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David Wood 8th Grade Integrated Science Curriculum Map [TEMPLATE]

General outline for an Earth Systems Astronomy Unit
by

David Wood

on 25 April 2016

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Transcript of David Wood 8th Grade Integrated Science Curriculum Map [TEMPLATE]

8th Grade Integrated Science
Standard 1
Students will understand the nature of changes in matter.
ILO's
Students will be able to apply scientific processes, communicate scientific ideas effectively, and understand the nature of science.
Standard 4
Science Benchmark
Earth is a dynamic planet. Processes that change Earth's surface operated in the past much as they do today. Evidence of past surface and climatic changes are indicated in the rock and fossil records. Rocks are composed of minerals. Rocks and minerals cycle through processes that change their form.
Several processes contribute to changing Earth’s surface. Earth’s surface is changed by heat flowing from Earth's hot interior toward the cooler surface and by atmospheric processes. Earth’s surface can change abruptly through volcanoes and earthquakes. Earth’s surface can change gradually through mountain building, weathering, erosion, and deposition. Small changes that repeatedly occur over very long time periods can add up to major changes in Earth’s surface.
Standard 3
Standard 2
Obj1: Students will use science process and thinking skills
Obj2: Students will manifest scientific attitudes and interests
Obj3: Students will Demonstrate an understanding of General Science concepts, Principles, and systems.
Obj4: Students will communicate effectively using scientific language and reasoning
Obj5: Students will demonstrate an awareness of the social and historical aspects of science.
Obj6: Students will develop an understanding of the nature of science.
When planning your monthly, weekly, and daily activities these 6 objectives need to be incorporated through all your activities and they need to be on the back of your mind whenever you are planning.
BENCHMARK - STANDARD (1) PRE-TEST
BENCHMARK - STANDARD (1) POST-TEST
BENCHMARK - STANDARD (2) PRE-TEST
BENCHMARK - STANDARD (2) POST-TEST
BENCHMARK - STANDARD (3) POST-TEST
BENCHMARK - STANDARD (3) PRE-TEST
BENCHMARK - STANDARD (4) PRE-TEST
BENCHMARK - STANDARD (4) POST-TEST
BEGIN THE YEAR WITH LESSONS BASED AROUND THE NATURE OF SCIENCE AND THE PRINCIPLES OF DOING SCIENCE (Experimental Design)
-FOR MORE HELP SEE THE MAP-

"NOS - SCIENCE PRINCIPLES - LAB SAFETY"
This is done well by teaming with your language arts department and by incorporating daily writing into your class. It is also vital that students are using technical writing in class to create lab reports that present their data.
Resource: Common Core Writing Standards for Literacy in History/sCocial Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects

http://www.corestandards.org/assets/CCSSI_ELA%20Standards.pdf
Resources:
Umbrellaology - GD (9th Wood)
Psuedoscience Water Witching GD 9th Wood
Lab Write Up Template - GD 9th Grover
Resources:
Nature of Science/Psuedoscience Module - GD (9th Wood)
NOS Interactive Reading - http://undsci.berkeley.edu/article/intro_01
In order to meet this objective it is essential that scientific inquiry is introduced over and over again.

The goal would be to have Students engaged in experimental design activities at least once every two weeks. This is best done by using backwards design and looking at the ideas you are teaching and then asking yourself how could we learn this by experimentation.
How to use this curriculum map
Learning Objective
-Materials-
Inquiry Questions
Assessments
Resources
Vocabulary
Engage-
Explore-
Explain-
Expand-
Apply
Resources in the lesson refer you to a document or page located on the internet. "GD" indicates that the file is "Google Doc" while "SD" indicates that the file is in "Skydrive" and the corresponding owner's file will be listed.

We request that as you develop lessons or awesome teaching strategies during curriculum development that you share your files so we can have a world wide FREE curriculum sharing program running open to anyone who is willing to not be greedy and share a little. We will be able to see your map on the district site so if someone thinks the lesson you planned is awesome they can look at your map, see the file name, and then pull it up in skydrive or google docs.

To access the file you must have the collection shared with you in your own Google Docs account or sky drive. All files are "read only" but can be copied and modified by going to "file" and selecting "make a copy".

