Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Wicked Problem

No description
by

Brittany Smith

on 5 May 2018

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Wicked Problem

Guided Question 1
Guided Question 2
What could be possible reasons that Australia’s waste management plan is not as sustainable as it has been in the past?
Guided Question 3
Where does the majority of Australia's waste go if it does not end up in landfill and what are the implications on the environment and the future?
Question 4
How sustainable is Australia’s waste management in comparison to other countries?
Wicked Problem
Guided Questions
Critical Reflection
Generic Primary and Secondary Sources
Specific Primary and Secondary Sources
Further Actions
Generic Primary and Secondary Sources
Generic Primary and Secondary Sources
Specific Primary and Secondary Sources
Further Actions
Specific Primary and Secondary Sources
Further Actions
Specific Primary and Secondary Sources
Generic Primary and Secondary Sources
Further Actions
The following guided questions have been designed to clearly demonstrate personal learning, findings and recommendations for further action regarding the wicked problem of the sustainability of Australia's waste management for future generations.
Prior Knowledge
My prior knowledge about the sustainability of waste management in Australia is generic, however, as far as I am aware, our waste management system in Australia is not sustainable long-term. Last year I visited a waste management plant with a group of students through my current employment which opened my eyes to the important role each citizen plays in ensuring waste management is sustainable for future generations. From this experience it was clear that if every person was aware of the correct procedures of recycling and composted food scraps in their own homes, the current waste management systems in Australia would be more sustainable. However, as the vast majority of Australians are unaware of the correct measures to control waste management, our current process will not be sustainable long-term.
Prior Knowledge
Prior Knowledge
Prior Knowledge
The generic primary and secondary sources that would be beneficial to explore and further my understanding of this inquiry question regarding waste management would include newspaper articles/reports, interviews, legislation/regulations, government documents, books, journal articles, news reports and educational videos regarding this topic. These sources can be effectively used to explore and enhance understanding of the sustainability of waste management in Australia using an inquiry process to explore and further understanding of this wicked problem.
Primary Sources
Australian Waste Management Website
This primary source explores and furthers my understanding of the process of waste management in Australia and offers suggestions and recommendations on how to be more sustainable in individual homes.
https://www.australianwastemanagement.com.au/


Waste Programs for Schools
The links below offer information and booking forms to visit waste management and landfill centers. Engaging with such primary sources would further my understanding of the sustainability of Australia's current waste management process.
https://docs.google.com/document/d/15eYkeXUj2UegLFucq9v4lROofAC0dxshXlBaod2EPXk/edit?usp=sharing
https://docs.google.com/document/d/1duS3mt3xGS5-xQmtQRXo042LGz9ao7fINZvgQ2p-_lc/edit?usp=sharing
Secondary Sources
25 Educational Resources to Help Kids with the War on Waste
http://education.abc.net.au/newsandarticles/blog/-/b/2535555/25-educational-resources-to-help-kids-with-the-war-on-waste
This secondary source provides 25 educational resources to explore if Australia's waste management plan is sustainable long-term and how society can be more sustainable in managing waste; further developing my understanding of Australia's waste management practices.

