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Copy of Copy of Scientific Notation

7th grade math - Chapter 4-5
by

Linzi Larson

on 28 September 2014

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Transcript of Copy of Copy of Scientific Notation

The number 10 is beyond measure
SCIENTIFIC NOTATION
Okay . . .
let's try it
Let's try another . . .
Let's try this . . .
8th Grade
General Math
If we have the number 8900 and
we want to write it in scientific notation,
what would we do?
What if we have the number 23,415.
How do we write it in
scientific notation?
What if we have the number
0.0007801?
8900 x 10
Where does the decimal point go?
What power of ten should we have?
What if we have the
number 65,000,000?
Where does the decimal point go? What power of 10 should we have?
I think that we have
only worked with really
numbers.
WHAT IF WE TRY SOME
REALLY NUMBERS?
small
How about the number 72,000,000?
Where does the decimal point go?
What power
of 10 do
we use?
Write it down, please.
Because the original number was
less than 1, we will have a
negative exponent.
BIG
Write it down, please.
Write it down, please.
Can you do it?
uh huh . . . write it down, please.
When we worked with the numbers
greater than one
, our exponent
was a
positive
number.
Did you notice that?
Of course you did!
Write it down, please.
decimal
There will be one non-zero digit to the left of the decimal.
Then count the number of places you moved the decimal. That is the exponent.
Where does the decimal point go?
What number do we use for the exponent?
POWERFUL
There is one non-zero digit to the
left of the decimal point. we
moved the decimal 7 places. So the
exponent is 7.
There is one non-zero digit
to the left of the decimal
point.
We moved the decimal point
four places. So the
exponent is 4.
There should be one non-zero
digit to the right of the decimal
point.
How many places did
you move the decimal
point?
Oh! One last thing . . . since the
original number was less than one,
Will the exponent be positive
or negative?
Try these on your own:
Write the following in scientific notation:
4,000
27,365
230,000,000
Here are a couple more:
Write the following in scientific notation:

0.0345
0.00072
0.00000000018
Here it is more simply . . .
This number started out as 602,000,000,000000,000,000,000.
YIKES!
Let's start out with
something smaller . . .
Independent practice:
Write using scientific notation:
22,078,600
64.3
0.0000056388
998.653
45.668
0.007485
7,960,000,000
63,000,000
0.0602
Let's see if
the video makes
more sense now.
We moved the decimal point four places to the right. The original number was less than 1, so we
have a negative exponent.
This is really,
really
tiny.
Again a negative exponent.
The original number was less
than 1.
Is that what you got?
Easy, peasy?
Yep . . . you've got this :D
Scientific notation is
very POWERFUL.
Homework:
Workbook page 30
#1 - 24 all
Converting to Scientific Notation. . .
Example:
Given 4,630,000
4.63 (move the decimal point 6 places)
Answer: 4.63 x 10
The original number was greater than 1 so the exponent is positive.
6
[
]
This is gonna be cool!
Are you ready for this?
Of course you are :D
Full transcript