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Rhodopis: The First "Cinderella"

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by

Deidre Mays

on 31 May 2014

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Transcript of Rhodopis: The First "Cinderella"

Charles Perrault
The Grimm Brothers
Cendrillion
Rhodopis: The First "Cinderella"
Into the Woods
Bringing "Cinderella" into the New Millennium
The Men Get Involved
Woman are doing it for themselves
CinderFella
First recorded by the Greek historian Strabo in the 1st century B.C., Rhodopis is considered to be the first known "Cinderella" story. A brief summary of the tale: While Rhodopis, a slave girl, bathes in the river a falcon swoops down and steals one of her golden slippers. The falcon then drops it in the lap of the Pharaoh who in turn decrees that he will wed the lady whose foot fits the delicate slipper. His search leads him to Rhodopis and they are wed.
Rhodopis, an Egyptian Cinderella
One of the best known versions of the "Cinderella" story was written by Charles Perrault in 1697. Originally titled "Cendrillion", this version included the addition of the pumpkin, the fairy-godmother, and introduces the glass slipper we are all familiar with.
The Traditional Cinderella Story
The Grimm Brother's version, written in the 19th century, takes on a much darker tone. Known as "Ashenputtel", she receives help from the birds that nest in the tree she planted at her mother's grave. They provide her the gown and golden slippers she wears to the ball and inform the Prince of the step-sisters trickery when they cut off their toes and heal to fit into the slipper. The birds also pluck their eyes out as punishment for their treachery.
A Grimm Version
Cendrillion
, directed by George Melies and released in 1899, is the first filmed version of the "Cinderella" story.
Cendrillion
"Cinderella" thru the Ages
Cinderella on Broadway
A post-feminist take on the "Cinderella" story, stars Drew Barrymore in the main role. This retelling is a more realistic approach with a modern twist. The heroine saves herself in the end and gets her happy ending.
Ever After
Broadway has seen several incarnations of Cinderella. Here are a few scenes from "Into the Woods", a musical by Stephen Sondheim and James Lapine. The plot weaves several of the Grimm fairy-tales into a cohesive tale. The first act tells the story of how they get to their "Happily Ever After", while the second act focuses on what happens after the story ends.
Staring Jerry Lewis in the title role, this gender bending comedic farce is a refreshing retelling of a classic tale.
Cinderfella
A short film by Todrick Hall for his YouTube channel, this retelling of Cinderella is told thru songs by the artist Beyonce.
Cinderonce
Todrick Hall also developed his own version of Cinderfella. Mixing current music and original lyrics with spoken word, this verson finds CinderFella the love of his life...Prince Charming.
The Guys Get Their Happy Ending Too!
Throughout the centuries the story of Cinderella has changed and adapted to the current sentiment of the time. In the beginning, the slave or servant girl was rewarded for her goodness with a husband of wealth and power. Now, the roles are being reversed putting women in power or earning that power for themselves. The feminist movement is apparent in the more current versions of Cinderella. But the tale is ever evolving; even now the gay movement is beginning to influence that tale. Who knows what the future will bring for this classic story.
Conclusion
Full transcript