Let's Face It - Recycling is Just a Load of Old Rubbish (Newspaper Article)
https://docs.google.com/document/d/1m3cKNUYOBLQaRhAG1X3iyKSa8LNQiltjAYjeOiEZ_JU/edit?usp=sharing
This article discusses how Australia's waste management is not simple or sustainable long term, furthering my understanding of Australia's current waste management processes.
The above primary and secondary sources will support, explore and expose the key inquiry issue of the sustainability of waste management in Australia to enhance and further my personal understanding of this wicked problem.
References
The primary and secondary sources provided have exposed flaws in Australia’s current waste management processes indicating that it is not sustainable long-term. However, these sources also provided solutions to ensure waste management will be more sustainable for future generations. Therefore, it is recommended to engage with the primary and secondary sources within this graphic organiser to take action to resolve this issue. Key actions to take include:
Implement compost systems in personal households
Understanding which products (or parts of products) can and cannot be recycled
Purchase reusable products to limit waste (e.g. shopping bags, coffee cups, water bottles)
Contacting local council to promote education of sustainable waste management within local communities.
If these actions are taken, this will promote a more sustainable approach to waste management and ensure a brighter future for Australia.
Is Australia's Waste Management Sustainable?
Is Australia's current process for managing waste sustainable?
Primary Sources
Secondary Sources
Primary Sources
Secondary Sources
Primary Sources
Secondary Sources
My prior knowledge about the possible reasons why Australia’s waste management plan is not as sustainable as it has been in the past is sufficient due to my current employment and personal interests. Humans are more disposable in their lives today than ever before, with Australia’s waste management plan struggling to keep up with the production, use and disposability use of single use plastics (World Economic Forum, 2018; Commonwealth of Australia, 2018). Australia’s waste management plan is not as sustainable as it has been in the past due to the rapid increase in production of disposable products and increase in population (Commonwealth of Australia, 2018). If Australia does not limit disposable waste production and citizens are not informed and conscious of living sustainably, current waste management practices will not be sustainable for future generations (Commonwealth of Australia, 2018).
The generic primary and secondary sources that would be beneficial to explore and further my understanding of this inquiry question regarding waste management would include newspaper articles/reports, interviews, legislation/regulations, government documents, waste management and landfill centers, books, journal articles, news reports and and educational videos regarding this topic. These sources can be effectively used to explore and enhance understanding of the sustainability of waste management in Australia using an inquiry process to explore and further understanding of this wicked problem.

The above primary and secondary sources will support, explore and expose the key inquiry issue of the sustainability of waste management in Australia to enhance and further my personal understanding of this wicked problem.
The above primary and secondary sources will support, explore and expose the key inquiry issue of the sustainability of waste management in Australia to enhance and further my personal understanding of this wicked problem.
The above primary and secondary sources will support, explore and expose the key inquiry issue of the sustainability of waste management in Australia to enhance and further my personal understanding of this wicked problem.

It is not simply the responsibility of the Australian Government to ensure waste management is sustainable for future generations, rather it is the responsibility of each individual citizen of Australia. Waste management plans and support is necessary from the Australian Government, however, if citizens do not take responsibility for living more sustainably, considering Catholic Social Teaching Principle Stewardship of Creation, Australia is likely to develop into a dumping ground. It is for this reason that the following actions must be taken:
Ban the use of single use plastic bags across all states in Australia (New South Wales only state where they are not banned).
Explore new avenues in turning waste into fuel - following other countries examples to strive towards a zero landfill future
Write to council to demand better training and awareness for what Australian citizens can be doing in their households to ensure a sustainable future is maintained for the future.
If these actions are taken, this will promote a more sustainable approach to waste management and ensure a brighter future for Australia.
I have a thorough understanding of where waste goes if it is not correctly and sustainably disposed of and the implications this will have on the environment and our future. With approximately 80% of the oceans rubbish coming directly from the land, research estimates that there will be more plastic than fish in our oceans by the year 2050 (World Economic Forum, 2018). These shocking and confronting statistics confirm that a large portion of waste extends to the ocean if it is not correctly and sustainably disposed of. As seafood is a large source of food for Australia, if waste is not sustainably managed, this will directly affect Australia’s food supply as it will cause species to decline or affect the quality of seafood. In addition, the environmental implications for insufficient waste management programs are immense, affecting not marine life, but other environmental aspects and future generations.
The generic primary and secondary sources that would be beneficial to explore and further my understanding of this inquiry question regarding waste management would include newspaper articles/reports, interviews, legislation/regulations, government documents, waste management plants, community resources, books, journal articles, news reports and educational videos regarding this topic. These sources can be effectively used to explore and enhance understanding of the sustainability of waste management in Australia using an inquiry process to explore and further understanding of this wicked problem.
SEA LIFE Sunshine Coast
Engaging with this community resource will further my understanding of this guided question as it strives to educate the public on their responsibility in managing waste in Australia by dedicating a tank to replicate the Great Pacific Garbage Patch and other conservation messages to create active and involved citizens. Education is the key to ensuring Australia's waste is correctly disposed of, establishing a sense of responsibility in citizens, resulting in a more sustainable future for Australia.
Plastic Waste Inputs From Land into the Ocean Article
http://science.sciencemag.org/content/347/6223/768.full
This secondary source identifies Australia's waste management, past and present, presenting concerns of an unsustainable future; furthering my understanding of this topic.

