Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

THE BODY SYSTEMS

No description
by

John Mullaney

on 17 November 2016

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of THE BODY SYSTEMS

THE BODY SYSTEMS
THE BODY SYSTEMS
NERVOUS SYSTEM
The nervous system is a very complex system in the body. It has many, many parts, but there are 3 we will focus on; The Brain, Spinal Cord, and Nerves.

CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
HEART
BLOOD
BLOOD VESSELS
THE NERVOUS SYSTEM
LUNGS
MOUTH
NOSE
TRACHEA (WINDPIPE)
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
RESPIRATORY SYSTEM
BRAIN
SPINAL CORD
NERVES
MUSCLES
TENDONS
MUSCULAR SYSTEM
DIGESTIVE SYSTEM
MOUTH
ESOPHAGUS
STOMACH
INTESTINES
SKELETAL SYSTEM
BONES
Your heart pumps blood through blood vessels to all the parts of your body.

Your blood has oxygen in it. When blood travels through your body, it delivers oxygen and nutrients to your body parts.

On its way back to the heart, your blood picks up waste so that your body can get rid of the things it doesn't need.
Your circulatory system is a little like the pizza delivery guy because it delivers the things your body needs; and like a garbage truck because it picks up and takes away things you don't need.
What is a circulatory system?
How does it work?
How does oxygen get into my blood?
Take a deep breath. Where does that air you breath in go? That's right, into your lungs, but that's not the end! Your heart pumps blood into your lungs and the blood mixes with the oxygen you just breathed.

After your blood picks up oxygen, it goes back into your heart. Then your heart sends it through your arteries so that oxygen is delivered to all the cells in your entire body.

The blood cells also pick up waste (stuff our body doesn't need), like carbon dioxide, and brings it back to your lungs so that you can exhale (breath it out) to get rid of it.
CIRCULATORY SYSTEM (CONT.)
Blood is made of different kinds of cells. The 3 main cells are red blood cells, white blood cells and platelets.







What is blood?
http://www.hhmi.org/biointeractive/heart-function
DIGESTIVE SYSTEM
You know that a car needs fuel to make it run, your body is like your car because it needs fuel too. Your fuel is food. Your body makes chemical changes to the food so that it turns into energy for you
TEETH
Can you swallow a whole apple? No way, it won't fit! You have to make it smaller so that it will fit into your mouth. How do you do that?
Your teeth are like little chopping machines. They chop and grind your food into little pieces so that they can be swallowed. Saliva makes it mushy so that it's easier to swallow. Where does it go next....?

ESOPHAGUS
The esophagus is a tube about 10 inches long that connects your mouth to your stomach. The esophagus has muscles that squeeze the food, like when you squeeze toothpaste out of the tube. It moves the food slowly into the stomach.

Your mouth is part of your head, and your stomach is in the middle of your body. So how does food get from your mouth all the way down to your stomach?
STOMACH
Did you know that food spends 2 or 3 hours in your stomach? It doesn't just sit there, your stomach is busy mixing the chunks of food you swallowed with acids that turn it into a milkshake like mixture.
SMALL INTESTINE
After your stomach is done making a mushy milkshake like mixture of your food, it goes to the small intestine. The small intestine has the important job of breaking down the food mixture so your body can absorb all the nutrients it needs from food - vitamins, minerals, proteins, carbohydrates, and fats. Your small intestine is 22 feet long!
Anything that cannot be absorbed into your body goes to the final part of the journey, the large intestine. The large intestine is fatter than the small intestine and its job is to move all the things your body doesn't need out of your body. It holds all the waste until you are ready to go to the bathroom.
LARGE INTESTINE
SKELETAL SYSTEM
THE FUNCTION OF THE SKELETAL SYSTEM IS TO:
SUPPORT THE BODY
GIVE THE BODY SHAPE
WORK WITH THE MUSCLES TO MOVE THE BODY
PROTECTION
MUSCULAR SYSTEM
HELPS TO SUPPORT AND MOVE THE BODY
Did you know you have more than 600 muscles in your body? They do everything from pumping blood throughout your body to helping you lift
your heavy backpack. You control some of your muscles, while others — like your heart —
do their jobs without you thinking about them at all.


