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The Grammar Of American Sign Language (ASL)

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ashley deacon

on 5 December 2013

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Transcript of The Grammar Of American Sign Language (ASL)

The Grammar of
American Sign Language

ASL Sentence Structure
In American Sign Language (ASL), you can choose to assemble the words in your sentence in different orders, depending on the dialogue. Some sentences should be signed in a natural English to avoid confusion.
What Is American Sign Language?
American Sign Language (ASL) is a complete, complex language that employs signs made by moving the hands combined with facial expressions and postures of the body. (NIDCD)
Tenses
You indicate future tense by signing and saying "will" at the end of a sentence. The farther you sign the word "will" from the front of your body, the farther into the future you go.

Pronominalization
Pronouns are indicated by pointing to either a person or thing that is present or a place in the signing space that used as a referent point for a person or thing.
They & Them

Using pronouns in the absence of a person or object.
Ex:
MY BROTHER,
point-right
, HE VISIT ME.
The Pronominalization was when
"he"
was used. This can be shown by pointing at the brother or a spot in the signing space to refer to as
"he"
.
By: Ashley Deacon
A
S
L
Is ASL a Universal Language?
The basic structure in English is Subject-Verb-Object. (SVO)
In ASL, the basic word order is Subject- Object- Verb. (SOV)
However, not all simple sentences can have SOV word order.
The phrase
BOB KATE KISS
translates
"Bob and Kate kiss."

But,
BOB KISS KATE
translates
"Bob kisses Kate."
Some simple sentences can have SVO or SOV word order. The meaning usually does not change with placement.
EX: I am going to class.
You sign close to your body, as you when signing anything.
The sign "finish" will be presented at the beginning or the end of the sentence, usually at chest level. This signals that everything has already happened.
EX:
English:
I have finished working.
ASL:
ME WORK - FINISH.
Past Tense
Future Tense
EX:
English:
I will send you a letter.
ASL:
ME WILL SEND- you LETTER.
Present Tense
Not Yet
It is often placed at the end of the sentence or it can be alone as a response
EX:
English:
I haven't done my homework yet.
ASL:
ME HOMEWORK FINISH, NOT-YET.
EX: Bob kisses the frog.
S: Bob
V: kisses
O: frog
EX: I play a game.
S: Me
O: game
V: play
ME CLASS Go-to.
ME Go-to CLASS.
NO
Universal Sign Language.
NOT
derived from English.
ASL is a separate language with its own rules of syntax and grammar.
Non-manual Markers
YES/NO Questions
According to Life Print,

Non-manual Markers
are the non signed signals that influence the meaning of your signs. This includes facial expressions, head tilts, head nods, head shakes, shoulder raising, mouth morphemes.


Are you a student?
Do you have a sister?
Examples
Non-manual Markers
Raise your eyebrows
Lean your head forward
Hold the last sign in your sentence
WH- Questions
Examples
Who is the boy?
What is your name?
Where do you live?
Non-manual Markers
Lower Your eyebrows
Lean your head forward
Hold the last sign in your sentence
WRITE verses WRITE
Regular
Careless
RECENTLY
RECENTLY
(Last week)
RECENTLY
(Just happened)
"Talking With Your Hands Listening With Your Eyes"
By: Gabriel Grayson
I
nformation provided by: ASL Grammar - For Dummies
Information provided by: ASL Grammar - For Dummies
Files.start-american-sign-language.com
wordpress.com
Thank You!
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