Public Awareness, Concerns and Priorities About Anthropogenic Impacts on Marine Environments
http://www.pnas.org/content/111/42/15042
This report analyses over 10,000 responses to the negative impact humans are having on marine life, furthering understanding regarding this guided question.

Plastic Oceans
https://plasticoceans.org/
This excellent secondary source provides numerous resources and evidence to further understanding about the implications of poor waste management procedures including links, videos, media contacts, relevant, newspaper articles, research based evidence and how the public can get involved to take action.

Impacts of Plastic Debris on Australian Marine Life
http://www.environment.gov.au/system/files/resources/0b16bb3c-59c3-4af9-b047-f29b735e65b2/files/marine-debris-cr-consulting.pdf
This confronting Australian Government document furthered my understanding of the dramatic implications Australia's waste is having on marine life.
Big Australia's Rubbish Future Does Not Have to go to Waste Article
http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-03-17/waste-could-become-fuel-source-in-big-australias-future/9550082
This article compares Australia current waste management to Sweden and America and provides solutions/recommendations to improve Australia's current waste management system to create a more sustainable future generations.

Explainer: Why We Should Be Turning Waste Into Fuel
http://theconversation.com/explainer-why-we-should-be-turning-waste-into-fuel-77463
This Newspaper article suggests that Australia's waste management plan is not as sustainable as other countries who are innoavting new practices to turn waste into fuel; furthering my understanding of this guided question.

Australia: State of the Environment Document
https://soe.environment.gov.au/theme/built-environment/topic/2016/increased-pollution
This document provides insight into possible reasons for increased pollution in Australia including increased population, aging population, urbanisation and increased transport.
Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority. (2018).
Year 4 HASS.
Retrieved from https://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/f-10-curriculum/humanities-and-social-sciences/hass/
Browett, J., & Ashman, G. (2008).
Thinking globally: Global perspectives in the early years classroom.
Carlton South, Australia: Education Services Australia.
Caritas Australia. (2018).
Our values: Catholic social teaching.
Retrieved from http://www.caritas.org.au/about/catholic-social-teaching-values
Commonwealth of Australia. (2018).
National waste policy.
Retrieved from http://www.environment.gov.au/protection/national-waste-policy
Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011).
Teaching society and environment. (4th ed.).
Cengage Learning: South Melbourne.
Gilbert, R. (2012).
Studying society and environment.
Melbourne: Macmillan Education.
Marsh, C., & Hart, C. (2011).
Teaching the social sciences and humanities in an Australian curriculum.
(6th ed.). Frenchs Forest, NSW: Pearson Australia.
Nayler, J. (2014). Enacting Australian Curriculum:
Making connections for quality learning.
Retrieved from https://www.qcaa.qld.edu.au/downloads/p_10/ac_enact_ac_paper.pdf
Reynolds, R. (2014).
Teaching Humanities and Social Sciences in the primary school. (3rd ed.).
Oxford: Sydney.
Wiggins, G., & McTighe, J. (2011).
Understanding by design guide to creating high-quality units.
Retrieved from https://ebookcentral-proquest-com.ezproxy1.acu.edu.au
World Economic Forum. (2018).
The new plastics economy: Rethinking the future of plastics.
Retrieved from https://www.weforum.org/reports/the-new-plastics-economy-rethinking-the-future-of-plastics
My prior knowledge about the sustainability of Australia’s waste management in comparison to other countries is equivocal, however, recognise that Australia is not leading the world in sustainability of waste management. Although Australia offers facilities to sustainably manage waste, a large portion of Australians are not aware of the correct measures to take to promote sustainability in their own homes. Personally travelling to over 30 countries has exposed that citizens of other countries are more accountable in their roles towards a sustainable future in relation to waste management.
The generic primary and secondary sources that would be beneficial to explore and further my understanding of this inquiry question regarding waste management would include newspaper articles/reports, interviews, legislation/regulations, government documents, skype conferences with surrounding countries, waste management plants, community resources, books, journal articles, news reports and educational videos regarding this topic. These sources can be effectively used to explore and enhance understanding of the sustainability of waste management in Australia using an inquiry process to explore and further understanding of this wicked problem.

