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Theology anointing of the sick

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Jerome Gutierrez

on 25 February 2013

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Transcript of Theology anointing of the sick

Partial Fulfillment
in Theology 2 Mijares, Marinella
Lorenzo, Renzo
Maniba, Caryl
Lleno, Mikee
Mison, Buddy
Lledo, Carlo
Javier, Nicolie
Ignacio, Dojo
Ilas, Raselo
Gutierrez, Jerome Canonical Legislations Liturgy References Recipients Fomula Minister Matter Necessity Christian Meaning and Essence The BODY Anointing of the sick is administered to bring spiritual and even physical strength during an illness, especially near the time of death. It is the completion of our Christian life and it marks our final conformity to following in the footsteps of Christ. One of the essential elements of the rite of anointing of the sick is the prayer of the church community for comfort. rooted in the human experience of sickness and death the people of God taking care of each other; praying with and for them ministry to the sick is the responsibility of the entire church community The anointing of the sick consists of the laying on of hands by a priest, the prayers of the church, and the anointing with the oil of the sick. The continuous rite includes the celebration of penance, anointing and Eucharist. The matter used is oil which is known as Oil of the Sick. It Is made up of pure olive oil, nothing added except for the blessing of the Bishop. Another matter would be the laying of hands of Minister which signifies the sending of the Holy Spirit by Jesus. This is taken from the words of Christ himself when He said: “They will lay their hands on the sick and they will recover” (Mark 16:18).
Doubtfully valid materials for emergency: Vegetable oil. The essential rite of the sacrament consists in the priest (or priests, in the case of the Eastern Churches) laying hands on the sick, anointing him with blessed oil (usually olive oil blessed by a bishop, but in an emergency, any vegetable oil will suffice), and praying "Through this holy anointing may the Lord in his love and mercy help you with the grace of the Holy Spirit. May the Lord who frees you from sin save you and raise you up." "May the Lord who frees you from sin save you and raise you up." Amen.
When circumstances permit, the Church recommends that the sacrament take place during Mass, or at least that it be preceded by Confession and followed by Holy Communion.
Canon 1003
1. Every priest, and only a priest, validly administers the anointing of the sick.
2. All priests to whom the care of souls has been committed have the duty and the right to administer the anointing of the sick to all the faithful committed to their pastoral office; for a reasonable cause any other priest can administer this sacrament with at least the presumed consent of the aforementioned priest.
3. Every priest is allowed to carry blessed oil with him so that he can administer the sacrament of the anointing of the sick in case of necessity.
4. Only priests (including bishops) can administer the Sacrament of the Anointing of the Sick, since, when the sacrament was instituted during Christ's sending out of His disciples, it was confined to the men who would become the original bishops of the Church.
The minister of the sacrament is a priest or bishop. Deacons, religious men or women, and lay men or women, are not valid ministers of the Sacrament. The Holy See recently published the following doctrinal note, drafted by the Pope while still Prefect of the doctrinal congregation. Following this biblical understanding, the Catechism of the Catholic Church notes that:
The Anointing of the Sick "is not a sacrament for those only who are at the point of death. Hence, as soon as anyone of the faithful begins to be in danger of death from sickness or old age, the fitting time for him to receive this sacrament has certainly already arrived."
1. As he is about to confer the sacrament of anointing of the sick the priest should see to it, if at all possible, that the following preparations are made. There should be in the sick-room a table covered with a white cloth; and on it a container with cotton or similar material made into six separate pellets for wiping the parts anointed, a small piece Of bread for cleansing the priest's fingers, and a bowl for washing his hands; a wax candle to be ignited later to give light to the priest as he performs the anointings In fine, it shall be his concern that everything is as clean and orderly as possible for the administration of this sacrament.
Introductory Prayers

The three introductory prayers that follow are very much the same as those ordinarily used for a priest's visit to the home of a sick person. They are preceded by the peace-greeting, the sacramental of sprinkling with holy water, which commonly is a reminder of baptism and an occasion for renewing the baptismal promises, confession if the person wishes to confess, and a little sermon in which the priest offers some consoling thoughts along with a summary of the nature and effects of the sacrament of the sick (see the introduction). If time permits the priest may choose to read one of the psalms and one or the other gospel passages taken from the rite of visitation and care of the sick.