To get access to a teacher's collection email the request to them. The following teachers have contributed collections to their current map:

Tyson Grover - b.tyson.grover@gmail.com
David Wood - mrwooscience@gmail.com
Required
Background
Knowledge
Links and Resources
Your own template that fits your needs
During your development you are going to probably develop your own style to your prezi planning we all are here to share ideas and creativity so if you create a new lesson, unit, or week template please share it.
Template Dave Wood and Tyson Grover are currently using
Thank you for taking the time to become part of our development community. your copy of the map is to be used however you see fit. The general idea is to have a large scale view of your curriculum starting at the learning goals and funneling down to assessment and eventually instruction. Looking at the year in a grand scale and a microscopic scale allows us to create a flow of information that makes sense.

As you begin the year and start to use the map here are some ideas of things that can be stored on the map, also remember it is 3-dimensional so you basically have an infinite canvas to work with.

Ideas of what to store on map
weekly outlines - typed on map
links to resources
PPT presentations
pictures
Lesson plans
Teacher journal and reflection
Jokes
Files from other educators
Grocery lists
Prezi is easy to use and 100% collaborative in real time!
How to use this curriculum map
Learning Objective
-Materials-
Inquiry Questions
Assessments
Resources
Vocabulary
Engage-
Explore-
Explain-
Expand-
Apply
Resources in the lesson refer you to a document or page located on the internet. "GD" indicates that the file is "Google Doc" while "SD" indicates that the file is in "Skydrive" and the corresponding owner's file will be listed.

We request that as you develop lessons or awesome teaching strategies during curriculum development that you share your files so we can have a world wide FREE curriculum sharing program running open to anyone who is willing to not be greedy and share a little. We will be able to see your map on the district site so if someone thinks the lesson you planned is awesome they can look at your map, see the file name, and then pull it up in skydrive or google docs.

To access the file you must have the collection shared with you in your own Google Docs account or sky drive. All files are "read only" but can be copied and modified by going to "file" and selecting "make a copy".

To get access to a teacher's collection email the request to them. The following teachers have contributed collections to their current map:

Tyson Grover - b.tyson.grover@gmail.com
David Wood - mrwooscience@gmail.com
Required
Background
Knowledge
Your own template that fits your needs
During your development you are going to probably develop your own style to your prezi planning we all are here to share ideas and creativity so if you create a new lesson, unit, or week template please share it.
Template Dave Wood and Tyson Grover are currently using
Thank you for taking the time to become part of our development community. your copy of the map is to be used however you see fit. The general idea is to have a large scale view of your curriculum starting at the learning goals and funneling down to assessment and eventually instruction. Looking at the year in a grand scale and a microscopic scale allows us to create a flow of information that makes sense.

As you begin the year and start to use the map here are some ideas of things that can be stored on the map, also remember it is 3-dimensional so you basically have an infinite canvas to work with.

Ideas of what to store on map
weekly outlines - typed on map
links to resources
PPT presentations
pictures
Lesson plans
Teacher journal and reflection
Jokes
Files from other educators
Grocery lists
Prezi is easy to use and 100% collaborative in real time!
Things to change and work on
Describe the chemical and physical properties of various substances.
Differentiate
between chemical and physical properties.
Science Benchmark
Chemical change is a primary way that matter on earth changes from one form to another. Energy is involved in chemical and physical change. When chemical or physical changes occur, the total amount of matter and energy remains the same; this is the law of conservation of matter and energy.
Matter can change state through physical change. In a physical change the identity of the atoms does not change.

