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E4: Renaissance Poetry

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john meehan

on 10 January 2013

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Transcript of E4: Renaissance Poetry

sonnet quatrain couplet words to know: turn iambic pentameter rhyme scheme enjambment
When, in disgrace with Fortune and men’s eyes,
I all alone beweep my outcast state,
And trouble deaf heaven with my bootless cries,
And look upon myself and curse my fate,
5 Wishing me like to one more rich in hope,
Featured like him, like him with friends possessed,
Desiring this man’s art, and that man’s scope,
With what I most enjoy contented least;
Yet in these thoughts myself almost despising,
10 Haply I think on thee, and then my state,
Like to the lark at break of day arising
From sullen earth, sings hymns at heaven’s gate;
For thy sweet love remembered such wealth brings
That then I scorn to change my state with kings. Sonnet 29
That time of year thou mayst in me behold
When yellow leaves, or none, or few, do hang
Upon those boughs which shake against the cold,
Bare ruined choirs where late the sweet birds sang.
5 In me thou see’st the twilight of such day
As after sunset fadeth in the west,
Which by and by black night doth take away,
Death’s second self, that seals up all in rest.
In me thou see’st the glowing of such fire,
10 That on the ashes of his youth doth lie
As the deathbed whereon it must expire,
Consumed with that which it was nourished by.
This thou perceivest, which makes thy love more strong,
To love that well which thou must leave ere long. Sonnet 73 154 sonnets in all first 126 addressed to a "young man"
last 28 addressed to a "dark lady" William Shakespeare
Let me not to the marriage of true minds
Admit impediments. Love is not love
Which alters when it alteration finds,
Or bends with the remover to remove.
5 Oh no! It is an ever-fixèd mark
That looks on tempests and is never shaken.
It is the star to every wandering bark,
Whose worth’s unknown, although his height be taken.
Love’s not Time’s fool, though rosy lips and cheeks
10 Within his bending sickle’s compass come.
Love alters not with his brief hours and weeks,
But bears it out even to the edge of doom.
If this be error and upon me proved,
I never writ, nor no man ever loved. Sonnet 116 My mistress’ eyes are nothing like the sun,
Coral is far more red than her lips’ red.
If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun,
If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head.
5 I have seen roses damasked, red and white,
But no such roses see I in her cheeks.
And in some perfumes is there more delight
Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks,
I love to hear her speak, yet well I know
10 That music hath a far more pleasing sound.
I grant I never saw a goddess go,
My mistress, when she walks, treads on the ground.
And yet, by Heaven, I think my love as rare
As any she belied with false compare. Sonnet 130 Poetry (1485-1660) "The Shakespearean Sonnet" Christopher Marlowe Sir Walter Raleigh Robert Herrick Andrew Marvell John Donne Ben Jonson 1984
Frankenstein
Beowulf
Grendel
Sir Gawain and the Green Knight Possible Essays and Short Answer Topics: Social Class Structure / Satire
Metaphysical Poets
Aristotelian Tragic Heroes

