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Genres in Children's Literature

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Caroline Kelley

on 10 October 2014

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Transcript of Genres in Children's Literature

Genres in Children's Literature
Genres In Children's Literature
Fiction
Nonfiction
Poetry
Fiction
Traditional
Literature

Fables
Folktales
Myths
Legends + Hero Tales
Folk Epics
Fantasy
High Fantasy
Fantastic Stories
Science Fiction
Historical Realism
Contemporary
Fiction

Mysteries
+ Thrillers
Animal Stories
Contemporary Realism
Nonfiction
Poetry
By Caroline Kelley
Informational
Books

Biography
Nursery Rhymes
Nonsense
Poetry
Orally authored by “everyday” people from cultures around the world and various time periods, yet they express the same desire for “social acceptance and material comfort” that show “the universality of human wishes.” Traditional literature has been recorded, retold and often adapted for children.



Short stories with clear conflicts, where the purpose of the story is a moral or lesson stated at the end of the fable. The characters are often animals who represent single traits.
The Lion and the Mouse By Jerry Pinkney
Quick stories that use rhyme, a simple chronological plot, and repeating phrases and imagery to make them memorable. The characters are people or personified animals living in vague settings with tones ranging from dark to sentimental. The themes and settings vary, however are similar between stories. Endings are often brief and can be a short as “they lived happily ever after.” The multiple subgenres often overlap each other.
Fairy Tales
• Featuring magic, spells, enchantment and happy endings.
• Common characters: fairies, witches, royalty, stepmothers, elves
Noodlehead
Stories
About a kind character who makes lots of mistakes
Tall Tales
Fantastical tales of folk heroes or heroines
Cummulative
Tales
Story builds by a "series of additions"
Pourquoi
Stories
"Pourquoi" meaning "why" in French, pourquoi stories provide explainations, often of naturual phenomena.
Talking
Beast Tales
Folktales in which most of the characters are personified animals, occasionally interacting with a person.
“stories that originate in the beliefs of nations and present episodes in which supernatural forces operate”
Myths Explain:
creation, religion, and divinities
meaning of life and death
causes of good and evil

Stories describe human nature and interpret the world.
The plot of a myth is usually a single event, with a brief setting.
A close relative of myths, legends and hero tales have a basis in historical era, but feature less supernatural events. Characters are heroic figures whose stories have been exaggerated.
“A long narrative poem of unknown authorship about an outstanding or royal character in a series of adventures related to that heroic central figure”
Epics are filled with vivid detail and mirror the values of the society.

Setting: Countries, Continents or the Universe
Point of View: objective
Tone: dignified
Style: elevated
"Fantasy depicts a world unlike the one we usually call real" -Perry Nodelmam
Readers suspend their dis-belief because the "imaginary universe is so credible"
o Focus:
• conflict of good and evil
• time and memory
• growth and sex
• strangeness of the world

