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Leading the Way to Food Safety

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on 9 April 2014

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Transcript of Leading the Way to Food Safety

CDC Estimates in 2011
1 in 6 Americans sick from foodborne illness each year
48 Million Illnesses
128 Thousand Hospitalizations
3 Thousand Deaths
Risk Factors that Contribute to Foodborne Illness
Employee Hygiene
Food From Unsafe Sources
Contaminated
Equipment
Improper Cooking Temperatures
Improper Holding
How to Wash Hands
Warm, running water
Soap
Minimum of 20 seconds
Disposable paper towels
Must have a handwashing sign at every handsink
When to exclude or limit employee food contact
Exclude when exhibiting symptoms of illness such as...
Nausea
Vomiting
Diarrhea
Jaundice
Limit when:

Cold Symptoms: Cough, Runny Nose, Fever (without flu-like sympoms), Sore Throat.
When to wash hands
Wash hands when contamination occurs
Before starting work
Between activities
Handling dirty to clean dishes
After working with raw meats
Eating, drinking, using tobacco
Using the restroom
Before putting new gloves on
"The Big 5" Illnesses
These are reportable illnesses
Do not enter a food establishment with any of these illnesses!
NOROVIRUS
Nausea, vomiting, abdominal cramps, diarrhea, & fever
Ecoli 0157:H7
Hepatitis A
Shigella
Salmonella
Typhi
Last but not least, wear a hat or hair net!
You Don't Want it.
Food should be obtained from sources that comply with law.
No home prepared food.
Food should be received at proper temperatures.
Packages must be in good condition to protect integrity of food, i.e. can dents.

Contamination
Physical Contamination
Hair
Wrappers/ Stickers
Glass (light Bulbs)
All lights above food storage and food prep areas must be covered or rubber coated.
Chemical Contamination
Pesticides
Sanitizer that is too strong
Other chemicals
This is why chemical separation and labeling is important.
Biological
Bacteria, parasites, viruses, other pathogens.
These can all be prevented by good hygienic practices, proper hot and cold holding, time as control, proper cook temps and good cooling methods.
Frequency of Cleaning
Any food contact surface that comes into contact with Potentially Hazardous Foods must be cleaned every
WASH
Warm, soapy water
Soapy water removes food
Scrub if necessary
No sponges!
RINSE
Remove all soap and suds from surfaces with clean water.
Hours
Food contact surfaces that do not come into contact with Potentially Hazardous Foods must be cleaned every
Hours
What are Potentially Hazardous Foods?
RAW MEAT
&
COOKED MEAT
CUT MELONS
CUT LEAFY GREENS
&
CUT TOMATOES
COOKED
VEGETABLE
MATTER
DAIRY PRODUCTS
EGGS
OPENED CANNED
POTENTIALLY HAZARDOUS
FOODS
COOKED STARCHY MATTER
(RICE, NOODLES, OTHER GRAINS, ETC.)
165° F
155° F
145° F
Farm Raised Game Animals
Fish
Eggs
Whole Muscle Beef & Pork
Cook Temperatures for Various Foods
All Poultry
Stuffed Meats
All Reheated Food
Ground/ Combined Meats
Mechanically Tenderized Meat
Injected Meat
135° F
Commercially Prepared/ precooked food
Vegetables
HOT HOLDING
Foods held hot must be held at 135° F or above
Datemarking
Mark foods with the prepared on or use by date (or both)
Foods should be held no more than 7 days (including the day opened or prepared)
All expired foods should be discarded
First in, first out (FIFO)
Cooling Step #1
Cool all potentially hazardous foods from 135°F
Cooling Step #2
To 70°F in
2 hours
Then from 70°F
to 41°F in an additional
4 hours
THE COOLING PROCESS
HOW TO COOL FOODS
Uncovered
Small Portions
Shallow, Metal Pans
Stir Frequently
Use Ice Bath/ Ice Wands if Needed

All house prepared and cooled foods must be reheated to 165° in a minimum of 2 hours
Reheating
THAWING
In Cold Holding Unit
Under Cold Running Water
In Microwave
Time Only as a Public Health Control
SOP required
Discard Potentially Hazardous Foods After 4 Hours
CHEMICALS
Store away from food
Label for proper identification
STORAGE
Store wiping cloths in sanitizer bucket when not in use
Store food and equipment on shelves, not on floor
TRASH
Keep dumpster lids shut
Cover trashcans when not in use
Make sure dumpster plug is installed
CONTROL PESTS
Throw out trash regularly
Keep food covered
Keep counters and floors clean and free of debris
Dispose of cardboard regularly
When a pest is spotted, use approved methods to remove
Never use pesticides that are not approved for use in restaurants
Good Retail Practices
Please silence electronic devices.


Bathrooms are located in the hallway to the right as you leave the meeting room.
Feel free to ask questions at any time!
www.facebook.com/ottawacountyfoodnetwork
Like us on Facebook!

Get to Know Your Inspectors
Jessica Voglewede
Holland Township
Vending
Kevin Hoxsey
Holland City
Standardized trainer for new employees
Amanda Echler
Allendale and surrounding areas
Foodborne outbreaks
Adam Zantello
Grand Haven and Spring Lake
Handles Smoke Free Air and Education
Anastasia Endres-Bercher
Zeeland, Hudsonville, and Jenison
Inspects body art facilities
Plan Review for new establishments
Accounts for 90% of all foodborne illnesses
Objective
Introduction
Discuss food safety importance and statistics
Explain the 5 risk factors in a kitchen
Conclusion
Take the test!
Who are we?
Food Safety Services Team
miottawa.org/food
616-393-5645
INTRODUCTION
Final Questions?
Important Takeaway
Points
Food should never be held at temperatures in the Danger Zone!
Food should come from approved sources in good condition.
Wash hands properly and frequently.
Don't work when you're sick.
Wash, rinse, then sanitize to prevent contamination.
Cook foods to the correct temperature.
Datemark foods and throw away anything expired.
TEST TIME!
Diarrhea (often bloody), abdominal pain, and vomiting.
Diarrhea, jaudice, and flu-like symptoms.
Abdominal cramps, fever, and diarrhea
Diarrhea, fever, abdominal cramps, vomiting, headache, chills, etc.
Not Salmonellosis
Separation
All raw meats should be stacked in descending order of cook temps.
Fish
Beef
Ground Meat
Chicken
Leading the Way to Food Safety
Good Retail Practices
SANITIZE
Select Your Sanitizer
Use an appropriate test kit to check concentration.
Air Dry
Allow a full air dry before use.
Do not stack equipment wet.
3 Ingredients to Proper Sanitization
Iodine
Quaternary Ammonia
Chlorine
Test Kit
COLD HOLDING
Foods held cold should be held at temperatures of 41
°
F or below.
Calibrating Your Thermometer
Using an ice bath, a thermometer should read 32F.
Use mostly ice and a little cold water.
Calibrate at least once a week
Measuring Food Temperatures
Always take temperatures in the warmest part of the cooling unit:
Walk-in: center of food.
Makeline: top 1 inch of food.
Quiz Time
Quiz Time
Quiz Time
DO NOT TAKE THE HIGHWAY TO THE DANGER ZONE!
Full transcript