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The World of Shel Silverstein

More information about the life of Shel Silverstein and his writing style
by

Karlo C

on 18 February 2013

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Transcript of The World of Shel Silverstein

Silverstein's target audience is mostly children. This causes much of his work to be light, innocent, and humorous.

Silverstein achieves this mood by his clever use of figurative language.

For example, in Silverstein's "The Crocodile's Toothache," Silverstein uses personification to bring a humorous take on what would be a traumatic experience for a child. CAREER Where the Sidewalk Ends 4 Questions Works Cited Start Childhood Figurative Language: Four Questions "Shel Silverstein." "LitFinder Contemporary Collection." Detroit: Gale, 2007. LitFinder for Schools. Web. 14 Feb. 2013.

Shel Siverstein. "Shel Silverstein" "Publishers Weekly" 208.8 (24 Feb. 1975): 50-52. Rpt. in "Children's Literature Review". Ed. Tom Burn and Allison Marion. Vol. 96. Detroit: Gale, 2004. "Literature Resource Center". Web. 14 Feb. 2013.

Silverstein, Shel. "Where the Sidewalk Ends". New York: Harper Collins, 2002. Print. The World of Shel Silverstein Karlo Capareda Silverstein served in the U.S. Army in Japan an Korea

Silverstein began his career as a cartoonist for the military publication "Stars and Stripes."

He began writing children's books and poems after a friend convinced him to.

He has won two Grammy Awards. One for his country song "A Boy Named Sue," and another for his poetry collection "Where the Sidewalk Ends." Writing Traits Form and Structure: Where was Silverstein born?

Did Silverstein write the country song, "A Boy Named Sue?"

True or False. Silverstein served in the U.S. Army.

True or False. Silverstein won a Grammy Award. Sound Devices: Where the Sidewalk Ends There is a place where the sidewalk ends
And before the streets begin,
And there the grass grows soft and white,
And there the sun burns crimson bright,
And there the moon-bird rests from his flight
To cool in the peppermint wind.

Let us leave this place where the smoke blows black
And the dark street winds and bends.
Past the pits where the asphalt flowers grow
We shall walk with a walk the is measured and slow,
And watch where the chalk-white arrows go
To the place where the sidewalk ends.

Yes we'll walk with a walk that is measured and slow
And watch where the chalk-white arrows go
For the children, they mark, and the children they know
The place where the sidewalk ends. Shel Silverstein was born in Chicago, Illinois.

When he was younger, he wanted to be a baseball player. However, he was really bad at it. He also couldn't dance, so he began to write. Silverstein uses alliteration in this line, "We shall walk with a walk that is measured and slow," to slow down the rhythm and feel of the poem. End rhyme in Silverstein's poems help his poems flow easier and smoother. This also helps make it easier or children to read. In this line from the poem, "And the dark street winds and bends," Silverstein uses personification to put emphasis and show how the street moves.
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