A quest story with a courageous protagonist and well developed and complete characters and setting
"Stories realistic in most details, but still requiring us to willing suspend our disbelief"
Talking
Animal Stories
Animals are personified and are fully realized characters
“science fiction is literature about something that hasn’t happened yet, but might be possible someday. That it might be possible is the important part; that's what separates science fiction from fantasy." -William Sleator
Dystopian
Literature
A science fiction story in which a dark future is imagined
"Contemporary fiction includes any work of fiction that takes place in modern times”
Plots can be linear or non linear.
Includes novels, short stories, prose, picture books, and graphic novels.
Often there are cross-overs between the many subgenres.
Often suspenseful, mysteries and thrillers are carried by the plot. They use foreshadowing to allude to what will happen. Common settings include large old houses with empty rooms, abandoned buildings and graveyards.
Subtypes:
detective stories
crime
espionage
gothic (ghosts and horror)
Animal Realism
Animals act as they would in real life they are not personified
Animal Fiction
Animals are personified and animals vs. nature is a common theme.
Romance
A mostly realistic novel with a focus on a romantic relationship
Coming-of-Age
A Self aware protagonist grows and changes during the story gaining understanding, courage or sensitivity.
Often related to or include family stories, where growth is in relation to family
Problem-Centered Stories
The realistic problem or struggle of the protagonist is central to the story. This conflict often relates to social injustices of race, gender, disability or social position.
Historical fiction combines the element of a fiction stories with historical accurate settings, events and language.
Set in a historical time, place and/or era which the author gives a detail descriptions of for the reader.
Frequently address “complicated topics, social issues and traumatic events from history”
Informational books are nonfiction texts that teach about one or more topics engaging a child's curiosity. They can be written as expository or narrative texts.
Expository Styles
non-narrative texts
Chronological
Comparison/Contrast
Question and Answer
Spatial Structure
Narrative Styles
Factual texts written in the narrative form to be more accessible to children
Tone: "satisfies and stimulates the reader" while avoiding pandering to the reader
Characteristics of Good Information Books
Style: "should assist children's understanding with interesting and descriptive sentences."
Visuals: uses a variety of interesting visual formats: illustrations, artwork, photography and graphics.
"The true account or story of the life or a segment of the life of an individual."
Should included less flattering information and avoid stereotyping
Characteristics of Good Biographies
Style: should engage the reader and be clear and factual without didacticism
Sources used should be documented and fictionalized elements identified
Authentic Biography
An accurate account of a significant person by a biographer with documented research
Episodic Biography
a biography of a shorter period in someones life
Autobiographies + Memoirs
"Written by its subject or in conjunction with its subject, cannot be totally objective because the narrated events are filtered through the writer's own consciousness"
Memoirs focus more on the feelings and memories of the subject
Short, often, humorous rhyming poems that feature sound effects, figurative language and irony
Poetry that "plays on our pleasure in the illogical and the incongruous" Traditionally written in limericks with quick, rhyming lines.
"Poetry stands as an aesthetic experience in itself. Rhythm, sound, and connotation expand meaning: imagery heightens our sensory awareness; and apt figurative comparisons temp our imaginations."
Narrative Poetry: situational or tells a story including the subgenre of ballads
Lyric Poetry: poems in the form of a song
Literary Elements Found in Poetry
meter
sound patterns, internal rhymes/off rhymes
extend metaphors
figurative language
imagery
emotional intensity
Compact Poetry: written with as little words as possible.
Concrete Poetry: words form a shape related to the poem
Syllable Poetry: A Haiku and a Sijo require a specific number of syllables
(Lukens, Smith, and Coffel, 2012, p. 78)
(Lukens, et al., 2012, p. 80)
(Lukens, et al., 2012, p. 81)
(Lukens, et al., 2012, p. 82)
(Lukens, et al., 2012, p. 83)
(Lukens, et al., 2012, p. 84)
(as cited in Lukens, et al., 2012, p. 85)
(Lukens, et al., 2012, p. 88)
(Lukens, et al., 2012, p. 97)
(Lukens, et al., 2012, p. 325)
(Lukens, et al., 2012, p. 316)
(Lukens, et al., 2012, p. 284)
(Lukens, et al., 2012, p. 263)
References
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Adler, D. A., & Malley, K. (1997). Chanukah in Chelm. New York: Lothrop, Lee & Shepard/Morrow.
Babbitt, N. (1975). Tuck everlasting. New York: Farrar, Straus, Giroux.
Beil, K. M. (1999). Fire in their eyes: wildfires and the people who fight them. San Diego: Harcourt Brace.
Bishop, N. (2000). Digging for bird-dinosaurs: An expedition to Madagascar. Boston: Houghton Mifflin.
Bryant, W. C. (1898). The Illiad of Homer. Boston, N.Y.: Houghton Mifflin.
Cannon, J. (1993). Stellaluna. San Diego: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich.
Carroll, L. (1963). Alice's adventures in wonderland. New York: Macmillan.
Cole, J., & Degen, B. (1999). The magic school bus explores the senses. New York: Scholastic Press.
Collins, S. (2008). The hunger games. New York: Scholastic Press.
Creech, S. (2001). Love that dog. New York: HarperCollins.
D'aulaires' book of Greek myths. (2010). New York, NY: Paw Prints.
Dahl, R. (1982). The BFG. New York: Farrar, Straus, Giroux.
Dahl, R. (1984). Boy: tales of childhood. New York: Farrar, Straus, Giroux.
Dessen, S. (2006). Just listen: a novel. New York: Viking Children's Books.
Draper, S. M. (2010). Out of my mind. New York: Atheneum Books for Young Readers.
Egielski, R. (1997). The gingerbread boy. New York, N.Y.: Laura Geringer Book.
Freedman, R. (1993). Eleanor Roosevelt: A life of discovery. New York: Clarion Books.
Freedman, R. (1998). Martha Graham, a dancer's life. New York: Clarion Books.
Freedman, R. (2010). The war to end all wars: World War I. Boston, MA: Clarion Books.
Gaiman, N. (2002). Coraline. New York: HarperCollins.
Giff, P. R. (2008). Eleven. New York: Wendy Lamb Books.
Gustafson, S. (2007). Favorite nursery rhymes from Mother Goose. Seymour, CT: Greenwich Workshop Press.
Hamilton, V. (1988). In the beginning: Creation stories from around the world. San Diego: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich.
Heaney, S., & Niles, J. D. (2008). Beowulf: An illustrated edition. New York: W.W. Norton.
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Isaacs, A. (1994). Swamp angel. New York: Dutton Children's Books.
Kellogg, S. (1988). Johnny Appleseed. New York: Morrow Junior Books.
Konigsburg, E. L. (1967). From the mixed-up files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler. New York: Atheneum.
Lear, E. (1943). Edward Lear's Nonsense omnibus. London: F. Warne.
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Li, C. (2008). Dancing to freedom: the true story of Mao's last dancer. New York: Walker & Co.
Littlesugar, A. (1999). Tree of hope. New York: Philomel Books.
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Lowry, L. (1993). The giver. Boston: Houghton Mifflin.
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White, E. B. (1952). Charlotte's web. New York: Harper.
White, R. (2007). Way Down Deep. New York: Farrar Straus Giroux.
Wiesner, D. (1999). Sector 7. New York: Clarion Books.
Willems, M. (2007). Today I will fly!. New York: Hyperion Books for Children

