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Free Modifier Review

Reviewing Free Modifiers--ING Phrases, Absolute Phrases, Noun Clusters, Adjective Clusters
by

Randy Hisner

on 9 November 2016

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Transcript of Free Modifier Review

Free Modifiers--Review
ING Phrases
Absolute Phrases
Adjective Clusters
Noun Clusters
Can be added to provide secondary action to the main action
Allow you to add alternate labels to a person or thing,
thus defining it more thoroughly
Zoom in on a detail of the subject to refine the picture
Example: The captain steered the ship, HIS EYES ON THE HORIZON, THE BILL OF HIS CAP PULLED LOW TO SHADE HIS EYES.
The runner charged the hill, PUMPING HIS ARMS FORCEFULLY, HOPING TO CATCH THE LEADER.

Or: PUMPING HIS ARMS FORCEFULLY, the runner, HOPING TO CATCH THE LEADER, charged the hill.
He suddenly appeared around the corner, A HUGE, HULKING FIGURE IN THE DARK.
The referee, EXHAUSTED AND FRUSTRATED, soon lost his patience with the coach.
Adjective clusters allow you to add descriptive words to
any noun or pronoun in the sentence to paint a more vivid picture of it. To qualify as an adjective cluster, the adjectives must be out of the usual positions--i.e., they can't be right before the noun (The huge, ferocious tiger approached the herd.) or right after a linking verb (The tiger was huge and ferocious.).
STUNNED BY THE NEWS, the kids sat there, SAD, SPEECHLESS,
UNABLE TO FUNCTION.
Everyone was fascinated by the multi-talented Uncle Harold--FISHERMAN, WRITER, MEDIATOR, INVENTOR, HISTORIAN.
Add at least four free modifiers to this sentence:
"The cowboy grabbed the steer."
Opening appositives appear at the beginning of the sentence and need only one comma. They MUST have a logical connection to the rest of the sentence.
Bad: A skilled seamstress, Nancy often watched Netflix.

Good: A skilled seamstress, Nancy often mended her children's clothes.

The bad example would be all right if we turned it into a traditional appositive: Nancy, a skilled seamstress, often watched Netflix.

Another good one: A devoted reader, Michael regularly visited his local library.
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