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Quality feedback

Giving advice on how to give feedback after lesson observations
by

Alexandra Gray

on 19 January 2016

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Transcript of Quality feedback

High Quality Lesson
Observation Feedback

When observing lessons consider...
Staff have consistently high expectations and ensure work is challenging enough for all pupils and meets their
individual needs
Pupils' responses demonstrate sufficient gains in their knowledge, skills and understanding, including in literacy and mathematics
Teachers monitor pupils' progress in lessons and use assessment information well to adapt their planning and teaching
Teachers use questioning and discussion to assess the effectiveness of their teaching and promote pupils' learning
Teachers have relevant subject knowledge that is detailed and communicated well to pupils
Pupils understand well how to improve their work as result of useful feedback 
 Pupils love the challenge of learning and are resilient to failure
Scrutiny of pupils' work, with particular attention given to:
How well and frequently marking, assessment and testing are used to help teachers improve pupils' learning.

The level of challenge provided

Pupils' effort and success in completing their work and the progress they make over a period of time.
How does this criteria fit into the observation form?
Rationale
1. To support high quality feedback is given to all colleagues following an observation.

2. To celebrate and re-enforce high quality teaching and opportunities for learning.

3.Provide key areas for improvement or development and exploration.

4. Ensure verbal feedback is directly in tune with the Judgement reached.
When inspectors observe teaching, they observe pupils' learning.
Planning and Differentiation
Progress
Assessment
Teaching
Use this language when giving the feedback.
Observing learning over time.
When inspectors observe teaching they observe pupils' learning.
These are your key indicators for Judgement.
Common pitfalls
Is the work challenging enough?
Ask the pupils if you are not sure -
"Is this work too easy?"
"Do you find this work a challenge?"
When observing 'questioning and discussion', make sure teachers assess the effectiveness of their teaching to promote pupils' learning.
Highlight - reshape task.
Make a note of the pupils you talk to - choose them from the information given to you by the teacher. Write down who they were (as evidence).
Common pitfalls
Writing a commentary of what happens in the lesson.
(Story of the lesson.)
When writing down feedback during an observation, always think about the IMPACT.
E.g. What do you see? What is the impact of what you see?
Try to write your observations in a list of statements. (Reverse of ob. sheet to help)
When you think about the IMPACT,
this will help you decide
the judgement
of the lesson.
Unclear notes
Think about how you write your notes from the observation;
Avoid statements such as "Questioning wasn't good enough" - this makes giving feedback difficult.
Ice breaker
"How do you think the lesson went?" - They might say "Brilliantly" and your feedback might contradict this!
Alternatives to try:
"Pick one thing that you felt went very well."
"With the power of hindsight, if anything, what might you do differently if you were to teach the lesson again?
Be careful with the language that you use when giving verbal feedback.
Avoid using judgement words e.g. "
Good
use of questioning and
outstanding
relationships with the students"
The teacher might focus on those words and that may not be the overall judgement of the lesson!
Failing to depersonalise
Although you may not be saying that the teacher is inadequate, this may be what they hear.
Better to say "In the part of the lesson that I saw, the quality of teaching was inadequate, because...."
OBSERVE
EVIDENCE BASE
ASSESS IMPACT
DECIDE JUDGEMENT
FEEDBACK
IMPACT
EVIDENCE BASE
OBSERVE
Ask yourself "How much learning am I seeing?"
Look for systematic AfL - Observe - "How are they checking?"
Is the depth of questioning aiding the pupils in learning knowledge?
What is causing rapid progress? OR What is stopping it?
You are now going to watch a video.
Feel free to use these if they are your judgement!
Focus on evidence - this stops the teacher 'challenging' your judgements.
Make a record of the students you spoke to and what they said.
If an activity is going well - evidence?
If an activity is not going well - evidence?
Keep referring back to the pupils - "What evidence is there that the pupils understood the plenary? "
When you think about the impact, this will help to decide the judgement of the lesson.
Try to make every sentence two parts; DESCRIPTION followed by IMPACT on LEARNING
Always refer back to the evidence if a teacher disagrees with your comments and judgements. Keep referring to the IMPACT in the lesson.
JUDGEMENT & FEEDBACK
Decide your judgement, making sure you have the evidence to support this.
If the lesson is good - make sure you have something to say on how to make it outstanding.
Only give 2 or 3 things for improvement (key things). Try to soften the blow! There should be some positives to comment on!
Look at the beginning of the book - then look at the end.
Has the work improved?
Are they picking up the teacher feedback?
How often are the books marked?
Complete the tick sheet for each section.
Based on the feedback - What is the grade of the lesson?
Final thought
If the grading you are about to give is "Inadequate" or "Outstanding" - Say this early on - before breaking down the feedback.
Staff have consistently high expectations and ensure work is challenging enough for all pupils and meets their individual needs
Pupils' responses demonstrate sufficient gains in their knowledge, skills and understanding, including in literacy and mathematics
Teachers monitor pupils' progress in lessons and use assessment information well to adapt their planning and teaching
Teachers use questioning and discussion to assess the effectiveness of their teaching and promote pupils' learning
Teachers have relevant subject knowledge that is detailed and communicated well to pupils

Pupils understand well how to improve their work as result of useful feedback

 Pupils love the challenge of learning and are resilient to failure
Subject knowledge
Progress over time
Teaching
Full transcript