Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

The Four Part Processing Model for Word Recognition

No description
by

Angela Hase

on 11 June 2015

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of The Four Part Processing Model for Word Recognition

The Four Part Processing Model for Word Recognition
Fluency
Phonological
Processor

Orthographic
Processor

Meaning
Processor

Context
Processor

Language
Input

Language
Output

Reading
Input

Reading
Output

Phonological
Processor
Sounds
Perceive
Remember
Interpret
Produce
our own language and learn the sounds of another language
Prosody
Imitate
Produce
Rise and fall of voice during phrasing
The Phonological Processor is the place in the brain that understands that a combination of sounds create words. It also remembers those combinations.
It mentally categorizes and identifies the phonemes in a language system.
It produces the speech sounds and syllable sequences in words.
It compares and distinguishes words that sound similar.
It remembers and repeats the words in a phrase or the sounds in a word.
It retrieves specific words from the mental diction and pronounces them.
It holds the sounds of words in memory so that a word can be written down.
It takes apart the sounds in a word so that they can be matched with alphabetic symbols.
Teacher Implications:
Children who have difficulty often forget letters, have trouble blending sounds, and have trouble spelling.
Teachers must teach phoneme identification, pronunciation, and awareness.
Orthographic
Processor
Visual System
Letters
Punctuation Marks
Spaces
Letter Patterns
Recognized by
Curves
Straight Lines
Angles
Recognizes letters and formation of letters
Associates letters with speech sounds
Recognizes letter sequences and patterns
Fluently recognizes whole words
Recalls letters for spelling
Teacher Implications:
Children with orthographic weaknesses will struggle with sight words, have difficultly spelling, and will read slowly.
Teachers should call attention to internal details of the printed words.
The Orthographic Processor is the place in the brain that is able to make sense out of the shapes of letters and symbols. It is able to identify them and match them to sounds.
Meaning Processor
Phonological
information (sounds)
Orthographic
information (letter recognition)
The Meaning Processor makes meaning out of the sounds and letters and relates them to words
Storing the inventory of words
Organizing the mental dictionary
Constructing meaning of new words
by
The Meaning Processor understands synonym relationships, roots and other morphemes, spelling patterns, common meaning associates, and connotations.
The Meaning Processor stores word meanings by:
Other words in the same semantic field
Categories and concepts
Examples of words in phrase context
The sounds, spelling, and syllables in the word
Meaningful parts
Implications for teachers:
Children with meaning weaknesses will have weak vocabularies, limited knowledge of English, and weakness in verbal reasoning ability
Teachers should teach vocabulary with attention to all of the ways the Meaning Processor stores word meanings.
Context Processor
Supports the Meaning Processor
the sentence and sentence sequence in which a word is embedded
the concepts or events that are being discussed or reported in the text.
refers to
The Context Processor helps us understand the right meaning of a word. This is especially important because many words have many meanings or sound like other words that have different meanings.
The Context Processor interprets words that we have heard, have previously names, or partially identified.
It looks at language, experiences, and knowledge of concepts.
Teacher Implications:
Students who have troubles with context processes with have trouble understanding the text.
Teachers should teach background information that students need to interpret what they have read.
Phonics
Taken from LTRS, Module 1: the Challenge of Learning to Read (Learning Essentials for Teachers of Reading and Spelling) by Louisa C. Moats
Full transcript