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Symbolic Interactionism

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Jennifer White

on 18 February 2013

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Transcript of Symbolic Interactionism

Symbolic Interactionism
Communication Theory George Herbert Mead
1863-1931 George Herbert Mead- Philosophy professor at the University of Chicago
Theory first presented after his Mead’s death in 1931 in Mind, Self, and Society Symbolic Interactionism- Introduction Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.com
George Herbert Mead:
Son of a Congregational minister
Began to have self-doubts about his religiousity
Relationship between philosophy and religion
Studied Darwinism with Wilhelm Wundt, and G. Stanley Hall (two major founders of experimental psychology) Symbolic Interactionism- Biography George Herbert Mead
1863-1931 George Herbert Mead- Philosophy professor at the University of Chicago
Theory first presented after his Mead’s death in 1931 in Mind, Self, and Society Symbolic Interactionism- Introduction George Herbert Mead
1863-1931 George Herbert Mead- Philosophy professor at the University of Chicago
Theory first presented after his Mead’s death in 1931 in Mind, Self, and Society Symbolic Interactionism- Introduction George Herbert Mead
1863-1931 George Herbert Mead- Philosophy professor at the University of Chicago
Theory first presented after his Mead’s death in 1931 in Mind, Self, and Society Symbolic Interactionism- Introduction George Herbert Mead
1863-1931 George Herbert Mead- Philosophy professor at the University of Chicago
Theory first presented after his Mead’s death in 1931 in Mind, Self, and Society Symbolic Interactionism- Introduction Symbolic Interactionism- Critiqued Creating Reality
Erving Goffman- social interaction as social performance
Meaning-ful Research
Participant-observer
Generalized Other
Naming
Self-fulfilling Prophecy
Symbol Manipulation Symbolic Interactionism- Applied Generalized Other
The composite mental image a person has of his or her self based on community expectations and responses.
We take this position and assign meaning to ourselves and our actions. Symbolic Interactionism- Community and Self Language- the source of meaning
Default assumptions- there may use some basis in fact, but the subtle tyranny of symbols is that we usually don’t consciously think about the mental jump we are making. Symbolic Interactionism- Core Principles Language- the source of meaning
Meaning arises out of the social interaction that people have with each other.
Meaning is negotiated through the use of language.
Symbols-arbitrary signs- it is through interaction that we come to ascribe meaning and develop a universe of discourse.
Symbolic naming is the basis for human society.
The extent of knowing is dependent on the extent of naming.
My Fair Lady-Why Can’t the English? Symbolic Interactionism- Core Principles Blumer stated three core principles of SI:
Meaning
Language
Thought
Lead to conclusions about:
Self
Society Symbolic Interactionism- An Explanation Symbolic Interactionism- Chart RQ2: In response to this gen(d)eralized other, how do women from the community who work in the mines intersubjectively craft their own gender identities?
(a) I can be one of the guys.
(b) I’m not like other women.
(c) I can be feminine too. Symbolic Interactionism-Research Community RQ1: What are the community’s predominant discourses of gender, particularly as related to women working in the mining industry?
Male miners had “no problem” with women working in the mines…just as long as they can do their job
However (a) women are too weak to mine, (b) women are easy prey in the mines, and (c) the mines are no place for ladies. Symbolic Interactionism-Research Community In response, the women who do work in the mines—particularly the daughters of male miners—reflect upon this composite looking glass self and respond by crafting identities that both distance themselves from and link themselves to the community-constructed gen(d)eralized other. Symbolic Interactionism-Research Community Erving Goffman
1922-1982 1959Goffman’s The Presentation of Self in Everyday Life
Examined how people, with their words, positioned themselves to play out roles almost as if they were on a theatrical stage.
Extended SI by actually looking at interaction
In many of our communication textbooks today Symbolic Interactionism- Through the Years 1931 Two schools of thought formed
The Chicago School led by Blumer who published Mead’s work after his death and coined the term “Symbolic Interactionism.”
The Iowa school led by Manford Kuhn who worked to operationalize “sense of self.” Herbert Blumer
1900-1987 Symbolic Interactionism- Through the Years Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.com George Herbert Mead:
Son of a Congregational minister
Began to have self-doubts about his religiousity
Relationship between philosophy and religion
Studied Darwinism with Wilhelm Wundt, and G. Stanley Hall (two major founders of experimental psychology) Symbolic Interactionism- Biography Jennifer White
Communication Theory Symbolic Interactionism Looking glass self
The mental self-image that results from taking the role of the other; the objective self; me
“I” spontaneous, driving force that fosters all that is novel, unpredictable, and unorganized in the self.
versus
“Me” the objective self; the image of self seen when one takes the role of other.
I vs. Me Symbolic Interactionism- The Self: Reflections in a Looking Glass Thought- the process of taking the role of the other
An individual’s interpretation of symbols is modified by his or her own thought processes.
Minding- An inner dialogue used to test alternatives, rehearse actions, and anticipate reactions before responding self-talk.
Language is the software that activates the mind. Do you agree with this?
Taking the role of other- the process of mentally imagining that you are someone else who is viewing you. Symbolic Interactionism- Core Principles Meaning- the construction of social reality
Humans act toward people or things on the basis of the meanings they assign to those people or things
Once people define a situation as real, it is very real in its consequences.
Meaning making is a community project. Symbolic Interactionism- Core Principles Symbolic Interactionism- Chart Lucas, K.L. & Steimel, S.J. (2009). Creating and responding to the gen(d)eralized other: Women miners’ community- constructed identities. Women’s Studies in Communication, 32 (3), 320-347.
Purpose of study- gain insight into some of the complex experiences and identity negotiations of women in blue-collar work.
Using symbolic interactionism, they argue that the community at large (both male miners and their female partners)—create a highly generalized other that positions women as unfit for mining. Symbolic Interactionism-Research Community George Herbert Mead
1863-1931 George Herbert Mead- Philosophy professor at the University of Chicago
Theory first presented after his Mead’s death in 1931 in Mind, Self, and Society Symbolic Interactionism- Introduction Creating Reality
Erving Goffman- social interaction as social performance
Meaning-ful Research
Participant-observer
Generalized Other
Naming
Self-fulfilling Prophecy
Symbol Manipulation Symbolic Interactionism- Applied Looking glass self
The mental self-image that results from taking the role of the other; the objective self; me
“I” spontaneous, driving force that fosters all that is novel, unpredictable, and unorganized in the self.
versus
“Me” the objective self; the image of self seen when one takes the role of other. Symbolic Interactionism- The Self: Reflections in a Looking Glass Thought- the process of taking the role of the other
An individual’s interpretation of symbols is modified by his or her own thought processes.
Minding- An inner dialogue used to test alternatives, rehearse actions, and anticipate reactions before responding self-talk.
Language is the software that activates the mind. Do you agree with this?
Taking the role of other- the process of mentally imagining that you are someone else who is viewing you. Symbolic Interactionism- Core Principles Language- the source of meaning
Meaning arises out of the social interaction that people have with each other.
Meaning is negotiated through the use of language.
Symbols-arbitrary signs- it is through interaction that we come to ascribe meaning and develop a universe of discourse. Symbolic Interactionism- Core Principles Blumer stated three core principles of SI:
Meaning
Language
Thought
Lead to conclusions about:
Self
Society Symbolic Interactionism- An Explanation Symbolic Interactionism- Chart RQ2: In response to this gen(d)eralized other, how do women from the community who work in the mines intersubjectively craft their own gender identities?
(a) I can be one of the guys.
(b) I’m not like other women.
(c) I can be feminine too. Symbolic Interactionism-Research Community Symbolic Interactionism-Research Community 1931 Two schools of thought formed