Men's roles in literature
Women's roles in literature
Heroes vs. Monsters

Major Themes of Beowulf / Grendel
Major Themes of Macbeth
Major Themes of Reniassance Poetry If I could slip inside your amber smell
And fall into the dreams of how we’d dance
I’d memorize how all your fingers fell
Each tip along the waistline of my pants.
When we were young and pink and holding palms
Flesh pressed and pulsing in Stone Harbor sun
I think of how I’d hold you in the calm
Before the stormfront met the tidal run.
You in my arms against the Jersey gray
The smile on your lips and in your eyes
And when September put your heart away
You showed me what it meant to feel goodbye.
And though the years apart have made me tough,
I wonder what I’ll say if you pick up. Sonnet for Sarah sonnet essentials: Traditionally about LOVE
EXACTLY 14 lines long
EXACTLY 10 syllables per line
Rhyme Scheme = ABAB, CDCD, EFEF, GG
Often contain a "turn" (line 9) or "twist" (lines 13-14) Contemporary Sonnets Mark but this flea, and mark in this,
How little that which thou deniest me is ;
It suck'd me first, and now sucks thee,
And in this flea our two bloods mingled be.
Thou know'st that this cannot be said 5
A sin, nor shame, nor loss of maidenhead ;
Yet this enjoys before it woo,
And pamper'd swells with one blood made of two ;
And this, alas ! is more than we would do. O stay, three lives in one flea spare, 10
Where we almost, yea, more than married are.
This flea is you and I, and this
Our marriage bed, and marriage temple is.
Though parents grudge, and you, we're met,
And cloister'd in these living walls of jet. 15
Though use make you apt to kill me,
Let not to that self-murder added be,
And sacrilege, three sins in killing three. Cruel and sudden, hast thou since
Purpled thy nail in blood of innocence? 20
Wherein could this flea guilty be,
Except in that drop which it suck'd from thee?
Yet thou triumph'st, and say'st that thou
Find'st not thyself nor me the weaker now.
'Tis true ; then learn how false fears be ;
Just so much honour, when thou yield'st to me, 25
Will waste, as this flea's death took life from thee. The Flea By John Donne Had we but world enough, and time,
This coyness, lady, were no crime.
We would sit down and think which way
To walk, and pass our long love's day;
Thou by the Indian Ganges' side
Shouldst rubies find; I by the tide
Of Humber would complain. I would
Love you ten years before the Flood;
And you should, if you please, refuse
Till the conversion of the Jews.
My vegetable love should grow
Vaster than empires, and more slow.
An hundred years should go to praise
Thine eyes, and on thy forehead gaze;
Two hundred to adore each breast,
But thirty thousand to the rest;
An age at least to every part,
And the last age should show your heart.
For, lady, you deserve this state,
Nor would I love at lower rate.
But at my back I always hear
Time's winged chariot hurrying near;
And yonder all before us lie
Deserts of vast eternity.
Thy beauty shall no more be found,
Nor, in thy marble vault, shall sound
My echoing song; then worms shall try
That long preserv'd virginity,
And your quaint honour turn to dust,
And into ashes all my lust.
The grave's a fine and private place,
But none I think do there embrace. Now therefore, while the youthful hue
Sits on thy skin like morning dew,
And while thy willing soul transpires
At every pore with instant fires,
Now let us sport us while we may;
And now, like am'rous birds of prey,
Rather at once our time devour,
Than languish in his slow-chapp'd power.
Let us roll all our strength, and all
Our sweetness, up into one ball;
And tear our pleasures with rough strife
Thorough the iron gates of life.
Thus, though we cannot make our sun
Stand still, yet we will make him run. To His Coy Mistress Andrew Marvell Batter my heart, three-person'd God ; for you
As yet but knock ; breathe, shine, and seek to mend ;
That I may rise, and stand, o'erthrow me, and bend
Your force, to break, blow, burn, and make me new.
I, like an usurp'd town, to another due,
Labour to admit you, but O, to no end.
Reason, your viceroy in me, me should defend,
But is captived, and proves weak or untrue.
Yet dearly I love you, and would be loved fain,
But am betroth'd unto your enemy ;
Divorce me, untie, or break that knot again,
Take me to you, imprison me, for I,
Except you enthrall me, never shall be free,
Nor ever chaste, except you ravish me. Come live with me, and be my love,
And we will all the pleasures prove
That valleys, groves, hills, and fields,
Woods, or steepy mountain yields.

5 And we will sit upon the rocks,
Seeing the shepherds feed their flocks
By shallow rivers, to whose falls
Melodious birds sing madrigals.

And I will make thee beds of roses,
10 And a thousand fragrant posies,
A cap of flowers, and a kirtle,
Embroidered all with leaves of myrtle. A gown made of the finest wool
Which from our pretty lambs we pull,
15 Fair linèd slippers for the cold,
With buckles of the purest gold.

A belt of straw and ivy buds,
With coral clasps and amber studs,
And if these pleasures may thee move,
20 Come live with me, and be my love.