In a chemical change the identity of the atoms does not change, but the atoms are recombined into a new substance. Evidence for a chemical reaction may include color change, gas given off, and heat or light given off or absorbed. Changing the amount of energy in a chemical system alters the reaction rate. Changing the surface area and/or concentration of reactants changes the rate of chemical reaction.
Language science students should use:
chemical properties, physical properties, chemical change, physical change, reaction, reactants, products, respiration, photosynthesis, temperature, molecules, heat energy, chemical energy, atoms, energy
Classify
substances based on their chemical and physical properties (e.g., reacts with water, does not react with water, flammable or nonflammable, hard or soft, flexible or nonflexible, evaporates or melts at room temperature).
Investigate and report
on the chemical and physical properties of a particular substance.
Observe and evaluate evidence of chemical and physical change.
Identify
observable evidence of a physical change (e.g., change in shape, size, phase).
Identify
observable evidence of a chemical change (e.g., color change, heat or light given off, change in odor, gas given off).
Investigate
the effects of chemical change on physical properties of substances (e.g., cooking a raw egg, iron rusting, polymerization of a resin).
Observe and describe
chemical reactions involving atmospheric oxygen (e.g., rust, fire, respiration, photosynthesis).
Investigate and measure the effects of increasing or decreasing the amount of energy in a physical or chemical change, and relate the kind of energy added to the motion of the particles.
Identify
the kinds of energy (e.g., heat, light, sound) given off or taken in when a substance undergoes a chemical or physical change.
Relate
the amount of energy added or taken away from a substance to the motion of molecules in the substance.
Measure and graph
the relationship between the states of water and changes in its temperature.
Cite
evidence showing that heat may be given off or taken in during a chemical change (e.g., striking a match, mixing vinegar and antacid, mixing ammonium chloride and water).
Plan and conduct
an experiment, and report the effect of adding or removing energy on the chemical and physical changes.
Identify the observable features of chemical reactions.
Identify
the reactants and products in a given chemical change and describe the presence of the same atoms in both the reactants and products.
Cite
examples of common significant chemical reactions (e.g., photosynthesis, respiration, combustion, rusting) in daily life.
Demonstrate
that mass is conserved in a chemical reaction (e.g., mix two solutions that result in a color change or formation of a precipitate and weigh the solutions before and after mixing).
Experiment
with variables affecting the relative rates of chemical changes (e.g., heating, cooling, stirring, crushing, concentration).
Research
and report on how scientists or engineers have applied principles of chemistry to an application encountered in daily life (e.g., heat-resistant plastic handles on pans, rust-resistant paints on highway bridges).
Students will understand that energy from sunlight is changed to chemical energy in plants, transfers between living organisms, and that changing the environment may alter the amount of energy provided to living organisms.
Science Benchmark
The sun is the source for essentially all biological energy. Plants store captured light energy as chemical energy in sugars. Animals eat plants to obtain the energy and matter that they need. The energy from food is used for mechanical and heat energy. The matter is used to build the cells of the organism.
Food chains and food webs are models used to show the transfer of energy and matter among organisms. These models can be used to show relationships among organisms. Organisms, including humans, influence the ability of other organisms to live in a specific environment.
Language science students should use: food web, food chain, photosynthesis, respiration, predator, energy flow, solar energy, chemical energy, mechanical energy, producer, consumer, prey, mutualism, parasitism, competition, environment, capacity
Compare ways that plants and animals obtain and use energy.
Recognize
the importance of photosynthesis in using light energy as part of the chemical process that builds plant materials.
Explain
how respiration in animals is a process that converts food energy into mechanical and heat energy.
Trace
the path of energy from the sun to mechanical energy in an organism (e.g., sunlight - light energy to plants by photosynthesis to sugars - stored chemical energy to respiration in muscle cell - usable chemical energy to muscle contraction- mechanical energy).
Generalize the dependent relationships between organisms.
Categorize
the relationships between organisms (i.e., producer/consumer/decomposer, predator/prey, mutualism/parasitism) and provide examples of each.
Use models
to trace the flow of energy in food chains and food webs.
Formulate
and test a hypothesis on the effects of air, temperature, water, or light on plants (e.g., seed germination, growth rates, seasonal adaptations).
Research
multiple ways that different scientists have investigated the same ecosystem
Analyze human influence on the capacity of an environment to sustain living things.
Describe
specific examples of how humans have changed the capacity of an environment to support specific life forms (e.g., people create wetlands and nesting boxes that increase the number and range of wood ducks, acid rain damages amphibian eggs and reduces population of frogs, clear cutting forests affects squirrel populations, suburban sprawl reduces mule deer winter range thus decreasing numbers of deer).