The Chicago School led by Blumer who published Mead’s work after his death and coined the term “Symbolic Interactionism.”
The Iowa school led by Manford Kuhn who worked to operationalize “sense of self.” Herbert Blumer
1900-1987 Symbolic Interactionism- Through the Years George Herbert Mead
1863-1931 George Herbert Mead- Philosophy professor at the University of Chicago
Theory first presented after his Mead’s death in 1931 in Mind, Self, and Society Symbolic Interactionism- Introduction Jennifer White
Communication Theory Symbolic Interactionism Symbolic Interactionism- Critiqued Generalized Other
The composite mental image a person has of his or her self based on community expectations and responses.
We take this position and assign meaning to ourselves and our actions. Symbolic Interactionism- Community and Self Meaning- the construction of social reality
Humans act toward people or things on the basis of the meanings they assign to those people or things
Once people define a situation as real, it is very real in its consequences.
Meaning making is a community project. Symbolic Interactionism- Core Principles Symbolic Interactionism- Chart RQ1: What are the community’s predominant discourses of gender, particularly as related to women working in the mining industry?
Male miners had “no problem” with women working in the mines…just as long as they can do their job
However (a) women are too weak to mine, (b) women are easy prey in the mines, and (c) the mines are no place for ladies. Symbolic Interactionism-Research Community Erving Goffman
1922-1982 1959-- Goffman’s The Presentation of Self in Everyday Life Examined how people, with their words, positioned themselves to play out roles almost as if they were on a theatrical stage.
Extended SI by actually looking at interaction
In many of our communication textbooks today Symbolic Interactionism- Through the Years Language- the source of meaning
Default assumptions
Subtle tyranny of symbols Symbolic Interactionism- Core Principles Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.com George Herbert Mead:
Son of a Congregational minister
Began to have self-doubts about his religiousity
Relationship between philosophy and religion
Studied Darwinism with Wilhelm Wundt, and G. Stanley Hall (two major founders of experimental psychology) Symbolic Interactionism- Biography "British Journal of Learning Disabilities"
"Informatics for Health & Social Care"
"Community, Work, & Family" Symbolic Interactionism- Core Principles Symbolic naming is the basis for human society.
The extent of knowing is dependent on the extent of naming.
My Fair Lady-Why Can’t the English?
Full transcript