It is important for countries to work collaboratively and learn from other’s experiences, ideas and practices to continually develop towards a positive and sustainable future. Therefore, as the primary and secondary sources revealed, there is a great deal Australia can learn from other countries to ensure the management of waste is sustainable for future generations. The following recommendations will promote a more sustainable future for Australia’s waste management if they are actioned:
Follow examples and practices implemented by European countries (particularity Sweden) that are ensuring a more sustainable future for their country (e.g. converting waste into fuel, recycling practices etc.).
Provide each household in Australia with a compost bin to promote composting food scraps to reduce waste.
Provide incentives for companies and large corporations to promote a zero waste workplace.
If these actions are taken, this will promote a more sustainable approach to waste management and ensure a brighter future for Australia.
It is evident that citizens of Australia are not conscious of the impacts incorrectly disposing waste has on the environment. Therefore, actions must be taken to ensure Australia’s waste can be effectively managed for future generations; the following recommendations will assist in achieving correct disposal of waste:
Develop awareness through government campaigns to educate the public on the implications of their actions.
Increase number of bins in public places to encourage positive choices to be made.
Promote local beach clean ups through community engagement.
If these actions are taken, this will promote a more sustainable approach to waste management and ensure a brighter future for Australia.
The information complied in this graphic organiser has allowed me to explore the wicked problem of the sustainability of Australia's waste management through an inquiry process. As teachers, it is essential that we understand students and how they learn, therefore, it is critical that we understand exactly how various learning processes, such as inquiry processes, influence learning and develop conceptual understanding (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011). This critical reflection will insightfully, critically and comprehensively evaluate my personal learning of this key issue in HASS through engaging in an inquiry process.

Inquiry based learning is an essential process when engaging with the HASS curriculum to make the teaching and learning authentic, bring life to the curriculum and create active and informed citizens (Reynolds, 2014; Wiggins & McTighe, 2011). Using an inquiry approach to engage with a key issue relatable to the HASS curriculum allowed me to thoroughly explore various aspects of this wicked problem, constructing my own knowledge and learning through a process that catered to my unique learning styles. It allowed me to explore relevant, evidence based primary and secondary sources that assisted in developing my knowledge and further my understanding of the topic, appreciating the topics relevance and importance in a real-world context. Identifying my prior knowledge before engaging with such sources allowed me to visually see the progression of learning using this inquiry process and the positive implications it can have on fostering motivation, authenticity and relatability to the classroom context. Through engagement with the primary and secondary sources that further developed my understanding of this topic, I was able to suggest achievable recommendations and further actions that could be taken to prevent this wicked problem for having a negative impact on future generations. In addition, exploring further actions and recommendations allowed me to understand importance and significance of considering the Catholic Teaching Principles, particularly Stewardship of Creation, in creating active and informed citizens who will positively contribute to a sustainable future for Australia's waste management.

Engaging through this inquiry process has enabled me to understand, first hand, how effective an inquiry process is for extending and enhancing student learning and was extremely affective in developing my own understanding through investigation. This inquiry process allowed me to uncover that although Australia's waste management system is sustainable alone, without Australian citizens taking responsibility and accountability for their own waste management, a sustainable future will not be achieved. By engaging through inquiry, it has become apparent that the inquiry process is fundamental in the teaching and learning of HASS and will be a process that will be embedded into my personal teaching pedagogy.
1.
Is our current waste management in Australia sustainable long-term?
2.
What could be possible reasons that Australia’s waste management plan is not as sustainable as it has been in the past?
3.
Where does most of Australia's waste go if it does not end up in landfill and what are the implications for our future?
4.
How sustainable is Australia’s waste management processes in comparison to other countries?
National Waste Report 2016
http://www.environment.gov.au/protection/national-waste-policy/national-waste-reports/national-waste-report-2016
This source identifies data collection and analysis, waste policies and identifies waste generation of each state within Australia. This information enables Australia's current waste management plan to be examined to determine whether it is sustainable long-term. Figure 26 identifies the countries that are most sustainably managing waste. This figure indicates that of the 29 countries analysed, 17 countries are currently more sustainable than Australia; which are primarily European countries.
This graphic organiser will demonstrate my ability to apply inquiry learning to a key issue in the Humanities and Social Sciences (HASS) curriculum. The wicked problem, 'Is Australia's waste management sustainable', will be explored considering the Australian Curriculum and Catholic Social Teaching Principles. It will address the importance of inquiry-based learning through examination of waste management and how it affects society in the past, present and future. It is essential for teachers to understand students and how they learn, therefore, it is important for teachers to position themselves as students to understand exactly how various learning processes, such as inquiry processes, influence learning and develop conceptual understanding (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011).