Distinguish
between inference and evidence in a newspaper or magazine article relating to the effect of humans on the environment.
Infer
the potential effects of humans on a specific food web
Evaluate
and present arguments for and against allowing a specific species of plant or animal to become extinct, and relate the argument to the of flow energy in an ecosystem.
Language science students should use: volcano, earthquake, weathering, minerals, fossils, sedimentary, magma, metamorphic, rock cycle, igneous, sedimentation, deposition, geology, paleontology
Compare rocks and minerals and describe how they are related.
Recognize
that most rocks are composed of minerals.
Observe and describe
the minerals found in rocks (e.g., shape, color, luster, texture, hardness).
Categorize
rock samples as sedimentary, metamorphic, or igneous.
Describe the nature of the changes that rocks undergo over long periods of time.
Diagram
and explain the rock cycle.
Describe
the role of energy in the processes that change rock materials over time.
Use a model
to demonstrate how erosion changes the surface of Earth.
Relate
gravity to changes in Earth’s surface.
Identify
the role of weathering of rocks in soil formation.
Describe and model
the processes of fossil formation.
Describe how rock and fossil evidence is used to infer Earth’s history.
Describe
how the deposition of rock materials produces layering of sedimentary rocks over time.
Identify
the assumptions scientists make to determine relative ages of rock layers.
Explain
why some sedimentary rock layers may not always appear with youngest rock on top and older rocks below (i.e., folding, faulting).
Research
how fossils show evidence of the changing surface of the Earth.
Propose
why more recently deposited rock layers are more likely to contain fossils resembling existing species than older rock layers.
Compare rapid and gradual changes to Earth’s surface.
Describe
how energy from the Earth's interior causes changes to Earth’s surface (i.e., earthquakes, volcanoes).
Describe
how earthquakes and volcanoes transfer energy from Earth's interior to the surface (e.g., seismic waves transfer mechanical energy, flowing magma transfers heat and mechanical energy).
Model
the process of energy buildup and release in earthquakes.
Investigate and report
possible reasons why the best engineering or ecological practices are not always followed in making decisions about building roads, dams, and other structures.
Model
how small changes over time add up to major changes to Earth’s surface.
Science Benchmark
Movement involves one form of energy being transformed into another form. Energy has the potential to exert a force over a distance. Waves transfer energy such as sound, heat, light, and earthquakes through different mediums. Sound and light waves allow organisms to "hear" and "see" the world around them. Energy is classified as either kinetic or potential energy.
Every object exerts a gravitational force on every other object. The distance between objects and mass of the objects determine the force of gravity between them. This force is difficult to measure unless one of the objects has a very large mass. Unbalanced forces cause change in the motion of objects, while balanced forces do not.
Language science students should use: energy, potential energy, kinetic energy, force, gravity, complex machine, wave, friction, amplitude
Students will understand the relationships among energy, force, and motion.
Investigate the transfer of energy through various materials.
Relate
the energy of a wave to wavelength.
Compare
the transfer of energy (i.e., sound, light, earthquake waves, heat) through various mediums.
Describe
the spread of energy away from an energy-producing source.
Compare
the transfer of heat by conduction, convection, and radiation and provide examples of each.
Demonstrate
how white light can be separated into the visible color spectrum.
Examine the force exerted on objects by gravity.
Distinguish
between mass and weight.
Cite
examples of how Earth’s gravitational force on an object depends upon the mass of the object.
Describe
how Earth’s gravitational force on an object depends upon the distance of the object from Earth.
Design and build
structures to support a load.
Engineer (design and build)
a machine that uses gravity to accomplish a task.
Investigate the application of forces that act on objects, and the resulting motion.
Calculate
the mechanical advantage created by a lever.
Engineer
a device that uses levers or inclined planes to create a mechanical advantage.
Engineer
a device that uses friction to control the motion of an object.
Design and build
a complex machine capable of doing a specified task.
Investigate
the principles used to engineer changes in forces and motion.
Analyze various forms of energy and how living organisms sense and respond to energy.
Analyze
the cyclic nature of potential and kinetic energy (e.g., a bouncing ball, a pendulum).
Trace
the conversion of energy from one form of energy to another (e.g., light to chemical to mechanical).
Cite
examples of how organisms sense various types of energy.
Investigate and report
the response of various organisms to changes in energy (e.g., plant response to light, human response to motion, sound, light, insects’ response to changes in light intensity).
Investigate and describe
how engineers have developed devices to help us sense various types of energy (e.g., seismographs, eyeglasses, telescopes, hearing aids).
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday/Friday
NO SCHOOL
WEEK 1
Superlative Me
Have the students think of a way to describe themselves using a superlative. Ex: I have the most...
Ball toss name game w/candy
Intro to me and the class
Class Philosophy/Disclosure
Go through disclosure


