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Connections in Fahrenheit 451

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by

Martin Boden

on 13 February 2014

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Transcript of Connections in Fahrenheit 451

Fahrenheit 451:
Connections

Who?

What?

When?

Where?
Quote, Page Number
Why?
How are the texts connected?
Author
Title
Date of Publication
Country of Origin
Who?

What?

When?

Where?
Quote, Page Number
Author
Title
Date of Publication
Country of Origin
Picture of the Author?
Painting?
Who?

What?

When?

Where?
Quote, Page Number
Author
Title
Date of Publication
Country of Origin
Ray Bradbury

Dystopian Literature

1953

United States
Fahrenheit 451
Ovid

Daedalus and Icarus

8 AD

Rome
"Burned your wings"
p 113
Bastille

"Icarus"

2011

London, England
"Icarus is flying too close to the sun"
Refrain
Bastille uses Icarus to connect the theme of their song to ancient mythology and literature. Icarus is self destructive, but Bastille makes it appear as though his life is just beginning. TO ME, it's no surprise that this band celebrates self destruction. Fun did the same thing and made lots of money. Bastille's record label knows this.
Beatty compares Montag to Icarus, even though Icarus was stupid and reckless. If we look closely, it appears that the society is the real Icarus. The society as a whole worships stupidity and "flies too close to the sun." They get burned in the end. Beatty shows himself to be a hypocrite in this passage.
Herodotus

Histories

484-425 BC

Greece
“There was a silly damn bird called a Phoenix back before Christ, every few hundred years he built a pyre and
Daft Punk

"Get Lucky"

2013 AD

New York City
"It was the legend of the Phoenix"
- Beginning
Michael Ondaatje

The English Patient

1992

Canada
A character in this text is badly burned and his only possession is a copy of the histories of Herodotus.
The English Patient, Almasy, is a man who is bedridden by severe burns. One of his only possessions are the histories of Herodotus. On close examination, this man is pretty crispy from his burns. Maybe he is a phoenix...
The phoenix appears again in this recent song. Perhaps Daft Punk wants their fans to think they have risen from the ashes of obscurity into new popularity. Oddly enough, this was their single and their hit. Perhaps they are making a phoenix-like comeback.
William Shakespeare

Julius Caesar

1599 AD

London, England
"There is no terror, Cassius, in your threats, for I am arm'd so strong in honesty that they pass me as an idle wind, which I respect not!”"

John Green

The Fault in our Stars

2012 AD

United States
"the fault, dear Brutus, lies not in our stars, but in ourselves""

Here, Beatty quotes Brutus a he speaks to Montag. Brutus claims to have the truth on his side when he doesn't. Similarly, Beatty claims to have books on his side when he doesn't.
This line explains that it is not our stars or "fate" that causes us harm, but our actions. John Green's book says, "Yeah, but what about cancer?" The fault seems to be in our stars with this one...
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