Substantive guiding questions and annotations will clearly demonstrate personal learning, findings and recommendations for further action regarding the wicked problem of waste management. Identifying, discussing and deliberating wicked problems, such as waste management, is essential to investigate and seek solutions for ‘unsolvable’ issues in the world and engage students in issues that are directly of concern to them; relating learning to real-world contexts (Nayler, 2014). The learning and teaching of HASS must be authentic, meaningful and relevant to students to engage and motivate them in their learning (Marsh & Hart, 2011). Therefore, exploring the wicked problem of the sustainability of waste management will support inquiry learning by making connections to real-world problems, investigating topics that matter to them and enable students to take action to positively impact future generations; resulting in students becoming active and informed citizens.

This issue is age appropriate for primary aged students and is particularly important for students to explore at a young age to ensure they become active and informed citizens to promote sustainable waste management in the future. Waste management in directly investigated in the Geography strand of the HASS Curriculum in Year 4 exploring the importance of sustainably, disposing of waste and the implications this could have on our environment if it is not sustainably managed [ACHASSK090] (Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority, 2018; Gilbert, 2012). According to educational theorist Jean Piaget, students in Year 4 are at the concrete operational stage, whereby they begin to become aware of external features and understand that everyone feels, believe and thinks differently (Reynolds, 2014). This confirms that this issue is age appropriate for students in Year 4 as they begin to explore and understand the world outside of their own thoughts, beliefs, feelings and understandings (Browett & Ashman, 2008). Finally, this idea of being conscious of the earth’s resources is supported in the Catholic Social Teaching Principle of Stewardship of Creation which will promote respect and care for the natural environment and identity how humans must ethically portion the precious resources of the earth to maintain a sustainable future (Caritas Australia, 2018).
Rationale
Plastic Pollution: Interview with Marine Scientist Jennifer Lavers
This interview by Jennifer Lavers from the Institute of Marine and Antarctic Studies furthered my understanding of this topic by confirming the critical role Australian citizens hold in taking action in the war against waste and the negative impact it is currently having on our marine environment.
War on Waste
The television program below discusses how disposable Australia has become in comparison to the past and declares a 'War on Waste'.
Population Growth
The interview below with researcher Mark McCrindle discusses Australia's increase in population - a possible implication for Australia's waste management system not being as sustainable as in the past
Australians Spend Less on Food but Waste More of it Than We Did in the 1970s (Newspaper Article)
http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-06-19/war-on-waste-australians-waste-food-because-its-cheap/8624728
This newspaper article extended my understanding of the possible implications that have resulted in Australia's waste management plan to not be as sustainable as it has been in the paste; affirming that Australian's are more wasteful and disposable than ever before.

Australia, The Fourth Biggest Producer Of Municipal Waste: Let’s Do Better!
http://www.cmaecocycle.net/blog/australia-forth-biggest-producer-municipal-waste-lets-better/
This newspaper article also extended my understanding of this guided question by identifying research of how wasteful Australia has become in comparison to the past and what citizens can do in the future to ensure a more sustainable future is achieved.

Wasteful Consumption in Australia
http://www.tai.org.au/documents/dp_fulltext/DP77.pdf
This research based Government document identifies Australian's wasteful consumption and reasons why such behaviors exist in Australian's today; furthering my understanding of this guided question.
Turning Rubbish Into Animals
http://education.abc.net.au/home#!/media/2071353/turning-rubbish-into-animals
This source identifies the issue of marine debris and how citizens can use pollution to educate others on unsustainable waste management practices; furthering my understanding by creating artefacts from rubbish.
https://www.underwaterworld.com.au/
Weigh Your Waste
http://education.abc.net.au/home#!/media/2627187/weigh-your-waste
This video suggests that the average Australian household are not aware of the correct ways to dispose of their waste.
How Big is the Global Recycling Industry?
https://tradr.com/how-big-is-the-global-recycling-industry/

This image furthers my understanding of how sustainable Australia's waste management is in comparison to other countries.
The following primary source have furthered my understanding of possible reasons why Australia's waste management plan is as sustainable as it has been in the past.
By Brittany Smith
Full transcript