Introduce journals.
Day #3

LG
: Students will identify the locations of safety equipment, review lab safety procedures, take safety test, and assign/review lab cabinets

Intro
:
Talk science journals, tech stuff, Docs
Watch a lab safety video


Main Class Body
:
Have students make a list of three hazards they see around the room. Then as a group they need to create rules that would prevent those hazards from creating an accident
Share the rules around the room as a class
Create a class set of rules in their science journals
TAKE A WALK - while on the walk identify the exits and evacuation plan for my room
Create a drawing of lab safety gone wrong
Show the students where the equipment is located
Take the safety test on CANVAS

Closure
: Review of safety procedures and table community art of what happens without lab safety
Fire extinguisher
Exits
Eye wash station
Chemical shower
Gas shut off
Safety goggles
Garbage's
Chemical Hood
Safety hazard
: Anything that poses a possible risk of bodily harm to someone.
- Nature of Science -
Day #1:

LG:
Students will be introduced to terms and will answer the question "what is science?"

Prep
: Add link to CANVAS

Intro:

Joke
Ask the students what is science?
What is the purpose of science?
Where have you used science in your day to day life?
Put students responses in their journal & TPS
Pose the question can a dolphin do science? Then show clip -

Main Class Body
:
Create a mind-web as a class based on the reading @ http://undsci.berkeley.edu/article/0_0_0/whatisscience_03
Go through vocabulary terms and flesh them out in journals [google search and class discussion]

Closure:
Fast 5 minute review and exit ticket - [How do you use science day to day?]
Day #2:

LG
:
Student's will determine the difference between observation and an inference.
Students will give examples of observations and inferences based off data [pictures]

PREP
: Use pictures in skydrive. Girl on alligator, Soldier with donkey.

Intro
:
Review previous day's stuff.
Show pics. Discuss as a class observations based on the pic.

Main Class Body
: Have class write a short story based on what they think is going on in the picture. After writing have them exchange stories and find 3 inferences that the writer made about the picture. Share a few stories and the inferences

Closure
: Define what an observation and an inference is.
Day #3 - Questions and Variables

LG
: Students will learn to formulate good scientific/testable questions

Intro
: In the learning journals have the students start a flow chart similar to the one in the book on pages NOS6-7. Today they will make a box or object that says "Observe and Question".

Main Class Body
:
Why do you ask questions? Based on what we talked about on day one, come up with some questions that are NOT scientific (think/pair/share). Why aren't they scientific? List responses, could include: personal preferences, morals, supernatural, stuff that can't be measured.
A good scientific question is measurable and has 2 variables. What is a variable in math? How do we use them?
Look at the chart. What are the two variables?
Assign each group one of the questions from the list. Have them make the question scientific by making it
measurable
and changing it to have
2 variables
.
Have each group present their new question and variables.

Closure
:
Turn in journals
Scientific Theory:
Scientific law:
Fact:
Science:
Evidence:
Tentative:
Observation, Inference
Day #4

LG
:
Students will observe and describe the behavior of bubbles using technical specific writing
Students will create a testable question & hypothesis based on inferences they made from their observations
Students will create detailed instructions for building a small structure using technical writing

PREP
:
Add assignment to CANVAS
Get Bubble mix and put it out in containers with bubble blowers

Intro
:
Show graph
Talk about the variables within it
Discuss observations made by it
Make an inference off of it

Main Class Body
:
Assign lab stations
Describe assignment [make observations then inferences off your observations of bubbles - take your inferences and create a testable question]
Hand in as a shared google doc
Discuss procedures and have them add it to their running flow chart of the science process in journal
TAKE A WALK
Discussion of technical writing
Write it do it

Closure
: Review of science process up to data collection using flow chart as guide
How is bug blood different than human blood?
Why do your finger wrinkle after you take a bath?
Is rock music better than hip-hop?
Why does bright light cause people to sneeze?
Do smells affect people's moods?
Is vegetarianism better than eating meat?
Day #5:

LG:
Students will understand the importance of technical writing to science and will produce a example of technical writing