Muscles are all made of the same material, a type of elastic tissue (sort of like the material in a rubber band). Thousands, or even tens of thousands, of small fibers make up each muscle.


You have three different types of muscles in your body: smooth muscle, cardiac (say: KAR-dee-ak) muscle, and skeletal (say: SKEL-uh-tul) muscle.



Smooth muscles — sometimes also called involuntary muscles — are usually in sheets, or layers, with one layer of muscle behind the other.

The muscle that makes up the heart is called cardiac muscle.
Together, the skeletal muscles work with your bones to give your body power and strength. In most cases, a skeletal muscle is attached to one end of a bone. It stretches all the way across a joint (the place where two bones meet) and then attaches again to another bone.


RESPIRATORY SYSTEM
NOSE
Before air enters the body, the nose filters it to remove dirt and warms it up so that its an appropriate temperature.
PHARYNX
The throat (pharynx) is a muscular tube
that carries the air down into the windpipe and also carries food down to the gullet.
EPIGLOTTIS
The epiglottis is a leaf shaped piece of cartilage that covers the top of the voice box (larynx) during swallowing.

It keeps the food out of the lungs and voice box.
LARYNX
The voice box sits on the
top of the windpipe.

It has a backbone of cartilage that you can feel at the front of your throat. This is known as the Adam's apple and is more promonent in men than women.
TRACHEA
The trachea or windpipe takes air from the Larynx to the lungs. It has ribs of cartilage to keep it open.
BRONCHIAL TREE
The bronchi or airways take the air to the bottom of the lungs.

The airways are called a bronchial tree because they look like the roots of a tree.
THE LUNGS
The lungs, thousands of tiny sacs called aveoli extend from the end of the smallest airways (bronchioles). They look like a bit like bunches of grapes hanging off a stem.

The left and right lungs are about the same size, except the left lung has an indentation at the bottom to allow room for the heart.
ALVEOLI
Oxygen enters your bloodstream through a process called respiration. The walls of the alveoli (air sacs) are thin, allowing oxygen from the inhaled air to pass through where it's picked up by passing red blood cells..
The brain is the most important part of our anatomy. It tells all the other parts what to do, and when to do it.

The brain works as part of a network that includes the spinal cord and peripheral nerves. Together, they transmit and control any information sent to and from the other areas of the body.

The brain is the master controller.
THE BRAIN

Special types of cells called neurons, or nerve cells, make up the content of the brain. These cells form a network throughout the body as well.

The brain uses this network to send messages and receive feedback from the body using electrochemical charges. As such, neurons send messages to each other through the spinal cord and peripheral nerves.

It's the electrochemical aspect of neurons that allows the brain to coordinate all the body's functions.
BRAIN CONTINUED
THE
SPINAL CORD
The spinal cord is a length of tissue that extends from the brain to about the belt line through the backbone or vertebrae.

It contains nerves that carry signals to and from the brain to control voluntary movement (like moving limbs) and sensation (like feeling a pinprick).

It is sort of an “information superhighway” for the body carrying billions of messages back and forth from the brain.
You have heard of your five senses: smell, taste, sight, hearing, touch.

It is the sensory nerves that take the messages received from your environment and relay the information to your brain. Without those sensory nerves, you would not have any of the five senses.
SENSORY NERVES
MOTOR NERVES
The motor nerves carry a message from your brain telling you to move your bones and muscles. You would never get anywhere without them.

Red blood cells have 2 jobs, delivery like a pizza guy, and collect waste like the garbage man.

1. Red blood cells deliver nutrients and oxygen to your cells.
Platelets help your body repair itself when you get hurt. They cause your blood to clot so that you stop bleeding when you get a cut. If you had no platelets you would bleed to death if you got a cut or scraped your knee.
White blood cells are like your
own personal germ fighting army.
They fight germs and bacteria
and sometimes eat them. They help
prevent you from getting sick.
2. Red blood cells carry carbon
dioxide from your cells to your
lungs.
35 secconds MR. MULLANEY!!!!!
Full transcript