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Lucy Duke Cotton to Coat

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by

Elizabeth Harris

on 19 November 2015

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Transcript of Lucy Duke Cotton to Coat

What is cotton?
Cotton is a plant that grows a fruit called cotton ball!
Step 2
Harvesting
Step 3
Transport
Step 4
Compacted into Bail
Grading
Cotton to Coat
When the cotton is ready, a machine called "the picker" strips the cotton and drops the plants into a big basket in a module builder. The module builder then pushes the cotton extremely tight so that it will stay together in a large rectangle.
The cotton then travels to the gym where it goes into a gin machine. (In other words; the seeds get picked out of the cotton in the special by machine.)
The ginned cotton (processed cotton) is sent to a bail press where once again it gets compacted into a bail.
Step 5
The quality of the cotton is then graded to see how much it will sell for.
This machine is called the the module builder
This machine is called the picker
Cotton to coat
Step 1
Plantation
Cotton starts as a little seed that is planted in spring. At several weeks of age, the healthy cotton plant will begin to form flowers which will first appear white or yellow. The next day, it will turn red and then the next day, it will fall off leaving behind a small ball in it's place. This is commonly referred to as white, red and dead! Over the next few weeks, the ball will grow until it finally bursts open leaving a white cotton bud!
Step 6
Transport
The bails of cotton are then taken out of the factory and loaded onto a truck.
Step 7
Selling
The cotton is then taken to a
to be sold.
Lucinda Duke
Step 8
What happens next?
What happens to the cotton once it has being purchased in the factory? Well that is up to the person who brought it as cotton can be used for many/in many different things.
The cotton picker machine!
How has the cotton picker developed over time?
Cotton Picker Machine
How has the cotton picker developed over time?
A good cotton picker could harvest 200 pounds in one day (90.7185kg) compared to today's cotton picker machines that can harvest 200 pounds(90.7185kg) in 90 seconds! The first cotton picker machines were only capable of harvesting one row of cotton at a time, but were still able to replace up to forty hand laborers. Over time, as technology has developed, so has the cotton pickers. Now, they are capable of harvesting up to 8 rows of cotton at a time.

Cotton Picker Machine
Would you believe that the cotton picker never used to be around? Well farmers originally had to harvest their cotton by hand!
Men, women and children worked in the fields tending the cotton plants from dawn, till dusk. In 1850, the first attempt at creating a cotton picker was made however it wasn't until 1942 (the middle of World War II) that an International Harvester built the first cotton picker.
How has the cotton picker developed over time?
Many cotton picker machines now have field monitor and global positioning systems. This technology allows the cotton real (where the cotton goes through) to be continually monitored and helps farmers determine areas where seed or fertilizer rates should be adjusted to get the best results.
Cotton Picker Machine
Is the cotton picker more efficient?
The cotton picker is so much more efficient as it is much quicker and so much easier for workers who use to have to hand pick the cotton in harvesting season. It is also so much more efficient as it can harvest up to eight rows of cotton at once.
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