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TOM HULL

A study of Hull's origami works and my own copy of his five interesting tetrahedra.
by

Athena Liu

on 9 November 2012

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Transcript of TOM HULL

FINE110042.01
Case Study: by 11300290034 刘小禾
力学与工程科学系 Now I'll make my own FIT! Analyse The Model The relation between any two tetrahedron is the same! FIT
&
Dodecahedron What is the optimal strut width? Finished! ^_^ One Tetrahedron Link Them Together! Materials Tom Hull
(b1969 , American) Five Interesting
Tetrahedra
(='FIT') PROJECT
ORIGAMI Who's Tom Hull?
What has he done?
Tom Hull is an associate professor of mathematics at Western New England University in Massachusetts. TOM HULL
&
HIS 'FIT' Hull's own research has developed some of the mathematical foundations of origami, and his historical analysis has uncovered previously neglected mathematical origami contributions by other scholars. A preeminent authority on the mathematics of paper folding. His passion for teaching often combines origami and mathematics, and he regularly teaches origami math to classes ranging from high school to advanced college seminars. His origami works, which are mostly modular forms, display the intersection of mathematics and art. His book, Project Origami , explains how origami can be used to teach math—not just geometry, but also calculus, abstract algebra, topology, and more. BUCKY BALLS PHiZZ BALL Thank you! Question Time
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