The shepherd swains shall dance and sing
For thy delight each May morning.
If these delights thy mind may move,
Then live with me, and be my love. The Passionate Shepherd to His Love lyric poems 1564-1593 Lyric poetry is a poem used to express feelings. Lyric poems have specific rhyming schemes and are often, but not always, set to music or a beat. 1552-1618 If all the world and love were young,
And truth in every shepherd’s tongue,
These pretty pleasures might me move
To live with thee and be thy love.

5 But Time drives flocks from field to fold,
When rivers rage and rocks grow cold,
And Philomel becometh dumb;
The rest complains of cares to come.

The flowers do fade, and wanton fields
10 To wayward winter reckoning yields;
A honey tongue, a heart of gall
Is fancy’s spring, but sorrow’s fall. Thy gowns, thy shoes, thy beds of roses,
Thy cap, thy kirtle, and thy posies.
15 Soon break, soon wither, soon forgotten,
In folly ripe, in reason rotten.

Thy belt of straw and ivy buds,
Thy coral clasps and amber studs,
All these in me no means can move
20 To come to thee and be thy love.

But could youth last and love still breed,
Had joys no date, nor age no need,
Then these delights my mind might move
To live with thee and be thy love. The Nymph’s Reply to the Shepherd pastoral poetry glorifies the uncorrupted beauty of nature and the countryside Gather ye rosebuds while ye may,
Old Time is still a-flying;
And this same flower that smiles today,
Tomorrow will be dying.

5 The glorious lamp of heaven, the sun,
The higher he’s a-getting,
The sooner will his race be run,
And nearer he’s to setting. That age is best which is the first,
10 When youth and blood are warmer;
But being spent, the worse, and worst
Times still succeed the former.

Then be not coy, but use your time;
And while ye may, go marry:
15 For having lost but once your prime,
You may forever tarry. To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time metaphysical poetry Please explain the speaker, source, and significance of any one of these quotes. Midterm Details: Week of Jan. 14- Jan. 17 Page 1:
Quote ID

6 quotes listed


explain speaker, source and significance of THREE

(10 minutes) Page 2:
Short Answer

3 questions listed


Provide a short response (5 sentences) to TWO

(15 minutes) Page 3:
Essay

3 questions listed


Provide a detailed response (5 paragraphs) to TWO

(50 minutes) 3 2 2 Each person must answer seven questions

75 minutes of testing. Two exams per day.

All tests are CLOSED NOTES and NO BOOK

No vocab items. All free response. Monday, Jan. 14, 2013
Exam Session 1 (3th period classes) - 8:30 - 9:45 a.m.
Exam Session 2 (4th period classes) - 10:15 - 11:30 a.m.


Tuesday, Jan. 15, 2013
Exam Session 1 (8th period classes) - 8:30 - 9:45 a.m.
Exam Session 2 (5th period classes) - 10:15 - 11:30 a.m.


Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2013
Exam Session 1 (1st period classes) - 8:30 - 9:45 a.m.
Exam Session 2 (6th period classes) - 10:15 - 11:30 a.m.


