Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Critical Thinking

Introduce your new ideas and show what's on your mind with this animated Prezi. Download this template from Pezibase.com
by

Laura Hancock

on 1 November 2016

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Critical Thinking

and
Critical
Thinking
Close REading
Download this Prezi template from:
http://prezibase.com
Laura Hancock
ED 420
Dr. Dreyer
April 24, 2014
1. Define critical thinking

2. Short history of critical thinking

3. Elements of critical thinking

4. Why close reading to support the development of critical thinking
e
f
g
h
J
k
ideas!
innovation
business
m
7
Critical thinking is the intellectually
disciplined

process

of
actively
and
skillfully

conceptualizing
,
applying
,
analyzing
,
synthesizing
, and/or
evaluating

information
gathered from, or generated by,
observation
,
experience
,
reflection
,
reasoning
, or
communication
, as a
guide to belief and action
.

(Scriven & Paul 1987)
Use of
cognitive skills
&
abilities
that increase the probability of a desirable outcome.

Purposeful
,
reasoned
, and
goal directed
.

Solve problems, formulate inferences, calculate likelihoods,
& make decisions.

Use appropriately, without prompting, and usually with
conscious
intent.

Evaluating
the
outcomes
of our
thought processes
-how good a decision is or how well a problem is solved.
(Halpern, 1999)
Use icons?
Critical - Greek word "Kritike"
The art of judgement.
Overview
Dispositions
Ability
Attitudes
Intellectual Virtues
Habits of Mind
Mindfulness
18th Century
Renaissance
Scientific Revolution
Digital Age
French
Enlightenment
Middle Ages
Ancient Greek
(Classical)
15th & 16th Centuries
European scholars began thinking critically about art, history, nature,
law, freedom and society

17th Century
Sir Isaac Newton
1642-1727
Mathematics, gravity & optics
The mind when disciplined by reason is better able to support the social and political world.

Valued disciplined intellectual exchange.

“The unexamined life is not worth living.”
Set an agenda or purpose
Reflectively question beliefs & explanations
Justify claims
Seek evidence
Closely examines reason & assumptions
Not to blindly believe people in authority
Clarity and logic
Socratic Questioning
Socrates
469-399 B.C.
Plato
429–347 B.C.
Aristotle
384–322 B.C.

Systematic & Cross-Examined.

Do not always reject established beliefs, only those that lack reasoned foundations.

Thomas Acquinas
1225 -1274
Understand deeper realities of life and think systematically.

Thinking should be comprehensive, well reasoned and responsive to objections.
The way we misuse our minds in seeking knowledge.
The Advantage of Learning
.
Modern science - to study the world empirically.
When people are left to their own devices they develop bad habits.
IDOLS of schools, market place, theater and TRIBE.

Sir Francis Bacon
1561-1626

Rules for the Direction of the Mind
Early modern epistemology
Developed Principle of Systematic Doubt
Mind-Body Dualism
Thinking for clarity and precision
Two powers of the mind: the intellect and the will.

Francis Descartes
1596 - 1690
John Locke
Critical mind to open platform to new learning
Sir Thomas Moore
Utopia
critiquing social systems
Niccoli Machiaelli
The Prince
Critiquing politics
Not egocentric views but gathering evidence and sound reasoning.
Robert Boyle
1627-1691
Experimental knowledge
Chemist
Bayle
Voltaire
Montesquieu
Diderot
Wealth of Nations
1776
Critiquing economics
Declarations of independence
1776
Critiquing loyalty to the King
Critique of Pure Reason
1781
Critiquing reason
Critical Thought
Social life
Sociology
Auguste Comte
1798-1857
Herbert Spencer
1820 - 1903
Charles Darwin
1809 – 1882
Cultural & Biological Life
Anthropology
Linguistics
Sigmund Freud
1856 -1939
Psychoanalysis
Human nature
Technological advancement
New literacies
Vast amounts of information at our fingertips


21st Century
20th Century
Power and nature of critical thinking is more explicit formulation.
William Graham Sumner
1840-1910
Folkways
John Dewy
1859- 1952
Mind thinks sociocentrically & schools parallel this social indoctrination.
Contemporary critical thinking
How We Think.
Democracy and Education,
Inquiry, reflective thinking
Jean Piaget
1896-1980
Ludwig Wittgenstein
1889-1951
Philosophy
Linguistics Turn
Egocentric
Sociocentric
thought
Psychology – mind is easily deceived
Hard sciences – power of information, empirical studies
Domain specific inquiry
Power of critical thought & the use of tools for critical thought.
19th Century
20th Century
Whys
Whynots

Cans
Cannots
Hows
Hownots
Whatifs
Anchor Standards

1. Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly
and to make logical inferences from it: cite specific
textual evidence when writing or speaking to support
conclusions drawn from the text.


10. Read and comprehend complex literacy and informational
texts independently and proficiently.
CCSS 2012
Analyze
Conceptualize
Define
Examine
Infer
Listen
Question
Reason
Synthesize
analyze
infer
conceptualize
examine
listen
question
reason
synthesize
evaluate information
}
+
evaluate own thought
Critical Thinking
Disciplined
Refine thought process
Thinking is comprehensive
Identify bias, prejudice & propaganda
https://www.youtube.com/user/QualiaSoup
http://www.mentoringminds.com/developing-21st-century-critical-thinkers-poster
Close Reading involves investigating a short piece of text multiple times over multiple lessons. Through test-based
questions, discussion, students are guided to deeply analyze and appreciate various aspects of the texts
, such as
key vocabulary
and how its
meaning is shaped by context
: attention to form tone, imagery, and /or rhetorical device: the significance of word choice and syntax and the discovery of different levels of meanings as passages are read multiple times. (p.2)
(Brown & Kappas, 2012)
Salient Features of Close Reading Instruction
Multiple Readings
Annotation
Collaboration
Text-dependent questions
Full transcript