Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Let's Talk About Sex

No description
by

Guy McDermott

on 26 March 2014

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Let's Talk About Sex

Let's Talk About Sex
Students will reflect upon the many choices they are faced with in relation to their health. They will analyse how these decisions they make can impact their health both in positive and negative ways. Students will develop an understanding of sexual health, as well as the issues that will influence an individual’s ability to make decisions in regards to their sexual health.
In this unit:
The Question Box

What is it you would like to learn during this term?
What questions do you have about Sexual Health.
Write your question (anonymously) and submit to the question box.
What Sexual Education looks like in the movies...
What Sexual Education will look like in your classroom
Gain knowledge and understanding of sexual health choices.
Learn skills to maintain a high standard of health.
Understand sexual orientation recognise the complexities of adolescence .
Investigate sexual health products and services within the community
Question: Why do you think the government enforce Age of Consent Laws?
Deciding to become sexually active
Question: Outline 10 questions an individual might ask themselves when deciding if they are ready to become sexually active?
Sex and Consent
It can be hard to know if the person you're with wants to be more intimate with you or not. Sometimes it's hard to ask or find out how the other person is feeling. It's important that the person you're with gives their consent to the level of intimacy you have with them.
How do you know if the person you're with has given their consent?
The only way to know for sure if someone has given consent is if they tell you. It's not always easy to let people know that you are not happy about something. Sometimes the person you're with might look like they're happy doing something but on the inside they're not. They might not know what to say or how to tell you that they are uncomfortable.


One of the best ways to determine if someone is uncomfortable with any situation, especially with a sexual one, is to simply ask. What are some examples of the questions you might ask:
Is there anything that you don't want to do?
Are you happy with this?
Are you comfortable?
Do you want to stop?
Do you want to go further?
Stopping
You always have the right to say 'no' and you always have the right to change your mind at any time regardless of your past experiences with other people or the person you are with. Identify some things you can say or do if you want to stop:
no
say 'I want to stop'
say 'I need to go to the toilet'
In a situation where the other person isn't listening to you and you feel unsafe, you could pretend you are going to vomit (it's amazing how quickly someone moves away from you if they think you are going to be sick).
Sexting
Sex + Text = SEXTING
Activity: Mindmap the dangers associated with SEXTING.
Sexting
Sexting Facts
Sharing sexualized or naked images, videos or text messages with someone over the internet or mobile phone is what people call sexting (basically, a short form of sex + texting). Unfortunately, some people think that this is part of a normal relationship but the reality is that only a small proportion of young people sext.
Even if you think that you are happy to send or receive a message from someone, once you have sent it you have lost control of it. Anyone could come across or find the images, such as your future employer or even your mum or dad! Even scarier, they could still be out there when you have kids of your own!
Sexting in Australia
Activity: Watch the following video and answer these questions.
1. Identify the reasons, expressed in the video, that teens are Sexting?
2. Describe the legal issues associated with Sexting?
3. Outline 3 changes to Sage's life caused from the Sexting incident?
Legal Issues Associated with Sexting
If the photo, video or text is about someone under the age of 18, it could be considered child pornography. Under Commonwealth law, if you create this material, send it to someone and/or have it on your phone or computer, you could face up to 15 years in gaol! Even worse, you could be put on the Sex Offenders Register.
How to protect yourself from SEXTING
Don’t create any of these images/videos/texts. You don’t want to ruin your future because of a silly mistake as a teenager.

Don’t ask anyone to send you any sexts.

Report to police if you receive a sext. You never know whether the person in the sext was abused or forced to send that image.
Contraception
Activity: Draw an Egg and Sperm Mindmap to show the different contraceptive options for males and females.
What is Contraception?
Contraception' means method to prevent pregnancy. There a many common forms of contraception including 'male condoms' and 'the pill'.
All forms of contraception have some possible side effects and failure rate. While the some are also less protective against Sexually Transmitted Diseases and Infections. All of which must be taken in to considerations by the individual when selecting which contraceptive method is right for them and their partner.
Why use Contraception?
Prevent pregnancy
Reduce chances of contracting STI's
Peace of mind
Full transcript