Thursday, Jan. 17, 2013
Exam Session 1 (2nd period classes) - 8:30 - 9:45 a.m.
Exam Session 2 (7th period classes) - 10:15 - 11:30 a.m. Texts studied to date: "War is peace.
Freedom is slavery.
Ignorance is strength.” "When April with his showers sweet with fruit
The drought of March has pierced unto the root
And bathed each vein with liquor that has power
To generate therein and sire the flower;" Warm-up: you will need a blank piece of paper for today's POSSIBLE
SHORT ANSWER and
ESSAY TOPICS + Rennaisance Poetry (including the Metaphysical Poets) EXAM SCHEDULE EXAM DETAILS Warm-up: you will need a blank piece of paper for today's (write in complete sentences) (write in complete sentences) SAMPLE QUESTIONS: What does it mean to be a "monster?" Using evidence from stories discussed in class, trace the evolution of literary "monsters" and discuss what individual character traits make them this way. The Canterbury Tales (Prologue)
The Pardoner's Tale
The Wife of Bath's Tale
Macbeth
Song of the Holly
Auld Lang Syne “If I cannot inspire love, I will cause fear!” 1984
Frankenstein
Beowulf
Grendel
Sir Gawain and
the Green Knight Texts studied to date: The Canterbury Tales (Prologue)
The Pardoner's Tale
The Wife of Bath's Tale
Macbeth
Song of the Holly
Auld Lang Syne Provide specific "monstrous" examples from AT LEAST THREE OF THE WORKS WE READ IN CLASS. MIDTERM EXAM
ESSAY QUESTIONS Is Macbeth a “Aristotelian Tragic Hero?” Consider the definition of the Aristotelian Tragic Hero that we discussed in class, and weigh your findings against text evidence from Macbeth. Cite specific examples from the play to support your answer. Discuss the role of women in at least three of the major texts that we’ve studied this year. Use
specific evidence from each of the texts to compare/contrast female characters, and address the
changing role of women in the societies of their time. Discuss the theme of masculinity in Macbeth. Choose three characters and their perceptions of manhood to address in your discussion. Make sure to address the difference between genuine manliness and mere ego-driven machismo. Cite specific examples from the play to support your answer. SHORT ANSWER QUOTE ID: a group of poets of the 17th century who wrote poems that focused on "conceit" "cleverness"
and
"wit" "analytical arguments" (elaborate metaphor) often about topics such as love or religion Come live with me, and be my love,
And we will all the pleasures prove
That valleys, groves, hills, and fields,
Woods, or steepy mountain yields.

5 And we will sit upon the rocks,
Seeing the shepherds feed their flocks
By shallow rivers, to whose falls
Melodious birds sing madrigals.

And I will make thee beds of roses,
10 And a thousand fragrant posies,
A cap of flowers, and a kirtle,
Embroidered all with leaves of myrtle. A gown made of the finest wool
Which from our pretty lambs we pull,
15 Fair linèd slippers for the cold,
With buckles of the purest gold.

A belt of straw and ivy buds,
With coral clasps and amber studs,
And if these pleasures may thee move,
20 Come live with me, and be my love.

The shepherd swains shall dance and sing
For thy delight each May morning.
If these delights thy mind may move,
Then live with me, and be my love. The Passionate Shepherd to His Love If all the world and love were young,
And truth in every shepherd’s tongue,
These pretty pleasures might me move
To live with thee and be thy love.

5 But Time drives flocks from field to fold,
When rivers rage and rocks grow cold,
And Philomel becometh dumb;
The rest complains of cares to come.

The flowers do fade, and wanton fields
10 To wayward winter reckoning yields;
A honey tongue, a heart of gall
Is fancy’s spring, but sorrow’s fall. Thy gowns, thy shoes, thy beds of roses,
Thy cap, thy kirtle, and thy posies.
15 Soon break, soon wither, soon forgotten,
In folly ripe, in reason rotten.

Thy belt of straw and ivy buds,
Thy coral clasps and amber studs,
All these in me no means can move
20 To come to thee and be thy love.

But could youth last and love still breed,
Had joys no date, nor age no need,
Then these delights my mind might move
To live with thee and be thy love. The Nymph’s Reply to the Shepherd Sir Walter Raleigh Christopher Marlowe Queen Elizabeth I (Queen of England from 1558-1603) Death be not proud, though some have callèd thee
Mighty and dreadful, for thou art not so,
For those whom thou think’st thou dost overthrow,
Die not, poor Death, nor yet canst thou kill me.
5 From rest and sleep, which but thy pictures be,
Much pleasure, then from thee, much more must flow,
And soonest our best men with thee do go,
Rest of their bones, and soul’s delivery.
Thou art slave to fate, chance, kings, and desperate men,
10 And dost with poison, war, and sickness dwell,
And poppy, or charms can make us sleep as well,
And better than thy stroke; why swell’st thou then?
One short sleep past, we wake eternally,
And death shall be no more; Death, thou shalt die. Guard your hearts, boys! For thy mate
Seeks entrapment by delight
Trapdoor spider lies in wait
Fear and tremble at her sight

