt nature of the Jim Crow Laws inspired Harper Lee to write To Kill a Mockingbird as way to criticize racial segregation. "Jim Crow" came from a minstrel show song "Jump Jim Crow", written by Thomas Rice, and later represented a way of life as well as the practice of racial segregation. Eventually affecting almost every Southerner's life, Jim Crow began as a character that represented and mocked African Americans. The laws profoundly affected people’s mindsets. Since whites were “chosen”, African Americans were discriminated and derided by white folks, like the whites who denied Tom Robinson of the presumption of innocence in To Kill a Mockingbird. These laws played a key role in the daily lesser treatment of African Americans. In To Kill a Mockingbird, as a result of the laws, African Americans used facilities separate from white residents. The mindset caused by these laws also caused no one besides Atticus Finch to be willing to be the lawyer of Tom, an African American. The truth of whether or not Tom raped the girl didn't matter; it was a white man's word against an African American's word. Racial Segregation: A Way of Life The turning point in the combat against the laws came with the decision in the case Brown v. Board of Education, in which public school segregation was struck down. Jim Crow Laws Fast Fact: The NAACP was founded on February 12, 1909. Fast Fact: What Does "Lynched" Mean? To lynch someone means to...
(of a mob) kill (someone), esp. by hanging, for an alleged offense with or without a legal trial By Michelle Wang, Sam Carlson, and Allen Marterella African Americans' Rights Whites' Rights EQUALITY FOR ALL Because of the brave leaders, bold followers, and humble spirits that fought to end the Jim Crow laws, all remnants of the Jim Crow Laws were destroyed, and the United States of America finally achieved the greatest blessing for its posterity: equality for all. Out of the maze and chaos of inequality; into the abyss and freedom of equality. The Impact of the
Jim Crow Laws on To Kill a Mockingbird With the lead of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and other individuals, the fight against the laws succeeded. Lawsuits after lawsuits were brought to the courts to combat the morality of the Jim Crow Laws. Several laws and court decisions were made to completely end the Jim Crow Laws. The Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Voting Rights Act of 1965, and the Twenty-Fourth Amendment, among many other initiatives, were passed to destroy the remnants of the laws, or racial segregation.
With the Fair Housing Act of 1968, the legal sanctions to Jim Crow were finally ended and any remnants of Jim Crow were destroyed. If an African American disobeyed or broke any of the laws, he was very likely to be lynched. Etiquette Never assert or even intimate that a White person is lying.
Never impute dishonorable intentions to a White person.
Never suggest that a White person is from an inferior class.
Never lay claim to, or overly demonstrate, superior knowledge or intelligence.
Never curse a White person.
Never laugh derisively at a White person.
Never comment upon the appearance of a White female.
A Black male could not offer his hand (to shake hands) with a White male because it implied being socially equal. Obviously, a Black male could not offer his hand or any other part of his body to a White woman, because he risked being accused of rape.Blacks and Whites were not supposed to eat together. If they did eat together, Whites were to be served first, and some sort of partition was to be placed between them.Under no circumstance was a Black male to offer to light the cigarette of a White female — that gesture implied intimacy.Blacks were not allowed to show public affection toward one another in public, especially kissing, because it offended Whites.Jim Crow etiquette prescribed that Blacks were introduced to Whites, never Whites to Blacks. Whites'
Rights African
Americans'
Rights In the 1800s to mid 1900s, African Americans were still treated as unequal human beings. The Jim Crow Laws obstructed the path to equality for all as they enforced restrictive behavior etiquette upon the African Americans and supported the racist mindset. The U. S. Supreme Court inadvertently allowed for the creation of The Jim Crow Laws in 1883 when the court ruled that it couldn't enforce the 14th Amendment at the individual level. What is the 14th Amendment?
Fast Fact:The 14th Amendment defines a U.S. citizen. This amendment states that all states will provide equal protection to everyone within their jurisdiction, provide due process under the law, and equally provide all constitutional rights to all citizens of the United States of America, regardless of race, sex, religious beliefs and creed. Not long after African Americans were freed as slaves, the ominous journey ahead of them presented itself as bumpy, rough, perilous, and formidable terrain.

How much longer could they tolerate the inequality?
How much longer would they have to wait before a change could finally be seen and justice be achieved for all? Scout Finch, the protagonist, faces trials as a result of the mindset caused by the Jim Crow Laws. To Kill a Mockingbird is set in a period in which the Jim Crow Laws dominated the society. Depending on one's ethnicity, one had to use different restaurants, bathrooms, schools, etc. The Southerners justified all this by saying that legal segregation is constitutional if everything is "separate but equal". However, instead of promoting the "separate but equal" ideal, the Jim Crow Laws really promoted the "separate and unequal" treatment of African Americans. Many African Americans didn't get a fair trial in court either. Although the constitution says everyone is entitled to one, in To Kill a Mockingbird one can see how Tom Robinson is mistreated in court and how the jury favored Bob Ewell's word though his story was contradictory to that of his own daughter. Though the Jim Crow Laws called for “separate but equal” treatment of African Americans, African Americans were given inadequate basic care, supplies, and facilities. This corrupt nature of the Jim Crow Laws inspired Harper Lee to write To Kill a Mockingbird as way to criticize racial segregation. "Jim Crow" came from a minstrel show song "Jump Jim Crow", written by Thomas Rice, and later represented a way of life as well as the practice of racial segregation. Eventually affecting almost every Southerner's life, Jim Crow began as a character that represented and mocked African Americans. The laws profoundly affected people’s mindsets. Since whites were “chosen”, African Americans were discriminated and derided by white folks, like the whites who denied Tom Robinson of the presumption of innocence in To Kill a Mockingbird. These laws played a key role in the daily lesser treatment of African Americans. In To Kill a Mockingbird, as a result of the laws, African Americans used facilities separate from white residents. The mindset caused by these laws also caused none besides Atticus Finch to be willing to be the lawyer of Tom, an African American. The truth of whether or not Tom raped the girl didn't matter; it was a white man's word against an African American's word. Racial Segregation: A Way of Life The turning point in the combat against the laws came with the decision in the case Brown v. Board of Education, in which public school segregation was struck down. Jim Crow Laws Fast Fact: The NAACP was founded on February 12, 1909. Fast Fact: What Does "Lynched" Mean? To lynch someone means to...
(of a mob) kill (someone), esp. by hanging, for an alleged offense with or without a legal trial By Michelle Wang, Sam Carlson, and Allen Marterella African Americans' Rights Whites' Rights EQUALITY FOR ALL Because of the brave leaders, bold followers, and humble leaders that fought to end the Jim Crow laws, all remnants of the Jim Crow Laws were destroyed, and the United States of America finally achieved the greatest blessing for its posterity: equality for all. The Jim Crow Laws, or racial segregation, brought several restrictive etiquette standards that greatly limited African Americans' freedom and behavioral expectations. A black male could not offer his hand (to shake hands) with a white male because it implied being socially equal.

A black male could not offer his hand or any other part of his body to a white woman, because he risked being accused of rape. Blacks and whites were not supposed to eat together. If they did eat together, whites were to be served first, and some sort of partition was to be placed between them.

Under no circumstance was a black male to offer to light the cigarette of a white female — that gesture implied intimacy.

Blacks were not allowed to show public affection toward one another in public, especially kissing, because it offended whites.

Blacks were introduced to whites, never whites to blacks. "Propaganda" Enforcing the Destruction of the Jim Crow Laws An example of the "separate and unequal treatment" of African Americans.
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