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Grammar

Verb tense, Shifting point of view, Coordinate and subordination
by

Joey Alvarez

on 4 February 2013

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Transcript of Grammar

By: Patrick Alvarez, Joey Alvarez, Alyssia Pacheco, & Katie Pare Shifting Point of View Coordination and Subordination Grammar Verb Tense The form of a verb that indicates time whether it is past, present, or future. It also indicates whether the action is ongoing or complete. Coordination: The grammatical connection of two or more words, phrases, or clauses to give them equal emphasis and importance. Subordination: Words, phrases, and clauses that make one element of a sentence dependent on, or subordinate to, another. A Lesson For You The change of views, for example from one persons opinions to another persons or from a point of view when you are young to when you grew old. Four Principle Parts of a Verb: The Infinitive: The Present Participle: The Past: The Past Participle: Types of Verb Tense: Present Tense: Past Tense: Past Perfect Tense: Present Perfect Tense: "Emma loves playing with the stuffed
monkey, but she hates playing with
the teddy bear." "While Chris killed the bug
on the table, Ella shrieked in fear." Example of Shifting Point of View:

"When a child has disappointed one of their parents, you can try smiling at them in order to get on their good side." F = for
A = and
N = nor
B = but
O = or
Y = yet
S = so The Seven Coordinating Conjunctions Parts of this Example Explained: 1. "...a child" is an example of the first point of view.
"When a child has disappointed one of their parents, you can try smiling at them in order to get on their good side." 2. The next point of view would be, "...you can..." The sentence first begins telling the reader about how a child has disappointed someone, and continues to tell how what "you," another point of view can do to help. When writing an essay, having a shift in point of view can help to explain how one person's actions may affect someone else, though they are hard to use, and can be confusing to the reader. To correct this statement, instead of saying, "a child," replace it with "you," in order to make the two point of views match, and create one. The Infinitive: (ex. see) The Present Participle: (ex. seeing) The Past: (ex. saw) The Past Participle: (ex. seen) An infinitive will almost always begin with to followed by the simple form of the verb, like this: to + verb = infinitive Ex.) No matter what, Cheryl makes sure that she will always be able to see her sister at least once a day. The present participle always ends in -ing. Participles can function as adjectives or nouns. Past and present participles often function as adjectives that describe nouns. The past usually ends in -ed for regular verbs. Irregular verbs include "bring.. brought" and "sing... sung." Ex.) The whining dog whimpered all night long. Fun Fact!: Whenever a present participle functions as a noun, you call it a gerund. Ex.) Victoria hates dancing because her lack of rhythm makes her feel foolish.

Dancing = the direct object of the verb hates. Regular Ex.) Our pet monkey climbed Mrs. Dabnee's banana tree. Participles can function as adjectives or nouns. Past and present participles often function as adjectives that describe nouns. Irregular Ex.) The whole family was so thankful that Aunt Shirly brought cupcakes to the reunion. Present tense expresses actions occuring at the time of speaking. Since the present perfect is a present tense, it implies that the result is still true and relevant today. Ex.) In science today, advancements are being made in the search for a cure for cancer. A past perfect tense is used to express an action completed in the past before a second completed task. Ex.) I had finished my homework before I watched the movie. Ex.) I am going to the market to buy apples and oranges. Because essays are usually written in past tense, and are written about past experiences, present tense and present perfect tense are rarely used in them. Past perfect usually uses the word "had" before the verb is stated. Past tense is used to express an action completed in the past. Ex.) I watched television yesterday at approximately 4 o'clock. The past is described as something that has previously occurrred. Ex.) I used to sing every day, but then I strained my voice. Example of a Subordinate Clause: The words " While Chris killed the bug on the table.." cannot stand on their own. Making it a dependent clause. However once "..Ella shrieked in fear" is added, the sentence is completed. The reader will not have sufficient information without the second part of the sentence. Example of a Coordinate Clause: The first part of the sentence is able to stand alone, as well as the second part of the sentence. The grammatical connection is the word, "but."
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