Intro:
Review by - Creating a mind-web individually based on the reading @ http://undsci.berkeley.edu/article/0_0_0/whatisscience_03
Go through vocabulary terms and flesh them out in journals [google search and class discussion]
Review of proper questions - MAKE IT SHORT

Main Class Body
:
Discuss the importance of technical writing to science
Why do we need to have detailed procedures?
Outline the task to the class [explain write it do it]
Create a word bank on the board of adjectives used in building - this is for student use during writing
Perform write it do it

Closure
Exit ticket: What was the hardest part of writing your procedures?
Day #6:

LG
:
Students will learn how to collect data and present it in a data table.
Students will analyze data by graphing and looking for trends.

PREP
:
Have rulers, scales, protractors or any other measuring device they may need on hand.

Intro
:
Have students look at a graph and create a list as a team of components that should be required when creating a graph
Discuss the components and create a list on the board
Have students make a fake fun graph that has all of the proper parts of a graph


Main Class Body
:
Discuss with the students what data is available around the room to collect. Examples may include: shoe size vs. height, eye color vs. eyesight, etc.
Have the students choose what variables they would like to use.
Discuss types of variables. Which one is independent? Dependent?
Collect data.
Have everyone create a table in a Doc. Label and fill in the table.
Next move the data to Excel and teach the students how to graph their data.


Closure
:
Have groups present their data or do a round up depending on how much time is left.
Day #7

LG
:
Students will be able to draw conclusions to a hypothesis from relevant data
Students will understand all of the key components to a complete lab write up.

Intro/Main Body of class:

Activity 1
Have Students get their graphs from the day before ready
Discussion of the components of a conclusion [statement of hypothesis T or F and then inferences about what your data tells you as well as possibilities for further experimentation.
MODEL- drawing a conclusion off of the two graphs provided
Have students complete a conclusion statement for their graph - assess the statements by walking around and reading
Share a few conclusions to class

Activity 2
Show a lab write up template and have the students write the main sections down in their journals
Discuss the order they need to be in
Present the question to the class
Instruct them to create a GD lab write up template that will address the question
Model this with them by writing out the question where it goes and creating a hypothesis
Discuss the variables with them and add them to the chart
Have them create their own procedures.
By the end of class they need to have a lab write up ready through procedures. With the other sections having headings

Closure
: 5min review of the days content
Scientific Theory:
Scientific law:
Fact:
Science:
Evidence:
Tentative:
Hypothesis:
Scientific Method/Process
What to include in a Graph

Chart Title
Axis Titles
Independent Variable (X-Axis)
Dependent Variable (Y-Axis)
Key
Proper scale for data
Even increments for axis scale
Parts of a Conclusion
Statement of your data disproving or lending evidence to your hypothesis
Inferences from your data
Areas of other possible research
You are in groups of 4
You are given a set of 8 blocks
You are tasked to build a structure using 5 of the blocks
Build the structure
Every person writes instructions for building the structure
The team picks the best set of instructions
These instructions are passed at random to another team
Now every team has a new set of instructions and blocks
Attempt to build the structure from the instructions
Talk to the text with the purpose of highlighting what does not make sense to you
I will show you a picture of how the finished structure should look
Talk to the text again about what would have helped you understand the instructions better
The instructions are handed back to the original group for review.
We will then discuss what was difficult and the skills we need to work on
-Instructions for Write it do it-
Day #8
Day #1:

LG:


Prep
:

Intro:


Main Class Body
:

Closure:
Day #2:

LG:


Prep
:

Intro:


Main Class Body
:

Closure:
Day #3:

LG:


Prep
:

Intro:


Main Class Body
:

Closure:
Day #4/5:

LG:


Prep
:

Intro:


Main Class Body
:

Closure:
Day #1: Intro to VPCsim and Iteration 1

LG:

Students determine factors that influence the environment in a virtual simulator

Prep
:
Look over VPCsim Exploration Guide
VPCsim.usu.edu

Intro:

What are some requirements for plants to survive and thrive? (Brainstorm/share evidence or make an individual journal entry. Discuss how influential factors (air, temperature, water, light, etc.) impact plants (adaptation, growth, etc.). – share as needed.

