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Jim Valvano - Transformational Leader

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Carole Phipps

on 4 November 2013

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Transcript of Jim Valvano - Transformational Leader

Jim Valvano - Transformational Leader
Raise Level of Morality
Ray Martin was an assistant to Valvano at NCSU from 1980-1988. Martin is quoted, "[Valvano] was someone who epitomized the same values my mom and dad had instilled in me in regard to hard work and being a good citizen" (Towle, 2001, p. 142).
Jim Valvano
Transformational Leader
Transform The Situation
Poor Record
In the 1982-1983 season, NCSU entered the NCAA basketball tournament with 10 losses. Prior to this season, no team had ever won the NCAA championship with such a poor record (Weinberg, n.d.).
Cutting Down the Nets
During one practice, at the beginning of every season, Valvano would have his players simply practice cutting down the nets (Wiley, 2013).
Inspirational Motivation
An application of inspirational motivation is for leaders to use symbols and emotional appeals to help followers realize a shared vision (Northouse, 2013). Valvano's "cutting down the nets" practice is evidence of such a symbol.
Although the victory was the effort of the team of players and coaches, at times individuals were Valvano's focus.
Individualized Consideration
Idealized Influence
Northouse (2013) describes idealized influence as a circumstance where followers want to emulate their leader. Martin described Valvano as someone he could look up to (Towle, 2001).
Create a Connection
Towle (2001) reports that Derrick Whittenberg felt that Valvano knew his players as people and knew what they thought. According to Northouse (2013), Individualized consideration would allow a personal relationship with each player to enable the leader to know what the followers think.
Attend to the Needs of Others
In an interview of Thurl Bailey, 1983 championship team member, Doing (2013) records Bailey saying “[Valvano] was the kind of guy who prepared you for more than just basketball. He was preparing you for life.”
Helps Followers Reach Their Fullest Potential
On April 4, 1983, NCSU defeated Houston, 54-52 (Bozello, n.d.). Go Pack!
References
Doing, C. (Performer) (2013). Thurl bailey remembers Jim
Valvano [Radio series episode]. In Flight 750 with Chad Doing. Portland, OR: 750 The Game. Retrieved from http://www.750thegame.com/pages/landing?blockID=676479
Engage With Others
Howard (n.d.) says that Valvano engaged people by making them feel as like they mattered to him. In addition, he inspired and motivated them. This is another application of the tenet of transformational leadership, inspirational motivation (Northouse, 2013).
Quotes
“How do you go from where you are to where you wanna be? And I think you have to have an enthusiasm for life. You have to have a dream, a goal. And you have to be willing to work for it.”
“I asked a ref if he could give me a technical foul for thinking bad things about him. He said, of course not. I said, well, I think you stink. And he gave me a technical. You can’t trust em.”
“There are 86,400 seconds in a day. It’s up to you to decide what to do with them.”
“Don’t give up. Don’t ever give up.”
Intellectual Stimulation
Northouse (2013) describes intellectual stimulation as challenging ones own beliefs and the beliefs of the leader. By encouraging his players to challenge beliefs, Valvano prepared his players for life beyond college basketball.
Weinberg, R. (n.d.) 15: Nc state dunks houston in ncaa final. ESPN 25. Retrieved from sports.espn.go.com/
espn/espn25/story?page=moments/15
Northouse, P. (2013). Leadership: Theory and practice. (6th ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage
Publications, Inc.
Towle, M. (2001). The Valvano Legacy. In I remember Jim Valvano: Personal reflections and anecdotes
about college basketball's coach as told by the people and players who knew him. Nashville, TN: Cumberland House Publishing.
Wiley, J. (n.d.). Cutting down the net: Believe in your financial dream. Retrieved from https://www.google.com/
search?q=john+wiley+cutting+down+the+net%3A+belive+in+your+financial+dream&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a

Bozello, J. (n.d.). 1983 Men's NCAA basketball tournament. CBSSports.com. Retrieved from http://
www.cbssports.com/collegebasketball/ncaa-tournament/history/yearbyyear/1983
Howard, J. (n.d.) Jim Valvano 1946-1993. The V Foundation for cancer research. Retrieved from
http://www.jimmyv.org/about-us/remembering-jim/jim-valvano-1946-1993/
ESPN (Producer). (2013, February 5). 30 for 30: Survive and advance trailer. [YouTube video].
Retrieved from www.youtube.com/watch?v=ob1X6c5hXZc
Every single day and in every walk of life, ordinary people do extraordinary things."
Video by ESPN
Full transcript