Schanzer, R. (2004). George vs. George: The American Revolution as seen from both sides. Washington, DC: National Geographic.
Scott, E. (2004). Poles apart: Why penguins and polar bears will never be neighbors. New York: Viking.
Sharmat, M. W. (1972). Nate the great. New York: Coward, McCann & Geoghegan.
Sidman, J. (2006). Meow ruff: A story in concrete poetry.. New York: Houghton Mifflin.
Simon, S. (1991). Earthquakes. New York: Morrow Junior Books.
Sidman, J. Play, Mozart, play!. New York: Greenwillow Books.
Smith, D. (19871984). Harry's Mad. New York: Crown.
Stevens, J. (1984). The tortoise and the hare: An Aesop fable. New York: Holiday House.
Talbott, H. (2003). Safari journal: The adventures in Africa of Carey Monroe. San Diego: Harcourt.
Taylor, M. D. (1976). Roll of thunder, hear my cry. New York: Dial Press.
Wallace, B. (1980). A dog called Kitty. New York, NY: Holiday House.
Waller, S. (1994). The House of stairs. London: Penguin Books.
Walt Disney's story of the three little pigs. (1953). Racine, Wis.: Golden Press.
Watson, C. (1971). Father Fox's pennyrhymes. New York: Crowell.
White, E. B. (1952). Charlotte's web. New York: Harper.
White, R. (2007). Way Down Deep. New York: Farrar Straus Giroux.
Wiesner, D. (1999). Sector 7. New York: Clarion Books.
Willems, M. (2007). Today I will fly!. New York: Hyperion Books for Children
Children's Literary Genres Poster
*for large scale printing
Genre Activity 1
Fiction vs. Nonfiction
Learning Objective: students will be able to determine if a book is fiction or nonfiction. (Grade 1-3)

Prepare a selection of fiction and non fiction books for students to read and categorize

Students are asked to select three books for silent reading time. After they read the books, students classify them as fiction or nonfiction explaining to a partner classmate why they believe so. Each set of partners must agree and then they confirm with the teacher.
Genre Activity 2
A Field Guide to Folktales
Learning Objective: students will be able to describe the various types of folktales and give examples of each. (Grades 3-6)

After studying the various kinds of folktales as a unit study. Students create "field guides" for folktales. The field guides should have one page for each type of folktale and give one example of each type of folktale. Students are to show what they have learned about folktales over the course of the unit.
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