Main Class Body
:
Introduce the VPCsim site (using a student driver to model site manipulation) providing some questions to lead investigations such as:
How do you know how to fly, walk, etc.? (Movement)
How do you know the number of plants you have? (Data)
How do you look at plants over time? How are the changes in plant numbers represented? (Data & Time)
How do you create a new simulation? (Initiate an investigation)

Each student will run the default exploring the environment with teacher guidance. (Have students make a note of findings.)

Class Discussion: What tools did you find and how could that influence your ability to explore how plant growth is influenced?
Have the students share with the class/teacher VPCsim capabilities. Ensure that students understand:
Movement modes, Data views – plots & numerical, Change over time, Creation of a new simulation.

Closure:
What did you learn about factors that influence plant growth? Share the observations you made and then finalize your journal entry with a response to the following prompt: I learned that If… then… because…
Day 2: ISIT Module 3

LG:

Develop researchable question and define role as researcher and students as research assistants. As a researcher the teacher shares.
Have the class set up 1 experiment that will provide data to help answer the research question.
Engage students in critiquing and defending their conclusions and introduce homework.

Prep
:
vpcsim.usu.edu
Set up spreadsheet or form for collecting class data

Intro:

Revisit day 1 exploration of simulated environment. Introduce the broad research question of: What factors influence the relationship between organisms? Have a whole class discussion connecting yesterday’s investigation, day 1 homework, and today’s research question.

Main Class Body
:
Part 1 (15 min)
Develop researchable question and define role as researcher and students as research assistants.
As a researcher the teacher shares.
1. Describe the setting and process of having teacher as the lead researcher and students acting as research assistants.
2. Select a student assistant to document research process in google sites. (project for class & provide guidance to student assistant)
3. Walk through the process of creating a research question. We considered competition, which lead to looking at environmental impacts. We developed the following question that we thought could be answered using VPCsim: (How do environmental factors affect plant growth? (Different variables can be selected for each class period, i.e., sunlight, water, temperature)

As appropriate share:

Science principles that should be discussed: replication (in connection with running multiple simulations with the same inputs), variables, independent dependent, data variations, different approaches to investigating data.
Define the process of supporting a scientific investigation. Include item of new literacy of researching….(google advance)-teacher talk aloud through process.
Modeling???

Part 2 (15 min)
1. Articulate purpose/question, hypothesis, and methods(research procedures).
2. Run experiment by inputting data: Default data… with the change of one variable. Group students into Highest, High, Normal,
Low, Lowest (While running simulation, Groups enter data from their simulation on the class google doc: entering data for plant numbers at 0, 50, 100, 150, and 200 generations.)
3. Work in groups to discuss the impact that was observed when the group ran the simulation with the modification assigned. Focus on the individual group findings from their data.
4. Have each student craft one conclusion statement based on the evidence and record in a paper version journal. As students finish personal conclusions statements have them share with a peer.

(Early Finishers: Connect groups and have them discuss differences in their conclusions as a sponge.)

Closure:

Move to a whole class discussion developing common inferences from the data. Discussion should lead to shared understandings that are validated with evidence from the data.
Introduce “alternative conclusions” and culminate conversation with a statement that the entire class creates based on individual statements referencing data and posted in google sites …(Student assistant documents the final class statement in google doc.)

Homework: Have students identify other explanations beyond what was discussed in class? (Find explanations to extend investigation.)
Day #3:

LG:

Find additional resources to help understand why we saw what we saw in our investigation
Link today's search for scientific principles to support findings with future investigation questions

Prep
:

Intro:

Starter: Teacher demonstrates new literacy search of online resources that would inform simulation observations.

Discussion:
What did we learn yesterday which leads to specific questions? Discuss how a prediction may be right but the “because” is incorrect. Why do pine
trees thrive in dry conditions? Why do willow trees thrive in wet conditions? Discuss how we can find support for what we have observed, leading to
external resources such as the internet.

