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Native Americans

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by

Dani Nisim

on 8 May 2015

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Transcript of Native Americans

Thesis
The postcards “Heap Big Talk,” “Pale Faced Take-Um Chance,” “White Man Tepee Handy,” and “White Man Ask Foolish Question” demonstrate the American and Western stereotypes of Native Americans, specifically that Native Americans are savage, primitive, idiotic, and inferior. This presentation will discuss perspectives on forced Americanization including the impact of boarding schools and colonization, and the objectification and sexualization of Native American women.
Sexualization of Women
Conclusion
The "Noble Savage" and the "Ignoble Savage"
The Death of Benjamin Wolfe,
1771.
The Death of Jane McCrea,
1804.
Noble Savage
Ignoble Savage
Indian Girls, Swinging
, ca. 1815
Colonists v. Native Americans
Forced Americanization
&
Boarding Schools
White Man's Learning
Miller 152
Free Labor > Academic/Vocational training Miller157
"The Indian Problem"
Woolford 38
Objectification of Native American Women
"Greetings from the Land of Plenty"
Where to begin?
Translation (Pratt)
Euro-centric tales (Helper)
Extermination (Hurtado)
Around 1930-1940
"Injin"
White settler views woman as a sexual object - not a person
Temptress there for his entertainment
Native American women portrayed today
Pocahontas
Gwen Stefani
Native American women often stereotyped as the "beautiful maiden" available to the white man (Nittle)
Stereotype as savages made it easier to objectify women (Pewewardy)
The American "Truth"
Danielle Nisim, Gracie McManus, Stacy Maier and Graham Caplan
Works Cited
Through our postcards, we have discussed various stereotypes of Native Americans, including the Noble and Ignoble Savage and sexualized images of Native American women, all of which resulted from forced Americanization and colonialism
Modern stereotypes originate from Colonial America (Prucha)
Colonists wanted to convert Native Americans to Christianity
Two types according to Prucha: Noble and Ignoble (Brute) Savages
Lived untouched by modern technology and conventions
"One with nature"
Europeans admired the noble savage for being dignified, brave and generous
Perverse, treacherous, violent and brute (Prucha)
Similar to wild animals
Most common stereotype (Schwarz)
Full transcript