3. Arriving at the place where the sick person is confined... February 26, 2012 Introduction

Mark refers to the sacrament when he recounts how Jesus sent out the twelve disciples to preach, and "they cast out many demons, and anointed with oil many that were sick and healed them" (Mark 6:13). In his epistle, James says, "Is any among you sick? Let him call for the elders of the church, and let them pray over him, anointing him with oil in the name of the Lord; and the prayer of faith will save the sick man, and the Lord will raise him up; and if he has committed sins, he will be forgiven" (Jas. 5:14–15). The sacrament has a serious effect to the person that will go through it. The man will be reunited with Christ. He will be forgiven for his sins, his spiritual health will be restored and he will be prepared for the eternal life.

The sacrament is not necessarily for the one who is dying but it’s also for the person who is sick, not physically but spiritually. Some of the sick may not be healed by medicines or medical operations alone but personally, by the Lord. His soul might be in need of spiritual healing of Christ and through this, he should be healed. Through this sacrament, Jesus heals. Early Practices Early Third Century Twentieth Century Sixteenth Century First Millennium Historical Historical and Biblical Background Biblical The chief Biblical text concerning anointing of the sick is James 5:14–15: "Are any among you sick? They should call for the elders of the Church and have them pray over them, anointing them with oil in the name of the Lord. And their prayer offered in faith will heal the sick, and the Lord will make them well. And if they have committed sins, these will be forgiven." Matthew 10:8, Luke 10:8–9 and Mark 6:13 are also quoted in this regard. Effects "The special grace of the sacrament of the Anointing of the Sick has as its effects: the uniting of the sick person to the passion of Christ, for his own good and that of the whole Church; the strengthening, peace, and courage to endure in a Christian manner the sufferings of illness or old age; the forgiveness of sins, if the sick person was not able to obtain it through the sacrament of penance; the restoration of health, if it is conducive to the salvation of his soul; the preparation for passing over to eternal life" (CCC 1532).
Does a person have to be dying to receive this sacrament? No. The Catechism says, "The anointing of the sick is not a sacrament for those only who are at the point of death. Hence, as soon as anyone of the faithful begins to be in danger of death from sickness or old age, the fitting time for him to receive this sacrament has certainly already arrived" (CCC 1514). Fomula First, before the anointing of the sick an introductory rite is done, a brief reminder to the people gathered and recipient that the sacrament is intended for healing then recalling the words of James “ Is anyone among you sick? They should call the elders of the church and have them pray over them, anointing them with olive oil in the name of the Lord. The prayer said in faith will save the sick and the Lord will raise them up; and anyone who has committed sin will be forgiven” ( James 5:14-15) Then the penitential rite is done, followed by the Liturgy of the word and homily, then a litany is prayed “ which focuses the attention of everyone on the person who is to be anointed and his or her particular need for an experience of God’s healing power” (Ligouri,88) Then the priest lays his hands on the recipient and a silent prayer. Then he anoints the sick and says : "Through this holy anointing may the Lord in his love and mercy help you with the grace of the Holy Spirit. May the Lord who frees you from sin save you and raise you up." "May the Lord who frees you from sin save you and raise you up." Then it is followed by the recitation of the Lord’s prayer; reception of the communion or in case of dying the viaticum, and then the final blessing and traditional prayer of dismissal “let us go in peace to love and serve the lord” Time and Place Valid Sponsorship A baptized person who belongs to a non-Catholic ecclesial community may be admitted only in company with a catholic sponsor, and then simply as a witness to the baptism. To be admitted to undertake the office of sponsor, a person must be appointed by the candidate for baptism, or by the parents or whoever stands in their place, or failing these, by the parish priest or the minister; to be appointed the person must be suitable for this role and have the intention of fulfilling it The anointing of the sick is administered to bring spiritual and even physical strength during an illness, especially near the time of death. It is most likely one of the last sacraments one will receive. A sacrament is an outward sign established by Jesus Christ to confer inward grace. In more basic terms, it is a rite that is performed to convey God’s grace to the recipient, through the power of the Holy Spirit.
2. Then the clerics or servers are summoned, or at least one cleric to carry the cross (one without a staff, not the processional cross), holy water and aspersory, and the Ritual. The priest himself reverently takes the vessel containing the oil of the sick (encased in a silk cover of purple color), and bears it carefully so that it will not spill. If the journey is long or is to be made on horseback (sic!), or if there is any danger whatever of spilling the holy oil, the vessel enclosed in the sack or burse as already stated should be suspended from the neck so that it can be carried more easily and securely. No bells are rung in the course of the journey.
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Thank You.
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