Main Class Body
:

1. Provide background on how to conduct an effective web search. (Google, ask.com, Wikipedia, Google Advanced)
Model: locating relevant information, evaluating usefulness, synthesizing information to producing explanations, communication of shared research findings.
2. As a class create a list of key words to assist in a web search. (Adaptation, willow tree (salix), pine tree (pinus), water, survive, growth, dry environment, wet environment)
3. Demonstrate search process and finding evidence to support or inform predictions.
4. Share process for clarifying what you are looking for and not click happy searching
5. Pairs of students collaborate on a search and provide findings using the “team discussion” template. Students should identify
2 sites that inform conclusions based on prior observations. The team discussion should provide new understandings that connect the previously collected data with scientific principles. Have the students identify the website, what was learned from the site, and discuss why it is a reliable source and place information under the team discussion. Suggestion is two sites per group.
6. Have the paired students share their finding from the internet with another group.
7. Whole class share of the new information that has been collected that informs about the topic.

Closure:
• Individual students should develop a working hypothesis using the “If…” “Then…” “Because…” format. In this format the “Then”
aspect should connect to the observed data from the simulation. The “Because” component should connect to the information
obtained in the internet search and identify the source of the information. (The then statement would come from the data and
the because statement would come from the internet search.) Example: If we increased the water in an environment, then the
willow tree population increased from 3123 to 5913 over 200 years because willow tree root systems are dense, shallow, and
widespread over a large area.

• Final discussion: Introduce the concept of new investigations that emerge from the current data and understanding. What else
could we investigate using VPCsim? Are there unique characteristics of the possible plants in the simulation that could help us
learn about environmental and other factors that impact plant growth.
Day #4/5:

Objective: Consider capabilities available in VPCsim to understand and investigate the relationship between plants and the
environment
Small groups develop researchable questions that are shared with the whole class. Introduce new question “How does altering
environmental factors affect plant species”.
1. Look at plant description page and information provided to discuss how one setting (e.g., high temp, low water, high light)
available in VPCsim could be investigated. Topics to discuss:
Disturbance
Sampling
Area of single plant
Altitude
Placing plants
Colonization
Variables
Invasive plants
Variable combinations and control
2. Create 3 possible research questions as a class and have groups identify a specific question from those created by the class.
(Example questions shared as needed, consider peer or group dialogue prior to engaging entire class)
a. How does the relationship between water level and plant levels vary across temperature?
b. How does altitude affect population sizes of different species?
c. How does water levels affect the age, number, or biomass of plants?
d. How does a plants response to water level predict its response to temperature (e.g., pine did better at high water, therefore
I predict it will do better at high heat)

Objective: Determine and develop researchable question and design procedures and document. (iteration 2)
1. Break into groups of 3-4 members…
2. Select question to begin research.
3. Create group google spreadsheet for experimental procedures and have groups determine 1)Research Question, 2)Hypothesis,
3) Step-by-step design procedures.
4. Document question, hypothesis, design procedures and link google
Question: Is dowsing a repeatable scientific phenomenon?
Hypothesis: I don't think dowsing is scientific BECAUSE I don't think it is repeatable.
Methods:
Outline a plot outside
Dowse within the plot making a pattern that would cover all possible underground sprinkler lines.
Have someone mark on a map the place the dowsing rod finds water
Infer a pattern from the lines and connect the dots.
Draw map on board and have every group put their data onto the map.
See if there are consistent patterns
ISIT Module 3: "What factors influence the relationships between organisms?"
https://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&pid=sites&srcid=ZGVmYXVsdGRvbWFpbnxpc2l0cGRjMW0zfGd4OjcwMTMyMDJiNDA3NTk5Yzg
This module was developed by USU science educators for Utah's 8th grade core curriculum. You should read instructions at the following link to read the scope and purpose of the project.
https://docs.google.com/document/d/1gVJJ46CDrWYcy9AB4wD7gQgS4-0ZQeqmEZ3NZVqvmhg/edit
What did you learn about factors that influence plant growth? Share the observations you made and then finalize your journal entry with a response to the following prompt: I learned that If… then… because…
This module takes 2 weeks
What are some requirements for plants to survive and thrive?
Repeat the experiment one more time in pairs. Have the students develop their own questions and procedures. Do a peer review instead of presentations.
Day #1:

LG:


Prep
:

Intro:


Main Class Body
:

Closure:
Day #2:

LG:


Prep
:

Intro:


Main Class Body
:

Closure:
Day #3:

LG:


Prep
:

Intro:


Main Class Body
:

Closure:
Day #4/5:

LG:


Prep
:

Intro:


Main Class Body
:

Closure:
What are seom depositional features you see?
Erosional features?
Full transcript