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Cultivating High Performing Teams

How To Build Effective Teams with Responsible Leaders
by

Angela Johnson

on 13 July 2014

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Transcript of Cultivating High Performing Teams

Cultivating High Performing Teams
7 Habits of High Performing Teams
Accountability

ROLE MODEL








Effective Leadership
Cultivating High Performing Teams
How To Build Effective Teams with Responsible Leaders
Establishing An Unified Purpose
Communication And Innovation
Four Stages of Team Development
With good team-building skills, you can unite employees around a common goal and generate greater productivity. Without them, you limit yourself and the staff to the effort each individual can make alone. Team building is an ongoing process that helps a work group evolve into a cohesive unit. The team members not only share expectations for accomplishing group tasks, but trust and support one another and respect one another's individual differences. Your role as a team builder is to lead your team toward cohesiveness and productivity.

Every effective team must have an effective leader. The “go to” guy for effective problem solving. This leader is trustworthy, efficient, and fosters an atmosphere of growth.

True leadership creates measurable results within the organization.

Although great leaders come in many different shapes and sizes- the 3 most important skills necessary for an individual to be an effective leader are as follow: he or she is well organized, takes full responsibility for the team, and is a positive role model for all those whom one comes into contact with.
HONESTY and TRUSTWORTHY
POWERFUL DELEGATOR
ACCEPTS RESPONSIBILITY
EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATOR
POSITIVE “CAN DO” ATTITUDE
Setting an atmosphere of unity
and purpose is how you build a team.
It’s the ability to get team members inspired.
It’s about dealing with emotions, building high emotions and creating an inspired team. High performing teams always inspires, even though there's stress and challenge.

A leader has to make everybody feel like they belong – even if they don’t like them.

Of course, typically after creating a bond you learn to like the person. You discover some part of them that brings you together.

With team members who don't want to belong, you have to say, “Do you really want to belong to this team? If you are ambivalent, it’s going to be a source of conflict.”

Show Respect Through Example

People want to feel they have power over themselves.

That's why asking a question is so important in any leadership activity,
and being able, where possible, to give people choice and power over what they can do.

When you delegate, you open up possibilities to let people shine.

Encouraging Participation
Unified Purpose
Setting an atmosphere of unity
and purpose is how you build a team.

It’s the ability to get team members inspired.

It’s about dealing with emotions, building high emotions and creating an inspired team. High performing teams always inspires, even though there's stress and challenge.

Adopting Goals
In this stage, most team members are positive and polite. Some are anxious, as they haven't fully understood what work the team will do. Others are simply excited about the task ahead.

As leader, you play a dominant role at this stage, because team members' roles and responsibilities aren't clear.

This stage can last for some time, as people start to work together, and as they make an effort to get to know their new colleagues.

Storming often starts where there is a conflict between team members' natural working styles. People may work in different ways for all sorts of reasons, but if differing working styles cause unforeseen problems, they may become frustrated.

Storming can also happen in other situations. For example, team members may challenge your authority, or jockey for position as their roles are clarified. Or, if you haven't defined clearly how the team will work, people may feel overwhelmed by their workload, or they could be uncomfortable with the approach you're using.

Gradually, the team moves into the norming stage. This is when people start to resolve their differences, appreciate colleagues' strengths, and respect your authority as a leader.

Now that your team members know one-another better, they may socialize together, and they are able to ask each other for help and provide constructive feedback. People develop a stronger commitment to the team goal, and you start to see good progress towards it.

There is often a prolonged overlap between storming and norming, because, as new tasks come up, the team may lapse back into behavior from the storming stage.

The team reaches the performing stage when hard work leads, without friction, to the achievement of the team's goal. The structures and processes that you have set up support this well.

As leader, you can delegate much of your work, and you can concentrate on developing team members.
It feels easy to be part of the team at this stage, and people who join or leave won't disrupt performance.
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