Arm thyself with silver sheaths
Measure well the holy cost
Certain doom lies there beneath
In her web where men are lost

With your silken gift is spun
In her vessel death's cocoon
By this union comes undone
Men who boldly came too soon

Gird your loins, men! Gird them well
Lest you learn love's cruelest pain
Loss of heaven for such hell
Foresight lost for foreskin's gain. The Trapdoor Spider 1. conceit?

2. cleverness?

3. argument? Edmund Spenser My love is like to ice, and I to fire;
How comes it then that this her cold so great
Is not dissolved through my so hot desire,
But harder grows the more I her entreat?
5 Or how comes it that my exceeding heat
Is not delayed by her heart frozen cold,
But that I burn much more in boiling sweat,
And feel my flames augmented manifold?
What more miraculous thing may be told
10 That fire which all thing melts, should harden ice,
And ice which is congealed with senseless cold,
Should kindle fire by wonderful device?
Such is the power of love in gentle mind,
That it can alter all the course of kind. One day I wrote her name upon the strand,
But came the waves and washèd it away;
Again I wrote it with a second hand,
But came the tide, and made my pains his prey.
5 “Vain man,” said she, “that doest in vain assay,
A mortal thing so to immortalize,
For I myself shall like to this decay,
And eke my name be wipèd out likewise.”
“Not so,” quod I, “let baser things devise
10 To die in dust, but you shall live by fame:
My verse your virtues rare shall eternize,
And in the heavens write your glorious name.
Where when as death shall all the world subdue,
Our love shall live, and later life renew.” Sonnet 30 Sonnet 75 Farewell, thou child of my right hand, and joy;
My sin was too much hope of thee, loved boy:
Seven years thou wert lent to me, and I thee pay,
Exacted by thy fate, on the just day.
5 Oh, could I lose all father now! for why
Will man lament the state he should envy—
To have so soon ’scaped world’s and flesh’s rage,
And if no other misery, yet age?
Rest in soft peace, and asked, say, “Here doth lie
10 Ben Jonson his best piece of poetry;
For whose sake henceforth all his vows be such
As what he loves may never like too much.” On My First Son To Cecelia Drink to me only with thine eyes,
And I will pledge with mine;
Or leave a kiss but in the cup,
And I’ll not look for wine.
5 The thirst that from the soul doth rise
Doth ask a drink divine;
But might I of Jove’s nectar sup,
I would not change for thine.
I sent thee late a rosy wreath,
10 Not so much honoring thee
As giving it a hope, that there
It could not withered be.
But thou thereon didst only breathe,
And sent’st it back to me;
15 Since when it grows, and smells, I swear,
Not of itself but thee. There is a 100% chance that there will be a question on your midterm that deals with metaphysical poetry and its differences/similarities to other poems of the Renaissance.
"May those who curse days curse that day,
those who are ready to rouse Leviathan."
- Job 3:8

Vulgar abscess, whole of sin
Lust, the dread Leviathan.
Sweetened lips that never kissed
Lurk below miasmal mist

Squirming coils lie beneath
Twisting round the holy sheath
Nestled deep, a moment's pause
Tempting death from rotten jaws.

Slumbered thrusts now rise above
Beckon all-consuming love
Breaching waves and all within
Pray, enfold me to your skin.

Violent crimson cry of pain
Pressed against each throbbing vein
Blackened torch meets broken wall
Crash in union, die and fall.
Leviathan

Lingered scent of lost perfume
Now unearthed from your tomb
Haunts each new and passing breath
From what wreckage lay in death.

Grant salvation from this hell
Self divided soul and shell.
Yours long after love is gone
Piercing flesh as gyres run on.
PLEASE BRING: White (lined) paper, pen(cil)
DO NOT BRING: Notes, devices, books
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