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A

ADHD
by

ajda mustafa

on 19 May 2014

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Transcript of A

A
D
H
D
By: Ajda Mustafa, Iman Malik, Mikela Padilla, Nick Champman, Tash Singh
What is ADHD?
What is ADD?
A
ttention
D
eficit
H
yperactivity
D
isorder
Neuro-biological/behavioral
3 types of ADHD
First diagnosed in children
Often persists to adolscents & adulthood years
Difficulty controlling physical actions
Inattentive, restless, hyperactive
Attention Deficit Distoder
Minus Hyperactivity (H)
Subtype of ADHD
Marked Inattentiveness
Tend to be shy, calm, daydream

- Environmental facors
- Imapred socially & academically
- Low self-esteem, poor relationships,
-Highly intuative & imaginative
-Passionate about interests


Many Myths of ADHD
Myth #1: All people with ADHD are hyperactive.

Myth #2: ADHD is not a real medical disorder.

Myth #3: Only children are diagnosed with ADHD.

Myth #4: ADHD is the result of bad parenting.

Lifestyle
1798: Doctors studied “mental restlessness”

1800s: “A morbid defect in moral control” that was treated with corporeal punishment

1904: The Story of Fidgety Phillip

1968: Published as hyperkinetic impulse disorder in the second DSM

of ADHD
1980: Third edition of DSM changed the name to ADD
1990: diagnosed cases of ADHD began to climb
2000: 4th edition of DSM established the 3 subtypes used today
-Combined type ADHD
-Predominantly inattentive type ADHD
-Predominantly hyperactive-impulsive type ADHD

History Continued...
Treatment
http://www.sinir.org/cocuk-ve-ergenlerde-psikoterapi-oncesinde-bilinmesi-gerekenler.html
http://www.waghostwriter.com/2014/01/20/the-physical-effects-of-adderall/
http://www.drmarkmckee.com/services/therapy-services
Medicine
Options?
stimulants, non-stimulants, antidepressants
How do they work?
regulate dopamine and norepinephrine
Side effects?
Psychotherapy
behavior
thought processes
dealing with having a "disorder"
social skills
Parenting Training
education
tips + skills
self-care
Who's at Risk for ADHD?
Other Risk Factors

- Age
- Genetics & Heredity
- Gender
4:1 to 9:1
- Cigarette & Alcohol use
- Nutrition & Diet

Signs & Symptoms
3 Main Symptoms
3 Subcategories
Infant/adolescent
Adults
Elderly
Diagnosing ADHD
Thorough research in diagnosing children & adults.

Reference for evaluation made.

Symptoms must be inappropriate for developmental age

Conclusive medical examination:

- Medical Exam

-Medical History (medical issues, personal, family, school records)

-Interviews and questionnaires (parent, child, teacher, secondary caregiver)

-ADHD rating scales (based on scores from questionnaires and DSM-IV)


**
The diagnosis for ADD is the same as the diagnosis for ADHD, the only differentiation in the DSM-IV is the absence ofhyperactivity as a criterion for diagnosis.
DSM-IV Criteria for ADHD
1. Inattention: Six or more symptoms of inattention for children up to age 16, or five or more for adolescents 17 and older and adults; symptoms of inattention have been present for at least 6 months, and they are inappropriate for developmental level:


a. Close attention to details, careless mistakes.

b. Often has trouble holding attention on tasks or play activities.

c. Often does not seem to listen when spoken to directly.

d. Often does not follow through on instructions and fails to finish schoolwork, chores, or duties in the workplace (e.g., loses focus, side-tracked)

e. Often has trouble organizing tasks and activities.

f. Often avoids, dislikes, or is reluctant to do tasks that require mental effort over a long period of time (such as schoolwork or homework).

g. Often loses things necessary for tasks and activities (e.g., school materials, pencils, books, tools, wallets, keys, paperwork, eyeglasses, mobile telephones).

h. If often easily distracted.

i. Is often forgetful in daily activities.


Criteria Continued...
2. Hyperactivity and Impulsivity: Six or more symptoms of hyperactivity-impulsivity for children up to age 16, or five or more for adolescents 17 and older and adults; symptoms of hyperactivity-impulsivity have been present for at least 6 months to an extent that is disruptive and inappropriate for the person’s developmental level:

a. Often fidgets with or taps hands or feet, or squirms in seat.

b. Often leaves seat in situations when remaining seated is expected.

c. Often runs about or climbs in situations where it is not appropriate (adolescents or adults may be limited to feeling restless).

d. Often unable to play or take part in leisure activities quietly.

e. Is often "on the go" acting as if "driven by a motor".

f. Often talks excessively.

g. Often blurts out an answer before a question has been completed.

h. Often has trouble waiting his/her turn.

i. Often interrupts or intrudes on others (e.g., butts into conversations or games)



Critieria #3
In addition, following condition must be met:

a. Several inattentive or hyperactive-impulsive symptoms were present before age 12 years.

b. Several symptoms are present in two or more setting, (e.g., at home, school or work; with friends or relatives; in other activities).

c. There is clear evidence that the symptoms interfere with, or reduce the quality of, social, school, or work functioning.

d. The symptoms do not happen only during the course of schizophrenia or another psychotic disorder. The symptoms are not better explained by another mental disorder (e.g. Mood Disorder, Anxiety Disorder, Dissociative Disorder, or a Personality Disorder).

Thank You!
Sources:
http://www.additudemag.com/adhd/article/873.html
http://psychcentral.com/blog/archives/2011/06/24/9-myths-misconceptions-and-stereotypes-about-adhd/
http://www.healthline.com/health-slideshow/history-adhd-timeline
http://www.healthline.com/health/adhd/history-of-adhd
http://www.webmd.com/add-adhd/guide/adhd-medical-treatment
http://psychcentral.com/lib/additional-treatments-for-adhd/0001205
http://www.medscape.org/viewarticle/523887_4
http://www.rxlist.com/adderall-xr-capsules-drug/medication-guide.htm
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1600-0447.2011.01786.x/full
http://www.drugs.com/adderall.html
http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/adhd/basics/tests-diagnosis/con-20023647
http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/adhd/diagnosis.html
http://www.childmind.org/en/posts/ask-an-expert/2011-8-30-what-difference-between-add-and-adhd
http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2013/03/31/us/adhd-in-children.html?ref=health
http://www.webmd.com/add-adhd/guide/attention-deficit-hyperactivity-disorder-adhd
http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/adhd/facts.html
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